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 > Your search for posts made by 'ognend' found 112 matches.

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RE: Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

As I was out walking my pupster. i'm recalling that many of the 8 lug SW/DW rigs do not come std with a spare tire in the past. Did you order a spare, thats 60-80 lbs right there!! Did you get one of the very basic option packages with AC, upgrade radio etc? thats potentially another 40-60 lbs of added weight, lost payload to your truck brochure payload! Did you put after market spray on undercoating on your truck? Line-x on the steel bed? extended camper mirrors? If the backup camera is an option.....that's 5-10 lbs of lost payload! I'm sure that 100 lbs of missing payload are option(s) you are not including in your numbers. Marty Marty, thanks. Yes, power windows, backup camera, that's about it. No spare tire. I guess I am happy to be within a 100 lbs, huh? ;)
ognend 08/26/21 08:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

i have a 2007 f350. it has a different frame as well as several more leafs in the spring pack. with 5000 lbs pinweight it does not touch the helper spring except over bumps. terrible ride but i am in the process of modifications that hopefully will help. crazy about the flatbed. Yeah, I like mine. Taking possession of a brand new Palomino HS-2902 Max at the end of September and taking horses camping out West during winter. Here is a shot of mine.
ognend 08/26/21 05:25pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

Which interior PKG did you get? I can see and have heard of 1000 lbs difference between a stripped no added options, vs loaded with ALL options in a crew cab. Their were three of us with 2005 crew cab duallies on here at one time, lightest red a few option in the 71XX relm, my LS 4WD 7400 and iirc a bit over 7600 for a full leather PKG LT version. If you WB is 6-8" longer than a typical box delete rig, that adds a few lbs for extra framing. Same if over hangs is longer.... 68 gal tank vs 35-40 gal tank......all of those add up to less payload, everything else being equal per say. Marty I got the most basic W/T - vinyl seats/floor, it is cab/chassis with CA 60" crew cab 4x4. The odd thing is that an equivalent DRW with a standard 8ft bed lists at 6610lbs payload. I would expect to gain about 500lbs payload by deleting the bed/tailgate (?) and then lose 1230lbs by slapping on my steel flatbed (which manufacturer confirmed weighs 1230lbs). My expectation was to end up at 5880lbs. I got the 23.5 gallon extra tank so that's another 188lbs for gas and probably 40-50 for the tank itself. I have heavy mudflaps on back wheels - another 50 lbs. Finally my wife and I detract 270 lbs combined. Bumper pull WD hitch another 30-40 lbs and then underseat storage under 100 and I am at 5300lbs. As per scale I am at 5200 lbs payload so I cannot account for a 100lbs give or take. I think I am OK with that.
ognend 08/26/21 04:17pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

I bought a 2020 Crew Cab 3500 cab and chassis, LTZ last year. I didn't order it that way, it was an order that was turned down when it arrived and I bought it. I don't know if it was how mine was ordered, but I had a heck of a time getting the back up camera to work. Took the dealer a while to figure it out. The components that make the back up camera work are not there in a cab and Chassis and more importantly the software is not in the computer either. Make sure you work through that now before you order it. Maybe they fixed the issue for the 2021 models but it was a pain to make it happen. You will thank me. I love the truck though. I took possession of the truck a few months back and I love it. Backup camera works flawlessly :)
ognend 08/26/21 12:18pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

All things equal, a cab and chassis should wieght less as you note, no bed on it. BUT with that said, in the past, some C&C frames were a bit thicker in metal. So potential is there to wieght more as it sits. A nice thing about C&C trucks, is they are easier to get max door sticker GVWR! A proper licensed body manufacture can change tires, springs, etc. Make the gvwr be equal to the axle ratings. A bit harder with a completed rig from the factory. An 8' 1200 lb bed is on the heavy side even for a flatbed. I also don't know what's included in that wieght. It could be on par for what it is too. Marty Sorry, I should have been more specific, it is a 9ft4" flatbed, I just confirmed with the manufacturer (Hillsboro) that it does indeed weigh 1230lbs. I took the truck again to the scales this morning and wife and I (270lbs combined) and 63.5 gallons of gas come in at 8800lbs. This gives me a payload of 5200lbs. I cannot reconcile this with advertised payload of 6610lbs as per chevrolet website - if I assume bed+tailgate weight at 500 lbs, this means I should be at 5900lbs, not 5200lbs. Oh well.
ognend 08/26/21 12:17pm Tow Vehicles
Cab/chassis vs standard DRW

