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 > Your search for posts made by 'ognend' found 77 matches.

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RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

You edited the post after my intial reply and made this about a fuel pump. Yeah, so that leaves only Ford shipping CP4s -- which have received incremental year to year improvements, by the way. The majority of your whole argument against diesels is the fuel pump, which falls apart here. Duramax moved away from CP4 in 17, I think. The title of this thread is "OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS WITH NEW DIESEL PICKUPS". I literally listed all the operational problems with 2011-onwards diesel pickups ("new"). I explained the cost of ownership of a "new" diesel pickup vs gasser and how many miles/years it would take to make up the $10K premium of a diesel engine vs a gasser engine. I explained that the new 2020+ gas engines are potent tow-ers with plenty of HP and torque, that can easily satisfy the towing needs of the general - occasional - towing public that tows weights below, let's say 16-18,000 lbs. I also explained that the new gas engines are also much cheaper to operate and maintain and do not suffer from all the drama associated with the new diesels. IMHO the diesel truck manufacturers have been focusing on the wrong objectives - competing on extra lbs of towing capacity and higher torque. Instead, they should be competing on reliability and quality. But those things are not easy to measure. You can't say "New Duramax is 17.3% more reliable". What is much easier to say is "New Duramax has leading torque in its class, exceeding the competition by 17 ft/lbs of torque and 12 HP". In essence, they are competing on "whose is bigger" and the unwashed masses that are conditioned to lap this up - are lapping it up. As for your claim that I am overstating the CP4 problems - there are literally millions and millions of trucks out there with a ticking time bomb (the CP4 pump) - all powerstrokes from 2011-2021, Duramaxes from 2011-2016 and Cummins from 2014 and onwards. That's a lot of potentially expensive repairs for a hell of a lot of people. Ford is embroiled in a class action lawsuit, so is GM. RAM is probably next. You telling me that my beef is with a pump, not a fuel system is silly. Diesels can be great but they are NOT great in millions and millions of vehicles sold in the last 10+ years. What about emissions systems? Plenty of expensive repairs in that arena as well. Why do you think half of these trucks are deleted, despite the fact that it is illegal to do so? You grossly overexaggerate the issues. I could equally say that you are understating the problems. I could say that your whole premise has been "I am rich and buy what I want and I want a diesel and if you can't afford it, buy a gasser"? Although you also said "buy the right tool for the job". So, one of us must be confused ;) For most of the fools out there towing, say, 8-15,000 lbs once or twice a month to the local campgrounds within a 500 mile radius and whose trucks otherwise do not work for a living hauling equipment around construction sites etc. - please explain to me why the diesel is the right tool for the job (righter) than the new 2020+ gasser like the 7.3L Ford or the 6.6L Chevy. Esp. at the $10K premium right off the bat and the much higher maintenance/operational cost down the road. On Ram, there are three different transmissions, three different transfer cases, and two different rear axles in use for 2019+MY. Don't know about Ford. Generally, diesel parts across the board are strengthened to deal with the additional torque. These are bogus claims, of course. Diesel engine have higher torques so they have strenghtened parts - well, you are explaining why - to deal with higher torques and the heavier weight of the engine. I have never heard of a higher axle or frame or transfer case or anything else failure rate in gassers than in diesel, don't be silly :)
ognend 04/17/21 03:25am Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

In summary, it sounds like you had a poor experience with a Powerstroke 6.7 that you bought, and swore off all diesel engines after that. I actually still own the truck. I am just not blind to what is happening in the world of diesel and gas engines ;)
ognend 04/16/21 08:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

