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 > Your search for posts made by 'pnichols' found 367 matches.

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RE: Modify OR Access Easily Over cab Bed for the Older Camper

I have been thinking about this issue my self. Most all the small class C’s have this corner bed and would not work well for two older people so one would have to sleep somewhere else. Has anyone tried reclining the front seat and using that to get down in the middle of the night? Can you step on the couch then to the reclined front seat to get up and down.? Our 24 ft. Class C has a dinette that easily converts into a full bed in addition to a rear corner queen bed and a cabover queen bed. A couple could sleep one in the rear corner queen bed and one in the dinette full bed if neither on one wanted to use the cabover bed.
pnichols 01/18/21 04:19pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: TR: Utah, parks, friends and a few weeks with my wife

Dave (the OP) ... a nice post and great photos!! We've beening RVing for around 40 years - mostly in the Western U.S. - and I thoroughly get what you're hinting at regarding "things not being the same" anymore when trying to get away from it all on trips. There's just too many people out and about in too many vehicles using too much Internet telling them where to go. We specifically try to get way out there in our small Class C MH - usually because we're rockhounds looking for rocks. Our worst yet was 25 miles each way traveling to/from a remote spot in the Oregon outback on extreme wash-board traveling 7-10 MPH. But was it ever spectacular camping out there under the stars with a shower, air conditioning, a furnace, cold drinks, a BBQ grill, and queen beds!
pnichols 01/18/21 11:44am Truck Campers
RE: Apocalypse almost

Are you 'solo"? We have 2 cells phones so odds of one failing is less of a problem *Unless system wide outage We also travel with two cell phones ... plus a Garmin satellite emergency SOS and texting communicator ... plus air evacuation insurance if we are able to communicate during medical emergencies. One should always have a Plan A and a Plan B ... and ideally probably a Plan C. We were RV traveling with friends once when they got stuck merely just off the highway in a soft shoulder. We could barely get out over our phones right here in the good old U.S. of A.. Plan for the worst, and hope for the best.
pnichols 01/15/21 08:58pm Technology Corner
RE: Wall mount electric heater

Does anyone run a wall mount electric heater? What about the ones that look like a glade plug in? We've got an 18' travel trailer we'd like to keep warm in the spring/fall. The Gas furnace is just too powerful in my opinion. Its either 75/80 degrees inside or off. The campers too small for the gas furnace. It warms it up nice and quick when we want it warm. At 2am we wake up in a sauna. The last couple seasons ive been using a cheap duraflame heater i picked up for $20 or so at TSC. It works well but its always in the way. Something on the wall would be great as an 18' camper has its own storage issues. Just curious if anyone else has this problem. Input is appreciated. It sounds like you have perfect gas furnace heating capacity in your little trailer. In other words - a furnace that is sized generously enough such that it can keep you comfortable in any cold weather situation that you should ever encounter. I'd much rather have this situation in an RV than an under-sized furnace situation. That being said ... however what you have is a temperature control problem for that great gas furnace. Install, or have installed, a digital thermostat to replace what you probably have -> just a simple slider type "analog" type control that is probably not operating properly or is just plain getting worn out. For comparison, the digital control in our small Class C turns the furnace ON if it detects an interior temperature one degree BELOW what we have it set for, and turns the furnace OFF if it detects an interior temperature two degrees ABOVE what we have it set for. This is a tight 3 degree temperature band that keeps us real comfortable. Digital RV gas furnace controls are not expensive. I suggest you try this first before considering other heaters.
pnichols 01/14/21 06:40pm General RVing Issues
RE: Modify OR Access Easily Over cab Bed for the Older Camper