Do Cab&Chassis trucks weigh more than standard DRW trucks (all other things equal)? I bought a 2021 3500 Chevy DRW cab/chassis gasser, crew cab, 4x4. The stated payload on Chevy's website for an "equivalent" gasser (3500 DRW, crew cab, 4x4) is 6610 lbs, stated GVWR is 14,000lbs. Since my vehicle is "incomplete", can I assume the same payload (6610 lbs) plus whatever the weight of the "deleted" bed would be on the equivalent 8ft pickup, minus whatever flatbed I installed? In practical terms, I have a Hillsboro GII steel bed that weighs 1230lbs. If I assume that the 8ft DRW bed weighs 500lbs, can I do 6610lbs + 500 lbs - 1230 lbs = payload of 5880lbs on my cab/chassis equivalent? Thanks!
ognend 08/25/21 07:18pm Tow Vehicles
RE: New to truck camping - Palomino HS 2902 with flatbed?

I would also go with D-rings, you could take them with you with bolts and install them after camper is loaded. Can you back your truck under the camper or will you have to put it on with a forklift? You may need wide swing out brackets. I am not sure I understand the question about backing under vs forklift - I don't have a forklift nor was I planning on buying one - my understanding was that I would be backing under it after I buy it (?). Thanks!
ognend 06/26/21 04:07pm Truck Campers
RE: New to truck camping - Palomino HS 2902 with flatbed?

It’s going to be difficult without the camper unless you have some detailed measurements . If you can remove the sides to pick up the camper perhaps you can find a temporary place to hook the tie downs . You definitely want them inboard of the flatbed sides so your side panels can close . Most campers have a drop down at the rear of the floor at the 8’ mark which means you’re going to need a spacer between headboard and camper with that 9’ bed . Best to have the camper first before doing to much customizing . Understood. The dealer was going to take care of everything, it's just that I got a bit suspicious after they asked about how sturdy the sides are. Call me paranoid but I would not trust 3800 lbs on a folding side latch. Maybe I am wrong, who knows.
ognend 06/26/21 04:06pm Truck Campers
RE: New to truck camping - Palomino HS 2902 with flatbed?

Thank you! The D-ring idea sounds good to me. I am just trying to figure out where I would put these D-rings.
ognend 06/26/21 11:47am Truck Campers
New to truck camping - Palomino HS 2902 with flatbed?

Hello! I am totally new to truck camping. Have a 2021 Chevy 3500 cab&chassis crew cab with a 9ft4" flatbed (Hillsboro GII model). I put in an order for a 2021 Palomino HS-2902 - will be ready in late September/early October. The service guy at the dealer (OutpostRV in Indiana) asked me a curious question after seeing the photo of my truck - "This will work fine. The sides look foldable, are they sturdy?". I said "I hope so, they are foldable and made of steel". Since I am totally new - this question gave me pause - they are a solid 9 hour drive away (this was the best price I could find - local dealer wanted $3,000 more for the same camper!) - and I want to understand how the camper will connect to the truck and why he needs the sides to be sturdy. The sides to fold out but what gave me pause is the fact that they are foldable and I am wondering if the whole 3-4,000 lbs will be depending on the latch not opening while the TC is connected, because I don't think the sides were designed to take the stress of so much weight. Does anyone have any ideas or photos of their rigs, guides online etc. that explain the torklift connections on the flatbeds and whether my flatbed will work for this application? Thanks! Image of truck with bed
ognend 06/26/21 05:08am Truck Campers
RE: Virginia GCWR rules / commercial / travel trailer

I got the f350 srw 11300 gvwr, if registered that way it is right at $100 more to register annually. Tell them 10000 gvwr and a cheaper registration annually. Yeah but what happens if you are pulled over and they realize your tags don't match real GVWR? Besides I am talking about a 14,000 lbs gvwr dually ;) Yeah:S. Because that happens so often I've never seen nor heard of it happening to anyone in 40 years of driving. Slap your head all you want ;) but what you are suggesting is technically fraud (tax evasion), no? I know my vehicle is 14,000 lbs GVWR, it says so on the sticker and I go and tell them it is 10,000 lbs GVWR... No shooting offense but why willingly put yourself in a situation where you can be dragged through the system. I am pretty sure nobody will pull you over for fun and check your tags for correct weights but it MAY happen if you were involved in a (serious) accident, no?
ognend 06/13/21 07:07am Travel Trailers
RE: Virginia GCWR rules / commercial / travel trailer

I got the f350 srw 11300 gvwr, if registered that way it is right at $100 more to register annually. Tell them 10000 gvwr and a cheaper registration annually. Yeah but what happens if you are pulled over and they realize your tags don't match real GVWR? Besides I am talking about a 14,000 lbs gvwr dually ;)
ognend 06/13/21 05:15am Travel Trailers
RE: Virginia GCWR rules / commercial / travel trailer