I'm not gullible enough to buy a Powerstroke. People are having the same issues with the new Cummins trucks. In fact, RAM switched back to a CP3 pump. Duramaxes are having the same issues as well. Around $10K, but who buys a BMW or any german car without expecting repairs? You can swap both Duramax and Cummins to CP3 if the CP4 keeps you up at night. I think you are proving yourself what I am saying. You just spent $80K buying a "German" only to spend more thousands on crippling it back to a lesser fuel pump, to protect it from an expensive failure. How about the emissions systems failures? Plenty of those as well. An argument against a particular fuel pump is not a valid argument against a fuel. Fuel pump, emissions systems, complexity, cost of ownership.... Buy the right tool for the job. I'm not telling anyone what to buy. I'm saying that the issues with diesel engines are not as common as you portray, and that you fail to acknowledge that some things are bought because they're wanted, not needed. Above you just told me that you are buying luxury and that people are buying "wants". Now you are telling me to buy the right tool for the job - which is what I have been saying all along. If you are towing < 15-16K lbs and you are doing it casually (like 90% of Americans), 2020+ gassers like the 7.3L Ford or the 6.6L Chevy or even the 6.4L RAM with the new ZF 8-sp tranny are the tool for the job. You can even camp and put away the savings from the diesels into your retirement fund. They do, but it's not anywhere close. And every one I've towed with has had to scream to utilize it with anything marginally steep or heavy. However did we tow things back when the "legendary" and "indestructible" diesels didn't have exhaust brakes? ;) There is a whole lot more to this than payload/GVWR even if you aren't discussing being overweight. Longevity will vary between parts, with the heavier parts usually lasting longer under similar loading. And for those of us who spend a lot of time off-road, the transfer cases and axles are often of great value. I don't want to snap a shaft with a heavy camper while crawling off a small shelf. Point to an example of a 3/4 ton or 1-ton SRW where the tranny or the axle or whatever is "heavier duty" in a diesel than in an equivalent gasser.
ognend 04/16/21 08:51pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

To say they are laden with issues is a blatant exaggeration. Spend some time on the Powerstroke 6.7L facebook group or on any powerstroke online forums. What is the first recommendation you get on these forums? Install a CP4 disaster kit or a fass lift pump. 2nd recommendation? Delete the emissions system. 3rd recommendation? Oil changes every 5K and fuel filter changes every 10K miles and DO NOT FORGET TO USE A LUBRICATING ADDITIVE (!). If these new diesels were so great and reliable, why spend $3-4K on these changes (and void warranty and go illegal)? Why accelerate the manufacturer recommended maintenance schedule? Ford says you don't need to use an additive but will not cover the CP4 pump failures... My '16 Powerstroke had TSB 16-0041 at 4,000 miles (emissions system). At 15,000 miles a new water pump. At 30,000 miles a left lean bank sensor. At 40,000 miles a slow coolant leak that nobody has been able to find and I am now at 52,000 miles. Is it leaking out of the radiator cap? Out of the radiator inlet? At the off-gas bottle cap? At any of the hose fittings? Maybe it is leaking into the intercooler? Who knows? The engine is so crammed you can't see anything and it passing all the pressure tests.... And not everything is about cost... you don't buy a Corvette over a Spark for economy, yet they sell plenty of them and don't kick up the same amount of dust the diesel vs gas debate does. Sure, if you have money coming out of your ears, it is never about cost ;). Besides, you are talking about extremes (Corvette vs Spark but there are MANY alternatives in between at all different cost points). I am talking about two classes of vehicles - one that fits most people's needs (esp. with the new 7.3L Ford gas and 6.6L Chevy gas offerings) and another - that has become a super expensive monstrosity that is not even that reliable anymore. I had a CP4 failure covered under warranty on my 335D So you did have a CP4 failure? ;) What was the bill? $10K? $12K? Lucky you warranty covered it. Ford is not covering them, that's why there is a class action lawsuit. after that converted my GM LML to a CP3, and will do the same for my Ram when the warranty is up. Why? If diesels are so reliable..... I have absolutely no concerns about my diesel I was talking about money - what modern diesels cost to maintain/operate and the issues they are seeing. Vehicles, with few possible exceptions, are pay to play, and people buy what they want. Very few buy just what they need, or else there would be a lot more people hauling with basic work trucks and commuting in econoboxes. People buy what they are programmed to buy or what others tell them to buy. "Hey guys, I bought a 10K lbs travel trailer, what truck do I get???". "Buy a diesel! They last forever and they have awesome power!". I am here to tell you that this "diesels are indestructible" myth is based on old and simple diesel machines of the pre-2004 era - those were cheap AND simple to operate! New ones? Nope. Like my 1970 Massey Ferguson tractor with the legendary Perkins diesel engine - compare that to today's emissions laden Masseys that mandate that a farmer has at least two tractors - a new one and a 50 year old one for when the new one fails.... IMHO most people have no idea about towing capacities and payloads. They just buy whatever they think is adequate or whatever they have heard from someone is adequate (salesman, online RV forum, whatever). If people bought based on educated decisions (cost of ownership, payloads, towing capacities etc. etc.) - most would NOT own a today's diesel. Two final points: The value of exhaust braking in modern diesels should not be overlooked if you are traveling in the mountains I agree, easier to tow with an exhaust brake but gassers have natural engine retardation so that counts for something at least. Diesel variants usually come with stronger transmissions, transfer cases, axles, etc, and that is part of the premium Hmmm. An F-250 gasser and F-350 gasser (in the SRW version) will almost always be rated for more payload because the gas engine is lighter than the diesel so at least in "legal" ratings with in a particular GVWR it will have more payload. The 7.3L Godzilla gasser Ford comes with the same 10-sp tranny as the equivalent Powerstroke. As far as I am aware, the same axles etc, are in the gassers and diesels up to and including the 1 ton trucks. A lot of the time they get artificially de-rated (on paper) to fit a lesser class of truck. It would not make any sense for the manufacturer to use different axles on an equivalent F-250 or F-350 gasser/diesel trucks. In fact, the "new" 10-sp tranny used by 2020/2021 Ford gasser/diesel offerings is built by GM and there is a rumor of a 10sp 6.6L Chevy gasser for 2022....
ognend 04/16/21 08:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: F350 SRW Enough Truck