Have a 2011 24ft Fleetwood DSL on Sprinter Chassis. Forever I have been looking for a safe way for older folks to get into and out of top bunk (the lift up bed above the cab). The ladder won't work for us. We did use a secured rope to pull us up and let us down but searching for ladder with feet.. well its not safe. I have researched bunk bed stairs and other clever ideas. I would love to modify this top bed into drop down but the built in part looks very complicated to remove. Maybe it is not. I doubt seriously if hubbie would let me even attempt that. lol So every once in awhile I get looking again. Of course with all the head room in cab the upper bunk is too high to just stand on sofa and get up...I bet there is some clever solution out there? I even thought of motorized lift chair thing..some wild ideas appreciated. I am thinking the best solution for old folks would be a drop down bed...??? I believe this link might show your motorhome's floorplan: https://www.rvt.com/Fleetwood-Jamboree-DSL-24D-2011-Forest-City-IA-ID9654648-UX77725 If the above is your floorplan, then it's almost identical to our Itasca's floorplan, except our dinette area isn't in a slide but it's in the spot your's is in. Doesn't your dinette make into a full size bed like ours does? Ours makes into a nice full size bed, especially if we lay an additional layer of foam on the dinette cushions which are used as this bed's mattress. I'm 6'2" and have slept in it. For what it's worth, I'm 78 and use our overhead cab bed all the time. Our ladder has flat steps in it so they don't dig into the pads of my feet at all. As an idea - how about using two ladders held side by side, with two sets of anchor brackets, to get up into and down out of the upper bed. This would be much safer because of the extra width - put one foot on one ladder and the other foot on the other ladder ... this would provide better stability when going up and down.
pnichols 01/12/21 09:09pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best tire inflator for dually tires

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pnichols 01/10/21 06:10pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: AGM and golf carts vs. Lithium Battery Test

MIGO TMI..heh. He packs so much tech data in so fast it's impossible to evaluate. And I am a tech tho not of the electrical variety. One thing I fished out of the flood was that the cheap 6V golf cart batteries were the most cost efficient. Strange that he didn't include Trojans or another high quality brand into the test. He then launches into the life cycle cost analysis. That's where I gave up. I have to admit that I have suspicions that this fellow is in the pocket of Battleborn. The info about 6V batteries was inserted in a very fleeting manner, almost as if he was hiding it. As for life cycle I will admit that if you keep your RV for 20 years or so then yes, Lithiums may pay for themselves. But most of us will not. And even if you have to replace your 6V battery pack once or twice over your time in the RV the costs will never approach the $4000 LiB battery pack price. I have never been a fan of AGM, they are designed to start a vehicle not store energy. Golf cart batteries are designed to store power and so are the LiB. So I'll stick with 6V unless the price of LiB plummets. Something I doubt will happen because of the scarcity of lithium. Of course ... you know that AGM batteries in 6V golf cart sizes for true deep cycle use are available? These 6V type/size AGM batteries definitely are not intended for vehicle starting. The 12V AGM batteries in our MH also have nothing to do with vehicle starting - they are labeled and specified to be specifically intended for deep cycle applications. They also charge fast because of their low internal resistance. FWIW, lithium batteries are noted for holding a higher terminal voltage right down to their total discharge point. This is not always a good thing, as this can be a problem for knowing how much charge they have left because it's more complicated to tell when they're getting low - unless they're monitored with equipment that keeps track of current consumed versus time while in use. i.e. For the AGM batteries in our MH, I just check their terminal voltage with a simple, inexpensive digital voltmeter in order to tell how low in charge they are.
pnichols 01/10/21 03:14pm Tech Issues
RE: Forrester 2151SLE