I don't think you register the truck for the weight it's towing. You register the truck for the weight it's axles are supporting. Is this a GN or FW trailer? The rules might be different for that but I think the truck is only registered for it's GVWR. That's how all my trucks and trailers have been for over 20 years. But, I don't have any GN or FW trailers. My dually (it's registered commercial) has a GVWR of 11,400 but I have it registered at 14,000. My 24' flatbed is registered for it's GVWR of 16,xxx pounds. When I have my dually loaded heavy and the trailer hitched up it sometimes puts the truck just over 13,000 which is why I registered it for 14,000. Thus, I maintain my Class A CDL from my truck driving days even though I'm an electrical contractor now. My understanding is that in Virginia, you title for GVWR and register (get tags) for GCWR. So, if you have 3 trailers, one weighs 3k lbs, one weighs 6k lbs and one weighs 10k lbs and you have a 3500 drw with gvwr of 14k lbs, you would tag for the highest GCWR combo - 24k lbs - this way you are covered all the way to the highest gvwr of the trailer and thus, highest gcwr.
ognend 06/12/21 06:12pm Travel Trailers
RE: Virginia GCWR rules / commercial / travel trailer

I'm in VA. You aren't commercial because you aren't doing anything that can produce income. You will register your truck and trailer just like any "normal" person would register any other truck or trailer. However, If you have the vehicles registered to a business or lettered for a business or go to a competition where you can win money then you will be considered commercial and you would need a Class A CDL. That would make sense to me. So, when I register my truck, I would register it for the highest weight below 26,000 lbs? This would only allow me to legally pull up to 12,000lbs? What if I want to put a 15,000 lbs trailer behind the truck? Would I register it for 30,000 lbs, for example? This would not interfere with any driver's license requirements, if you were pulled over? Thanks!
ognend 06/12/21 05:51pm Travel Trailers
Virginia GCWR rules / commercial / travel trailer

Hello. Anyone in Virginia who can opine on this? I am getting ready to buy a 1ton cab and chassis dually and put a flatbed on it. I also have a 14,000 lbs horse trailer I want to pull and travel with. How is this treated in the eyes of DMV/state police? I see here (https://www.dmv.virginia.gov/drivers/#whatiscdl.asp) that a commercial vehicle is defined as "A combination of vehicles with a gross combination weight rating (GCWR) of 26,001 pounds or more if the vehicle(s) being towed has a GVWR of more than 10,000 pounds". The dually has a GVWR of 14,000lbs and the trailer's GVWR is also 14,000 lbs (combined 28,000 lbs). Does this mean that this now puts me in the "commercial" category? If so, what implications does this have? Do I need a CDL to drive this "rig"? How do I register my truck? We do not make money with the truck, it is just for personal purposes - driving around and hauling our horses to trails (but not shows or any activity where money can be earned). Thanks!
ognend 06/12/21 02:21pm Travel Trailers
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