I was referring to my 15 RAM/CUMMINS. My coolant interval is 150k same with valve adjust. I also understand being able to easily work on my engine compared to others. Sorry, when I say "newer" diesels I mean the CP4 diesels, don't know much about Cummins. The official coolant interval per Ford manual is 105K miles I think but people are doing it at 30-50K all in the hope that the engines will last what the old 7.3Ls did. It's become stupid at this point, over maintenance and all but apparently the consensus is that either they work all day every day or if you are a casual pavement princess or low-milage tower, then excess maintenance is in order.... what do I know.... For some unknown reason Cummins went from the CP3 to the CP4 in 2019 & 2020 and back to CP3 2021. It's not an unknown reason - the reason is the excessive amount of CP4 failures.
ognend 04/16/21 06:20pm Tow Vehicles
RE: F350 SRW Enough Truck

I was referring to my 15 RAM/CUMMINS. My coolant interval is 150k same with valve adjust. I also understand being able to easily work on my engine compared to others. Sorry, when I say "newer" diesels I mean the CP4 diesels, don't know much about Cummins. The official coolant interval per Ford manual is 105K miles I think but people are doing it at 30-50K all in the hope that the engines will last what the old 7.3Ls did. It's become stupid at this point, over maintenance and all but apparently the consensus is that either they work all day every day or if you are a casual pavement princess or low-milage tower, then excess maintenance is in order.... what do I know....
ognend 04/16/21 11:44am Tow Vehicles
RE: F350 SRW Enough Truck