Hi Cardinals, Regarding your floor plan. One thing you will want to get a fitment for is the driver seat when the slide out is put away. For such a design, the slide out will interfere with the adjustment of the seat. It is a common complaint with taller people, sometimes so bad that they regret their purchase. With the slide out put away, sit in the driver seat, set it as far back as you deem most comfortable, then adjust the back rest to a comfortable driving position. You might find that you cannot position the seat properly for your driving comfort. My wife and I are turning 63 this year. Our floor plan is very similar to the one you are considering. As others have stated, the rear corner bed is going to become a bigger and bigger challenge as we get older and older. So far, so good for us. We are not overweight people with good hips and knees so our mobility is still good. But who knows what the future holds for us. You will want to determine the model year of the Ford E350 or E450 chassis. The chassis could be one model year older having the older 6.8L-V10 engine. Or it could be a current model year with the new 7.3L-V8 engine that is more powerful and more fuel efficient. The past 1.5 years has been a "transition" period for the Ford E350 and E450 chassis, so new motor homes being sold today could have older technology or the latest chassis technology with their associated benefits in fuel efficiency, performance, and comfort. If your rig is for just two people, I strongly advise to avoid a design with a large front over-head bunk. The long winded post below will clarify this comment. The post also needs a little update-tweaking on some chassis specs to reflect 2021. Ron, I have a different perspective with respect to your sentence above advising against a large front over-head bunk. There's two of us and one small dog on our RV trips in our 24 foot Class C of the "classic design" (with the normal full queen bed above the cab). The wife has back problems so she gets the entire corner bed in the back, and as such has plenty of maneuvering room when sleeping in it and wiggle-room for getting into and out of it. I get to use the entire overhead cab bed for sleeping and it's a whole bunch of room for sleeping. The wife is 75 and I'm 78. Winnebago even designed in a switch right by the overhead cab bed that turns on a floor light back by the bathroom to light my path for nighttime toilet trips. By the way, the complete "classic" overhead cab area in a Class C is an excellent design for shading the entire cab area and hence keeping the sun off the cab area when traveling and camped during warm weather. When traveling I push the back half of the overhead cab bed slightly upwards and forward a couple of feet so as to rest it up onto the front half and thus expose the underbed floor cutout that makes it easy to enter and exit the cab seats while nearly standing up. When traveling we can secure and store a lot of soft stuff on the remaining overhead cab bed surface area and on the two overhead cab floor "wings" that stick out slightly above the driver and passenger seats. We love our two queen beds for each of us to sleep in. We have occasionally had to use the additional full bed we get by dropping the hinged dinette tabletop and spreading out the seat cushions to make the mattress for it. Our small dog-person sleeps and travels in her own crate sitting on one of the dinette seats secured with a seatbelt. FWIW and somewhat related, there's an excellent video somewhere on YouTube showing how an older couple lives full time in a 24 foot classic Class C, with most/a lot of it being drycamping. It's very interesting how they do it in complete comfort for two adults.
pnichols 01/09/21 12:05pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: New E450

Or ... instead of ceramic coating the exhaust ... merely install metal heat shields right above the exhausts to keep the hot air from rising up to heat the underside of the doghouse. Our Class C's E450 chassis came from Winnebago with heat shields between the cab floor and exhausts, and the doghouse has never been warm enough to be of any concern. I'm not sure who installed the heat shields - Ford or Winnebago? When traveling in hot weather, we can always split some of the A/C's air flow down to the floor using the dash controls.
pnichols 01/06/21 10:45am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Small Class C on Truck Chassis?

Here's a 1969 chassis mount camper that we got cheap from some friends and used for a few years way back when. I eventulally sold it for a $1.00 bill to a young couple in which the husband was good with old vehicles. It had one TERRIBLE design flaw - no park gear in that GMC chassis as built by the factory. All I had was the parking brake and turning the front wheels into the curb (if there was a curb) whenever parked on a grade: https://i.imgur.com/ztekj3rl.jpg
pnichols 01/03/21 03:59pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Batteries in parallel and series

Here's how to interconnect multiple 12V batteries together for the proper current balancing between them. The diagrams are for 12V batteries, but for a battery bank made up of 6V batteries just substitue two 6V batteries connected in series with each other to represent each rectangle in the diagrams: http://www.smartgauge.co.uk/batt_con.html
pnichols 01/02/21 08:37pm Tech Issues
RE: HAPPY NEW YEARS eBay Hoot link

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Battery-Hydrometer-Golf-Cart-Tester-Improvement-Liquid-Get-Better-Readings-Now/284132110299?hash=item422797efdb:g:spIAAOSw4BZf7F3~ After a year of mean, nasty, news and division I got up this morning, poured a cup of coffee while surfing then slopped some in my lap after a laughing coughing fit. This 8s every bit as good as... "Simply pour the liquid into your oil, and remove the spark plugs and drop 4 pellets into each cylinder. Your cylinders will be plated and your engine restored to like new performance" David, That link looks like it improves hydrometer readings for liquid acid batteries. I went one better years ago on a couple liquid acid batteries that came stock in our Class C eight months after we bought it new and the batteries failed. I poured some kind of battery patent medicine liquid in them to "restore" them (way beyond improving hydrometer readings). ;) Of course they weren't "restored". I replaced them with good quality AGM batteries and have had many Happy New Years ever since.
pnichols 01/01/21 02:28pm Tech Issues
RE: What are your opinions on the new Ekko ?

