RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'n0arp' found 241 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 13  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Ram 3500 DRW Tires

Taller tire means less towing capacity. If you're talking about gearing, yes, but the impact here is relatively minimal. Otherwise, a proper wheel/tire combination could be taller and still (theoretically, for the weight police here) increase towing capacity by increasing the payload capacity. 235/80r17 = 31.8" (factory size on DRW) 255/80r17 = 33.1" (discussed here) 275/80r18 = 33.2" (factory 18 on SRW) 285/60r20 = 33.0" (factory 20 on SRW) 245/70r19.5 = 33.3" (what I run, and mentioned above in this thread) So all things considered, going to the 255/80r17 will provide the same final drive ratio as a factory SRW with the same drivetrain/gearing. I don't consider that a big deal. Use AlfaOBD to reprogram the tire size if you want all the shift points, etc to be exact. You could go up to a 35" with your 4.10s, and be right at 3.73 which is a very common ratio sold on Rams that tow heavy.
n0arp 07/29/21 10:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: solar question

It really depends on your personal use and expectations. For us, solar is necessary to facilitate our desired lifestyle. If you're just using your rig on weekends, and have minimal electrical requirements, then you may not need it. Our solar panels are on a raised rack that shades our entire roof and our awnings shade our sides.
n0arp 07/29/21 09:43am Truck Campers
RE: Ram 3500 DRW Tires

Over on a Cummins-specific forum, lots of people are running 255s and as long as they keep adequate pressure in them, they don't come near touching. Personally I wouldn't, but plenty of people do. There are several threads on it over there. Some run quarter inch spacers. There are a few people who go all the way to 285s with a 1" spacer, which is getting dangerous. If you want a bigger/wider tire, you really need to replace the wheels with something like DDC or American Force forged, and be sure to consider the weight carrying capacity. The 17x6" isn't wide enough to put a 255 on, at least according to most manufacturers I've seen, who call for a 6.5" minimum width. Some chain, or more reputable tire shops might refuse to mount them. You could also go to 19.5s. I'm running 245/70r19.5 on 19.5x6.75" wheels. For other reasons, they're equally annoying to get mounted.
n0arp 07/29/21 09:13am Tow Vehicles
RE: Composting Toilet

I bought this nature’s head RV self contained composting toilet to be installed in my RV. It's an appropriate option. This product has durable construction with stainless steel hardware, simple to disassemble for easy dumping, features a low volume fan inside the toilet’s head to dissipate odor effectively. I was also thrilled to see how well it did, keeping my bathroom odor-free. Wow, you revived an old thread that hasn't seen activity in nearly five years. I came here to add my .02, which is that I have an Air Head Composting Toilet in my truck camper and it works great.
n0arp 07/29/21 08:07am Truck Campers
RE: Black tank treatments.

We usually don't add anything to our tanks - if they begin to smell we'll add a dose of Happy Camper, which may be once a year or two. We're full-timers, so our rigs get a lot of use. We have an Air Head composting toilet in our truck camper, so the truck camper only has grey tanks. We still have conventional black tanks in our fifth wheel (two of them, one for each bathroom). I don't think we've ever had a black tank smell, and grey generally smells worse, despite that most would assume the opposite. I think it's because of the rotting food that collects in the galley tanks. Anyway, no need to add anything to the tanks unless they have an odor, and if they have an odor, you might want to look at the venting/trap situation instead of trying to neutralize the smell with chemicals.
n0arp 07/28/21 01:59pm Truck Campers
RE: Great Tow Capacity - Bad Payload Capacity... Increase PL?