"The new diesels are complex beasts that require crazy maintenance and are prone to pump, turbo, emissions etc." Not sure what you mean by "crazy maintenance" ??? I change my oil and two fuel filters @ 15k. Air filter schedule is 20k, I just do mine at 15k also. Not sure that should be considered "crazy maintenance". If you go onto any Facebook Powerstroke 6.7 group or to any powerstroke forum or look up many "reputable" powerstroke service people's videos - they all recommend oil changes every 5K miles and then all fuel filters every 10K miles. If you are not doing this yourself, it will cost you roughly $150 per oil change and $350 per both oil/fuel filters service. Then there is the recommendation to use a lubricating additive to keep the CP4 from exploding (with every full tank). Many people also drain/refill their coollant every 30-50K miles for good measure. It has become nuts out there on these recommendations. A lot of people are installing CP4 disaster prevention kits like the S&S or the SPE even when there is no proof they actually work. So on and so on. Every time someone comes on to complain about something regarding any of these new diesels, they are always waved off as "improper maintenance". Should have done this more, should have done that more frequently. Don't use Rotella, use Amsoil, use hot-shot additive, the list goes on and on. There are plenty of "testimonies" online of Ford denying warranties on the CP4 pumps, blaming contaminated fuel. Apparently Americans can't make a good high pressure fuel pump and they are using the German made Bosch - which is made for clean European diesel. Apparently here in the States we cannot guarantee that the ULSD will be clean, always. Overall, the new diesels operate within very tight tolerances and are super touchy and sensitive with many more parts that fail, some of which fail spectacularly (like the CP4 pump which destroys the whole fuel system and can cost up to $12K to fix). I believe there are lawsuits out there right now concerning Ford and the pump (https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/hilliard-martinez-gonzales-llp-federal-judge-rejects-ford-motor-companys-arguments-to-dismiss-cp4-fuel-pump-defect-class-action-301175076.html). If you think you are safe for not owning a Ford, the same pump is in every other new diesel, I think. . . . Or you could just get a gasser ;) - if you are towing infrequently or weights that are not excessive. None of the emission or HPFP drama, none of the turbo failing stuff, no super expensive oil/fuel filter changes, engine is simple, you can see the ground through the engine bay. I seriously feel pity for the mechanics who work on the 6.7Ls - how do you even get access to a lot of the stuff....?
ognend 04/16/21 10:33am Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

The new diesel engines are laden with issues. IMHO, unless you really need it (working truck hauling heavy equipment daily) or you tow heavy (>15-16K lbs) and you do it often - a new 6.6L chevy or 7.3L Ford gasser will happily do the job with 1/4 of the drama. No "you used bad fuel, what did you expect" guilt trips, no EGR/emissions issues, no CP4 $12K repair failures, no turbo failures, no mystery coolant leaks. The new diesels are beasts for sure but do the math between a 8mpg new gasser towing and the 14mpg new diesel towing with current prices and $10K engine premium on diesel (plus oil/fuel filter/additive costs over the time of ownership) - the $10K premium turns into a $12-14K premium with the cost of diesel maintenance - takes years to make up the mileage difference - and I am not even talking expensive repairs on the diesel OR you have to keep buying extended warranties. The only thing that diesels have going is that people still think of them as reliable and they keep their resale value better.
ognend 04/16/21 07:36am Tow Vehicles
RE: F350 SRW Enough Truck