You edited the post after my intial reply and made this about a fuel pump. Yeah, so that leaves only Ford shipping CP4s -- which have received incremental year to year improvements, by the way. The majority of your whole argument against diesels is the fuel pump, which falls apart here. Duramax moved away from CP4 in 17, I think. The title of this thread is "OPERATIONAL PROBLEMS WITH NEW DIESEL PICKUPS". I literally listed all the operational problems with 2011-onwards diesel pickups ("new"). I explained the cost of ownership of a "new" diesel pickup vs gasser and how many miles/years it would take to make up the $10K premium of a diesel engine vs a gasser engine. I explained that the new 2020+ gas engines are potent tow-ers with plenty of HP and torque, that can easily satisfy the towing needs of the general - occasional - towing public that tows weights below, let's say 16-18,000 lbs. I also explained that the new gas engines are also much cheaper to operate and maintain and do not suffer from all the drama associated with the new diesels. IMHO the diesel truck manufacturers have been focusing on the wrong objectives - competing on extra lbs of towing capacity and higher torque. Instead, they should be competing on reliability and quality. But those things are not easy to measure. You can't say "New Duramax is 17.3% more reliable". What is much easier to say is "New Duramax has leading torque in its class, exceeding the competition by 17 ft/lbs of torque and 12 HP". In essence, they are competing on "whose is bigger" and the unwashed masses that are conditioned to lap this up - are lapping it up. As for your claim that I am overstating the CP4 problems - there are literally millions and millions of trucks out there with a ticking time bomb (the CP4 pump) - all powerstrokes from 2011-2021, Duramaxes from 2011-2016 and Cummins from 2014 and onwards. That's a lot of potentially expensive repairs for a hell of a lot of people. Ford is embroiled in a class action lawsuit, so is GM. RAM is probably next. You telling me that my beef is with a pump, not a fuel system is silly. Diesels can be great but they are NOT great in millions and millions of vehicles sold in the last 10+ years. What about emissions systems? Plenty of expensive repairs in that arena as well. Why do you think half of these trucks are deleted, despite the fact that it is illegal to do so? You grossly overexaggerate the issues. I could equally say that you are understating the problems. I could say that your whole premise has been "I am rich and buy what I want and I want a diesel and if you can't afford it, buy a gasser"? Although you also said "buy the right tool for the job". So, one of us must be confused ;) For most of the fools out there towing, say, 8-15,000 lbs once or twice a month to the local campgrounds within a 500 mile radius and whose trucks otherwise do not work for a living hauling equipment around construction sites etc. - please explain to me why the diesel is the right tool for the job (righter) than the new 2020+ gasser like the 7.3L Ford or the 6.6L Chevy. Esp. at the $10K premium right off the bat and the much higher maintenance/operational cost down the road. On Ram, there are three different transmissions, three different transfer cases, and two different rear axles in use for 2019+MY. Don't know about Ford. Generally, diesel parts across the board are strengthened to deal with the additional torque. These are bogus claims, of course. Diesel engine have higher torques so they have strenghtened parts - well, you are explaining why - to deal with higher torques and the heavier weight of the engine. I have never heard of a higher axle or frame or transfer case or anything else failure rate in gassers than in diesel, don't be silly :)
ognend 04/17/21 03:25am Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

In summary, it sounds like you had a poor experience with a Powerstroke 6.7 that you bought, and swore off all diesel engines after that. I actually still own the truck. I am just not blind to what is happening in the world of diesel and gas engines ;)
ognend 04/16/21 08:53pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

I'm not gullible enough to buy a Powerstroke. People are having the same issues with the new Cummins trucks. In fact, RAM switched back to a CP3 pump. Duramaxes are having the same issues as well. Around $10K, but who buys a BMW or any german car without expecting repairs? You can swap both Duramax and Cummins to CP3 if the CP4 keeps you up at night. I think you are proving yourself what I am saying. You just spent $80K buying a "German" only to spend more thousands on crippling it back to a lesser fuel pump, to protect it from an expensive failure. How about the emissions systems failures? Plenty of those as well. An argument against a particular fuel pump is not a valid argument against a fuel. Fuel pump, emissions systems, complexity, cost of ownership.... Buy the right tool for the job. I'm not telling anyone what to buy. I'm saying that the issues with diesel engines are not as common as you portray, and that you fail to acknowledge that some things are bought because they're wanted, not needed. Above you just told me that you are buying luxury and that people are buying "wants". Now you are telling me to buy the right tool for the job - which is what I have been saying all along. If you are towing < 15-16K lbs and you are doing it casually (like 90% of Americans), 2020+ gassers like the 7.3L Ford or the 6.6L Chevy or even the 6.4L RAM with the new ZF 8-sp tranny are the tool for the job. You can even camp and put away the savings from the diesels into your retirement fund. They do, but it's not anywhere close. And every one I've towed with has had to scream to utilize it with anything marginally steep or heavy. However did we tow things back when the "legendary" and "indestructible" diesels didn't have exhaust brakes? ;) There is a whole lot more to this than payload/GVWR even if you aren't discussing being overweight. Longevity will vary between parts, with the heavier parts usually lasting longer under similar loading. And for those of us who spend a lot of time off-road, the transfer cases and axles are often of great value. I don't want to snap a shaft with a heavy camper while crawling off a small shelf. Point to an example of a 3/4 ton or 1-ton SRW where the tranny or the axle or whatever is "heavier duty" in a diesel than in an equivalent gasser.
ognend 04/16/21 08:51pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Operational problems with new diesel pickups