^It might be ok if you were actually right about what you’re talking about, but alas, you’re not. So in this case, it would be better to not say anything at all. Please share your knowledge with the group. 10,000lb GVWR 7,400lb curb weight So how do those two numbers limit the payload to 1,600lb? I'll wait for you to do the math for us. It's very simple. Actual scale tickets do not correspond with the weights on the resource you provided. A highly optioned MegaCab scaling 8300lbs isn't unheard of. Here is FCA's official weight for a 2021 2500 4x4 MegaCab in *Big Horn* trim, which is a pretty low trim level. If OP has a Laramie, Longhorn, or Limitied, another few hundred pounds is easy to account for. 7954.57lbs. I pulled the numbers for 2016 as well, but they don't say what trims they're for. They publish a figure of 7,971 for 2016 in an unknown but likely base (Tradesman) trim. https://imgur.com/Vl94hhu.jpg width=640 Further, if you look at the chart, you can see that payload is an approximation (rounded to the nearest ten pounds) of GVWR - Total Base Weight. 10000 GVWR - 7950 Total Base Weight = 2050 Payload My Longhorn DRW scaled over 8600lbs the day I brought it home. Payload is, not coincidentally, 5400lbs and GVWR is 14000lbs. I have no idea who RoadSumo.com is, or where they got those numbers, but they're way off. The chart I provided is an excerpt from a document provided from FCA themselves, an actual authority on the subject. I don't understand why you would trust a third party resource like that when the data is provided by the manufacturer, unless you are attempting to cherry pick pieces to support your argument.
n0arp 07/28/21 08:15am Tow Vehicles
RE: Great Tow Capacity - Bad Payload Capacity... Increase PL?

^It might be ok if you were actually right about what you’re talking about, but alas, you’re not. So in this case, it would be better to not say anything at all. Agreed.
n0arp 07/27/21 08:55pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Great Tow Capacity - Bad Payload Capacity... Increase PL?

Also that payload capacity indicates, in this case, that the Ford is 1000lbs lighter -- a heavier truck (to be fair, this is a 100% anecdotal claim I've read online, which my personal experience seems to agree with) tends to handle a heavy trailer better in adverse conditions. Much less so with a fifth wheel than a travel trailer, but still... Wow, the Dodge curb weight runs 8500lb? That's insane. I'm sure it will pull a 5000lb 5th wheel great because it's so much heavier than the trailer. 3/4T trucks are sold as class 2b, which is limited to 10K GVWR (for tax/registration purposes). The Ram is most likely heavier due to the optioning, not just the engine. The Ford could easily be just as heavy with the right trim. GVWR - weight = payload. Edit: found your Ford is a 2008, which easily explains the rest of the difference as all three competitors have gained weight in newer generations. Fortunately for most owners, they also provide axle weight ratings, which are not artificially capped. You will find the majority of newer 3/4Ts pulling fifth wheels are over GVWR, but a lot of them still under axle ratings. A 6500 RAWR on the Ram leaves around 3K to spare, where all the pin weight sits, without going over either of the axle ratings. So do what you want with that information. You have a 2008. Newer trucks have grown in almost all metrics, but still have the same 10K cap for class 2b (your truck might even be lower due to the year). The 2016 Ram would most certainly handle any trailer better than your 2008 Ford.
n0arp 07/27/21 08:05am Tow Vehicles
RE: Great Tow Capacity - Bad Payload Capacity... Increase PL?

1600lb payload vs 2700lb payload CTD vs V10... I'd argue that the Ram will pull it better, the exhaust brake will control it better going down hill. I'm trying to remember the last year Ford put a V10 in the Superduty, probably a decade ago? What is the rear axle rating on that F250, compared to the 6500 lbs rear axle rating on the Ram 2500? You are too focused on an arbitrary advertising number (10,000 lbs GVWR) rather than the actual functionality of the whole truck. But hey, to each his own. Also that payload capacity indicates, in this case, that the Ford is 1000lbs lighter -- a heavier truck (to be fair, this is a 100% anecdotal claim I've read online, which my personal experience seems to agree with) tends to handle a heavy trailer better in adverse conditions. Much less so with a fifth wheel than a travel trailer, but still...
n0arp 07/26/21 04:52pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Still Having Problems With TC and Truck

Continuing on the flatbed discussion: I have a flatbed with boxes above and below. It's steel - very heavy, but I can do field repairs and modifications with a small flux core welder I carry. I'm always making small tweaks to it. If weight is an issue (and it sounds like it is), you probably need to stick with aluminum. You can also forgo the boxes to keep weight down. I have 19' of 18x18" storage. https://www.lifeenroute.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/Untitled.jpg width=640 I've had my truck up on three corners with the steel flatbed and there was no visible deflection. I'm not sure the same would be true of the stock bed or an aluminum bed - but I think the 4" C-channel with several crossmembers that sits on top of my frame rails certainly contributes to the rigidity. I went with steel for the ability to self-repair and because I'm not so sure aluminum would handle long-term abuse as well. Of course, steel is a pain to keep from rusting without a powdercoat or bedliner, which may come in the future.
n0arp 07/26/21 03:04pm Truck Campers
RE: Still Having Problems With TC and Truck