The new 6.6L chevy gasser or the 7.3L ford gasser are both potent towers. I would say anything up to 16,000 lbs and 3500-4000 hitch weight is OK to tow with these trucks. The new diesels are complex beasts that require crazy maintenance and are prone to pump, turbo, emissions etc. failures where you will either have to maintain an expensive warranty (extended) or eat up the cost - a CP4 failure on the new powerstrokes can easily cost you up to 12K to repair and ford has frequently denied these claims blaming bad fuel for the issues (it is the Bosch CP4 pump that has a problem so....). An F-350 SRW gasser or a 3500 Chevy SRW gasser should have payloads in the 3700-4000 lbs and plenty of towing capacity. At current gas and diesel prices assuming you tow about a 1,000 miles per month, you are looking at 80,000 miles to make up the $10K premium you pay for a diesel engine. Add to that the fact that most powerstroke people tell you to do oil changes every 5K miles ($150 at the dealer) and oil+fuel filters every 10K miles ($350 at the dealer), you are looking at extra $4,000 in maintenance over the course of the above-mentioned 80,000 miles. Did I mention lubrication additives with each diesel fuel-up? Boy, you think you are pampering a machine made out of gold! Anyway, this realistically means you will take 100,000 miles or 10 years to make up the diesel engine premium! And there are no risks of CP4, turbo, emissions etc. failures, no mystery coolant leaks... IMHO, only people towing > 16,000 lbs and people who work out of a truck (tow things daily like tractors, heavy equipment etc. to work sites) need a diesel. The whole myth of the "reliable and runs forever diesel" was built on the pre-2004 7.3L powerstroke and pre 2004 12/24v 5.9L Cummins engines - they were easy and cheap to maintain (but then they had the same torque output as the new 7.3L ford and 6.6L chevy gassers so you weren't getting anywhere in a hurry). Today's diesel engines put out 450+ HP and 1000 ft/lbs torque and are SUPER complicated. Just open the 6.7L engine bay and then open the 7.3L gasser engine bay. You could drop a screw driver in the former and never find it again...
ognend 04/16/21 06:09am Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

you will not find one single OEM Engineer that will have this conversation with you. Legal liabilities to mfg are extremely high, and that engineer would be fired on the spot. I gave you some suggestions to do your own research. What did you find doing a comparison between 1T and 3/4T. Crawl under the trucks and compare part numbers between same model year trucks. Good suggestions, thanks. I don't have access to many '16 Powerstrokes in different variants (250/350) unfortunately, just my own. But, I am not giving up...
ognend 04/13/21 08:22pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

Ognend....gvwr and gvwr based payload sticker numbers are always a hot item on rv websites. This from another rv website weight thread ..... grindstone01 Senior Member Join Date: Oct 2017 Location: FULL TIMERS Posts: 2,325 Registry *** I'm a retired auto engineer and Marketing has a big impact on GVWR. As a engineer, it was our job to make sure the frame, brakes and powertrain components were designed well above the GVWR ratings that Marketing wanted, so we would design in a safety factor for each component. You don't really think we would build a truck and then test it to determine what the surprise GVWR number should be! Axle ratings are also well above the GVWR rating and in commercial vehicles, axle ratings are the pay load determining factor and even they have a big safety factor designed into them. It would be unusual for a lawyer to accept a overweight case unless it was grossly over the safety factor weight and even then a vehicle manufacture would not share that info because it is not a hard fast number that will break if one more pound is added. There are many videos of million pound plus loads being moved by trucks across country. It's all about the axles.*** Your on the right track...so enjoy the truck/trailer combo. We really like our old '03 2500 Dodge/Cummins HO NV5600 manual tranny pulling our even older '97 11200-11400 lb rv trailer all over the USA. I wish I never sold my '06 Duramax - best and stoutest truck I ever owned. I have been trying to find an old IDI or pre-2003 TD to learn on, but boy, people are asking crazy money for them :)
ognend 04/13/21 04:44am Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