To say they are laden with issues is a blatant exaggeration. Spend some time on the Powerstroke 6.7L facebook group or on any powerstroke online forums. What is the first recommendation you get on these forums? Install a CP4 disaster kit or a fass lift pump. 2nd recommendation? Delete the emissions system. 3rd recommendation? Oil changes every 5K and fuel filter changes every 10K miles and DO NOT FORGET TO USE A LUBRICATING ADDITIVE (!). If these new diesels were so great and reliable, why spend $3-4K on these changes (and void warranty and go illegal)? Why accelerate the manufacturer recommended maintenance schedule? Ford says you don't need to use an additive but will not cover the CP4 pump failures... My '16 Powerstroke had TSB 16-0041 at 4,000 miles (emissions system). At 15,000 miles a new water pump. At 30,000 miles a left lean bank sensor. At 40,000 miles a slow coolant leak that nobody has been able to find and I am now at 52,000 miles. Is it leaking out of the radiator cap? Out of the radiator inlet? At the off-gas bottle cap? At any of the hose fittings? Maybe it is leaking into the intercooler? Who knows? The engine is so crammed you can't see anything and it passing all the pressure tests.... And not everything is about cost... you don't buy a Corvette over a Spark for economy, yet they sell plenty of them and don't kick up the same amount of dust the diesel vs gas debate does. Sure, if you have money coming out of your ears, it is never about cost ;). Besides, you are talking about extremes (Corvette vs Spark but there are MANY alternatives in between at all different cost points). I am talking about two classes of vehicles - one that fits most people's needs (esp. with the new 7.3L Ford gas and 6.6L Chevy gas offerings) and another - that has become a super expensive monstrosity that is not even that reliable anymore. I had a CP4 failure covered under warranty on my 335D So you did have a CP4 failure? ;) What was the bill? $10K? $12K? Lucky you warranty covered it. Ford is not covering them, that's why there is a class action lawsuit. after that converted my GM LML to a CP3, and will do the same for my Ram when the warranty is up. Why? If diesels are so reliable..... I have absolutely no concerns about my diesel I was talking about money - what modern diesels cost to maintain/operate and the issues they are seeing. Vehicles, with few possible exceptions, are pay to play, and people buy what they want. Very few buy just what they need, or else there would be a lot more people hauling with basic work trucks and commuting in econoboxes. People buy what they are programmed to buy or what others tell them to buy. "Hey guys, I bought a 10K lbs travel trailer, what truck do I get???". "Buy a diesel! They last forever and they have awesome power!". I am here to tell you that this "diesels are indestructible" myth is based on old and simple diesel machines of the pre-2004 era - those were cheap AND simple to operate! New ones? Nope. Like my 1970 Massey Ferguson tractor with the legendary Perkins diesel engine - compare that to today's emissions laden Masseys that mandate that a farmer has at least two tractors - a new one and a 50 year old one for when the new one fails.... IMHO most people have no idea about towing capacities and payloads. They just buy whatever they think is adequate or whatever they have heard from someone is adequate (salesman, online RV forum, whatever). If people bought based on educated decisions (cost of ownership, payloads, towing capacities etc. etc.) - most would NOT own a today's diesel. Two final points: The value of exhaust braking in modern diesels should not be overlooked if you are traveling in the mountains I agree, easier to tow with an exhaust brake but gassers have natural engine retardation so that counts for something at least. Diesel variants usually come with stronger transmissions, transfer cases, axles, etc, and that is part of the premium Hmmm. An F-250 gasser and F-350 gasser (in the SRW version) will almost always be rated for more payload because the gas engine is lighter than the diesel so at least in "legal" ratings with in a particular GVWR it will have more payload. The 7.3L Godzilla gasser Ford comes with the same 10-sp tranny as the equivalent Powerstroke. As far as I am aware, the same axles etc, are in the gassers and diesels up to and including the 1 ton trucks. A lot of the time they get artificially de-rated (on paper) to fit a lesser class of truck. It would not make any sense for the manufacturer to use different axles on an equivalent F-250 or F-350 gasser/diesel trucks. In fact, the "new" 10-sp tranny used by 2020/2021 Ford gasser/diesel offerings is built by GM and there is a rumor of a 10sp 6.6L Chevy gasser for 2022....
ognend 04/16/21 08:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: F350 SRW Enough Truck

I was referring to my 15 RAM/CUMMINS. My coolant interval is 150k same with valve adjust. I also understand being able to easily work on my engine compared to others. Sorry, when I say "newer" diesels I mean the CP4 diesels, don't know much about Cummins. The official coolant interval per Ford manual is 105K miles I think but people are doing it at 30-50K all in the hope that the engines will last what the old 7.3Ls did. It's become stupid at this point, over maintenance and all but apparently the consensus is that either they work all day every day or if you are a casual pavement princess or low-milage tower, then excess maintenance is in order.... what do I know.... For some unknown reason Cummins went from the CP3 to the CP4 in 2019 & 2020 and back to CP3 2021. It's not an unknown reason - the reason is the excessive amount of CP4 failures.
ognend 04/16/21 06:20pm Tow Vehicles
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