This is one of the only forums I know where people make up their own ideas about what happened even when the issues were already stated. Happens all the time here, but the best knowledge of RVs is you guys so this is where I post questions. You gotta nip that stuff weird stuff in the bud to keep the thread on track. Your problem IS the "weird stuff." Never heard of a non-rusty, non-abused truck bed collapsing under the weight of a TC. There are a lot of people hauling much heavier TCs than yours over more miles, not having this problem. Hackjob tie-down install (photos prove it) Unmaintained ball joints leading to total front end failure ... Unwillingness to accept any feedback or fault I think we know where the issue lies.
n0arp 07/26/21 01:36pm Truck Campers
RE: 8 / 40 volts to 12 volts

I had a couple of these in the 48V to 12V version, and they're junk. Using Victron Orions now.
n0arp 07/25/21 01:31pm Tech Issues
RE: Great Tow Capacity - Bad Payload Capacity... Increase PL?

OP stated: "So I have a 2016 Ram 2500 Megacab with the 6.7 Cummins. I love it. Great truck. It has plenty of tow capacity for us and our current trailer and possible future 5th Wheel upgrade at 16,936lbs." I am taking this to say, the tow capacity of the OPs truck is 16,936, not the weight of the FW he is considering. A srw 3500 would struggle with a 17K FW. OPs truck may run out of tire capacity as the FW nears 14-15K. Jerry We swapped over to 19.5s on our '15 SRW 2500 for this. For a while, we also ran Method MR305 NV wheels rated for 4500#/ea, with Cooper STT Pro tires rated for 4080#/ea, which were notably less stable than the 19.5s. We ran a full Kelderman air ride on that truck, which is the same suspension whether you have a 2500 or 3500. We bought a DRW when we decided to go FT, and found it notably more stable (with OE LRE tires) than the SRW with 19.5s. ... Now we have a heavy truck camper and 19.5s on the DRW... With our HO/AISIN model, at least, there are a lot of differences between the 2500 and 3500. The entire driveline (aside from the front axle, I think) is different. Rear axle is definitely different with a much larger tube. Rear brakes are much larger. Transmission (obviously), transfer case, and rear differential are different. HO differences aside, the suspension on the 2500s and 3500s is a lot more different on Ram than it is on the other brands.
n0arp 07/25/21 12:42pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Airstreams and compressor fridges?

You get to choose between 12V and 120V when you order. Whichever you choose, you're stuck with. Our house bank is 48VDC and inverter always on, so we decided to go with 120V. It's an easy DIY project, if you're handy. We went with the conversion because we camp at high elevation, don't always level, know about the fire risks associated with (especially unlevel) absorption units, etc. And of course, we have enough solar/battery to comfortably opt for the consistency and other benefits of a compressor unit. That's something you have to account for, depending on how you camp. I've since replaced the unit with a Haier 9.8 cu. ft. apartment fridge, which has the same exterior cabinet size but a lot more usable space inside, and uses roughly the same energy. With the conversion, you're stuck with the same usable space as the fridge you start with. A 7.5 cu. ft. Norcold vs 9.8 cu. ft fridge residential, and in our case, the space is important enough to justify the change. According to the Haier safety instructions that fridge is not supposed to be installed in an enclosure. http://pdf.lowes.com/useandcareguides/688057309156_use.pdf?_gl=1*1wc67qi*_gcl_aw*R0NMLjE2MjcxMzU4NzMuQ2owS0NRanc5TzZIQmhDckFSSXNBRHg1cUNRamRTUG1MTlZuYjExLXVDQjljZjQ0OHZ5djZoS2p5dm5GRGVWUWJ0alBRZzZCdzV4TWQyWWFBbjZ1RUFMd193Y0I.*_gcl_dc*R0NMLjE2MjcxMzU4NzMuQ2owS0NRanc5TzZIQmhDckFSSXNBRHg1cUNRamRTUG1MTlZuYjExLXVDQjljZjQ0OHZ5djZoS2p5dm5GRGVWUWJ0alBRZzZCdzV4TWQyWWFBbjZ1RUFMd193Y0I. I've read so many instructions PDF's from 120V fridges and most all small (10 cu.ft and under) 120V home fridges don't make the cut for RV install. It has plenty of space around it. The only place that it actually touches anything is the trim around the front fascia, and of course underneath. There is 6” of clearance up top (and a roof vent), nearly 2” on each side, plus plenty of space and vent at the back. From the same manual you pointed out: • The following are recommended clearances around the refrigerator: Sides...............1” (25 mm) Top....................1" (25 mm) Back..................2" (50mm) Most (small and otherwise) residential fridges are fine to retrofit. When the manual says not to enclose them, it just means don’t put them in a solid box that is flush all around.
n0arp 07/24/21 09:16am Travel Trailers
RE: Airstreams and compressor fridges?