You want to exceed payload capacity, that's your business. I don't want to exceed the REAL payload capacity but I need to know what this REAL number is. I am questioning whether the number on the sticker is a REAL number or a number made to fit a GVWR limiting rating. In other words, is the sticker payload capacity just made up to make up the difference to 10,000 GVWR or is it a REAL number based on the ACTUAL components of the vehicle I own. Are you aware of all the suspension, tires, and axle differences between a higher capacity truck and your truck? It used to be, and it's been a long time since I looked, the 1 ton spring is slightly different to the 3/4 ton, with an extra leaf. I also know there are lower capacity tires available on both models. You also have to deal with GVWR differences between 1T and 3/4T. I believe the rear axle is the same for the same ratio. Instead of someone listing POSSIBLE differences, it would be nice if they could list the ACTUAL differences. Then we can have an ACTUAL conversation? In fact, it would not really be a conversation. If you can list the differences and explain to me why my truck can only take 2184lbs on the rear axle, I am selling it tomorrow, it's not like I was born in it.... :) You're convinced you're absolutely right and don't think Ford measured things correctly. I will tell you that most OEM engineers are generally top of the heap, getting recruited from all the top schools. I am not convinced in anything but it would be nice if we could sit down with the ACTUAL algorithm used at Ford to determine the payload capacity number. I find it extremely suspicious that my weight rating is EXACTLY 2184 lbs, for example. Look, I own my truck outright. As per KBB, I could probably get $50K for it. I could take that $50K and go get the new 7.3L Godzilla Ford or the new 6.6L Chevy gasser. Both are in the 3500-3700 lbs payload ratings, way more than what I need. They would be new trucks, with warranties etc. I would even probably have money left over to take the missus somewhere nice - most of the Chevys I would consider are in the $42-45K range, for example. But I need to know that I am going to be jumping through all these hoops for a reason. Thanks!
ognend 04/13/21 04:34am Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

The OP asks a technical question that requires a deep technical & engineering process answer, then dismisses it as too technical...only wanting an answer that fits what they want to hear...to which think they don’t truly know what they want to hear... Done with trying to help and blocking this one...bye... If you can point out where I rejected your deeply technical answer, I will gladly apologize. Thank you.
ognend 04/12/21 06:03pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

I am the OP. This all started with my own epiphany that you can have (on paper) a towing capacity of 15,000 lbs but the payload capacity (on paper/sticker) of only 2000 lbs or so. Since some trailers (mostly horse trailers with living quarters in front) are front heavy, it seems to me contradictory to have a vehicle that can tow behind it X lbs but at the point of attachment only take 1/7th of the lbs. So, I am faced with two choices: 1. "Obey" the sticker, sell the truck and buy one that has a bigger sticker! or 2. Try to understand how the payload capacity number is arrived at and after doing so, make an educated decision about what to do next. Someone pointed me to the RAWR - take your truck to the scales and get the proper payload capacity number scheme. I did so, months after I started the thread and by my calculations I actually have just the payload capacity in the latter scheme to haul the horse trailer I want. Then some jack * ss piled onto my revelation and started writing short replies about how I am picking numbers out of a hat (he must have thought were witty and insightful - they were not but they spurred on 3 more pages of discussion. Sigh.). P.S. I do not live and breathe the realm of trucks and towing and how they are certified etc. I am just a consumer. However, I feel that if I will "consume" a $60,000 vehicle, I might as well try to understand what, where, how and why. I was initially also worried about the legal aspect of the "am I overweight" equation but am no more... P.P.S. In my "journey", I have considered various options - buying a new gasser with the money I could get from my not-so-perfect diesel; buying an older IDI/TDI diesel from the pre-2000 era, so on and so on. However, I figured that right now I have a truck that works - and I may as well try to figure out if it will work for my application.
ognend 04/12/21 02:33pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

Just make up your own sticker and slap it over Fords and call it good. Looking online for someone to tell you it is OK..... Is hilarious. There will ALWAYS be someone that will agree with you.... But the ones that COUNT, are the Ford engineers. You say you are an engineer. So get a job with Ford and see if you can straighten them out. But see, I am not looking for someone to agree with me. To be honest, it would be nice to understand (for example), how the payload number has actually been arrived at. I asked you this in a previous reply - do you know? Is it a number (2184lbs in my case) that has been "made to fit" into the 10,000 lbs GVWR because of legal interpretations and the class of vehicle sold (3/4 ton truck) or is it the actual components and their combinations that make up this number. Can you actually answer that question? You keep telling me to join Ford to answer it - but can YOU actually answer it? If you can't - why are you still in this discussion? That's an honest question :) Another question: what is the relevance of 6100 lbs RAWR rating published on the same sticker? Can you answer that question? Why would I need to join Ford? I am not looking to strengthen a truck :). In fact, with the prices of used vehicles right now, I could easily sell this Ford for $50K (Kelley Blue book says $51K in private sale) and buy the new 7.3L gasser Ford or the 6.6L new Chevy gasser 3/4 ton truck and "instantly" get an official payload sticker of 3500-3700 lbs - for the weight I am towing, they would be perfectly adequate! I would STILL have the same questions, however - how were these numbers arrived at and are they real numbers dictated by components? Yes, there is some part of this equation of selling in a private sale and buying new (the hassle of doing all of these) that maybe I don't want to go through - so I am trying to figure out if whatever I have will work for my application - before I put myself through it all. Thanks.
ognend 04/12/21 04:40am Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