You get to choose between 12V and 120V when you order. Whichever you choose, you're stuck with. Our house bank is 48VDC and inverter always on, so we decided to go with 120V. It's an easy DIY project, if you're handy. We went with the conversion because we camp at high elevation, don't always level, know about the fire risks associated with (especially unlevel) absorption units, etc. And of course, we have enough solar/battery to comfortably opt for the consistency and other benefits of a compressor unit. That's something you have to account for, depending on how you camp. I've since replaced the unit with a Haier 9.8 cu. ft. apartment fridge, which has the same exterior cabinet size but a lot more usable space inside, and uses roughly the same energy. With the conversion, you're stuck with the same usable space as the fridge you start with. A 7.5 cu. ft. Norcold vs 9.8 cu. ft fridge residential, and in our case, the space is important enough to justify the change.
n0arp 07/23/21 06:35pm Travel Trailers
RE: Airstreams and compressor fridges?

Can you tell me more about this conversion unit. I'm not familiar with this and how it's applied, or incorporated into an existing absorption refrigerator. Thanks You remove the absorption unit and replace it with a compressor. You end up keeping the same cabinet. https://jc-refrigeration.com/product-category/hvac/
n0arp 07/23/21 05:51pm Travel Trailers
RE: Airstreams and compressor fridges?

Yes I will ask there too, thanks. Does anyone know the comparison of amp draw between the 2? My Norcold N841 converted to the JCR HVAC unit used 1.0-1.3kWh/day, depending on ambient conditions.
n0arp 07/23/21 04:10pm Travel Trailers
RE: Tag axle for truck camper rigs

The brochure says they use boat wheels for the application and they look pretty close to the wheels I have on my boat trailer. My tires are rated for 1380 lb One of the photos is clear enough to see it is running a Kenda Loadstar 205/65r10 tire, rated for 1100lbs. It looks like there are other models with larger tires.
n0arp 07/23/21 11:46am Truck Campers
RE: Airstreams and compressor fridges?

You could use a JC Refrigeration HVAC conversion unit.
n0arp 07/23/21 11:43am Travel Trailers
RE: Tag axle for truck camper rigs

PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I'M WRONG; If tag/trailer axle's wheels/tires spin independently, wouldn't that eliminate tire scrubbing? My HMMWV trailer is that way; with torsion bars for suspension. No, each tire moving independently reduces or eliminates scrubbing for single axle setups, where the inside tire needs to cover a shorter distance in a turn than the outer tire. That still applies to each axle independently here, but you introduce another pivot point that essentially requires the tag axle to drag sideways in order track with the drive axle. Since tires don't roll sideways (they aren't spheres, though that would be interesting), you end up with scrub. Next time you see a tandem axle fifth wheel making a sharp turn, watch the rear axle. It's extremely obvious in that setup. Note that each wheel has its own hub assembly and the rotation happens there, so each tire can move at a different speed than its partner. You don't need torsion axles, by the way, to have each wheel turn at independent speeds. Just about every setup does that - and that's also why they have open diffs in most cars.
n0arp 07/23/21 10:45am Truck Campers
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 13  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.