Sounds to me like you should get a job with Ford. Then you would be able to properly rate their vehicles. I bet they would love to have you on board. Sounds to me like you actually have nothing to offer in this discussion. I have not seen you say anything of consequence except offer short zingers, thinking they are funny.
ognend 04/12/21 03:50am Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

(for example, in some states 10,000 GVWR is some kind of a legal cutoff for things - how did the state arrive at this number? Why 10,000? Why not 10,500?). The answer is so obvious that even a Caveman/Engineer can get it. If they picked 10,500, then people would be complaining, saying "Why 10,500 instead of 10,000. They needed to pick a number, so they did. End of story. Yes but see an engineer would then wonder whether the numbers on the stickers (like payload capacity) are "engineered" to fit the 10,000 lbs (as in on paper) or if the components are actually engineered to fit the 10,000 number or...? In other words - are you actually physically building components/systems to fit within a number or are you slapping numbers on stickers just to make the numbers fit (regardless of what the actual components are)? The caveman, on the other hand, would just jump to the "end of story" conclusion, yeah? So, do you actually know the answer to the question above or are you just here to have some fun? ;) P.S. I should say that I came here wondering about legal limits and definitions but ended up more interested in what my truck can handle - supported by actual engineering/numbers.
ognend 04/11/21 07:57pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

don't like the number on the door sticker, you just get to pick a new number? Interesting way of dealing with payload capacity. And this is an overtly ignorant statement, obviously backed by your lack of knowledge about vehicle construction and specifications. ROFLMAO, <-- multi decade OEM Sr Engineer, currently working on powertrains. See, I am picking a number because I do not understand the way my payload capacity number was picked in the first place. How did Ford arrive at 2184 lbs and not 2180 or 2190 or 2185? If they published ALL the factors that go into coming up with this number, I would not have to pick it, would I? If you can explain the process, please do. Thanks! P.S. I am an engineer as well and I know that many times numbers are not arrived at solely based on components - there is a lot of legal implications to what things are published and why (for example, in some states 10,000 GVWR is some kind of a legal cutoff for things - how did the state arrive at this number? Why 10,000? Why not 10,500?). Also, why publish a RAWR number if all I am supposed to look at is a payload capacity number? Is the latter for legal purposes only (to fit into the 10,000 GVWR calculation) or is it an actual calculation based on components, tolerances etc.? Or am I just blindly to assume things? If I am going to own a $60,000 piece of hardware, do I not have the right to know EXACTLY how a certain number was arrived at? Or do I just get to be laughed at by some jumped up engineer who thinks that we are all too dumb to understand things so (s)he will not bother to explain the process? I guess I am not too dumb to pay $60K for a vehicle but too dumb to understand the calculations? Thanks!
ognend 04/11/21 06:07pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

If 36# is that important to you.... You need a bigger truck. I don't understand. Why do I need a bigger truck? :)Trust me on this. I genuinely do not understand. What are you trying to say? If you have nothing of consequence to contribute here or you are not willing to state it clearly, why are you wasting everyone's time? Start your own thread? :)
ognend 04/10/21 07:29pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Towing capacity vs max cargo weight rating

If 36# is that important to you.... You need a bigger truck. I don't understand. Why do I need a bigger truck? :)
ognend 04/10/21 05:12pm Tow Vehicles
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