If I was to order a new AWD Ekko, I'd insist before I closed the deal .... that the dealer check with Ford as how much larger diameter tires could be used on it and still clear the fender wells and front suspension components and, if blessed by the factory ... deliver my Ekko with those tires on it, including a spare tire of the larger size.
pnichols 12/31/20 08:42pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Buying a Former Rental Class C. How many of us out there?

I purchased a four winds Majestic 2011 28a last year, 120.000 miles on it I had to replace all of the tires, all new Bilstein shocks.rear camera,TV mount, 3 Vent covers, Roadmaster Reflex Steering Stabilizer Best addition so far, Sumo Springs bump stops Rear HEAVY DUTY, Front regular, Wheel alignment Looking to buy Sumo springs heavy duty rear fake air bag to try to stop the heavy bang in rear going over bumps, water empty rv unloaded still bangs going over bumps Sumo bump stops helped 50%,New passenger side mirror,Water filter system, Screen door bar, All new valve stems, Wow ... why did you need to do all of that on a 2011?? By the way, I stopped the banging in the rear of our small (24ft) Class C on it's overkill E450 Ford chassis by having installed in just the rear two of Koni's (expensive) Frequency Selective Damping shocks. We have a much, much better ride due to the FSD shocks' light damping on potholes and road surface cracks. (These shocks switch to stiff heavy damping in other situations.) The ride in the front has always been good with the E450 coil springs. Our chassis has always sat level regardless of how we load it. The front suspension shocks and steering shock are still original OEM after around 86K miles on the chassis. The E450 chassis also came stock with both front and rear anti-sway bars. Since I first started looking for a Class C before we bought ours new in 2006, I wanted a chassis rated for a much higher loading than what the coach of a small Class C would require, and it has paid off. Unfortunately the combination of a chassis rated for considerably more weight than what is actually needed for a Class C coach is becoming very difficult to find nowadays. However, I think that for sure both Coach House and Lazy Daze still offer 22-24 ft. Class C motorhomes based on the Ford E450 cutaway chassis with the new V8 engine. This approach kindof goes along with ... "if you want a tool to be reliable and last a long time, buy a heavy duty one but use it in a light duty way".
pnichols 12/24/20 11:27am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Battery questions for boondocking

FWIW, I consider our 25K BTU motorhome furnace typical. As such, it draws around 6 to 7 amps per hour when it's running. However, it of course doesn't run full time at all. If it runs about 1/3 of the time, it only depletes amp hours out of the coach batteries at a rate of one third of 6 to 7 amps per hour. That would amount to only 2 to 2 1/3 amps per hour of battery amp hours depletion. Most dual battery RV setups in good condition, and kept fairly well charged every 2-3 days, should do quite well keeping the coach warm in anything but extreme low temps if ... the RV isn't a large one and if you block off sections not occupied during nights. Our motorhome is small, and it's furnace keeps us comfortable with 230 AH of battery capacity that powers everything else, including two CPAP machines every night.
pnichols 12/23/20 08:47pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: RVing in the winter

Winter camping: .... .....Spending time outdoors in near cryogenic temperatures especially when solar insolation is minimal (like around the solstice) isn’t fun except as a novelty. So even if one’s RV can theoretically “take it”, are you going to spend all the long nights inside and venture outdoors for 2 hours a day? I realize camping in ~+20F with much longer lower 48 days is much different. But there are very good reasons why lots of Canadians migrate themselves and their (somewhat cold capable) RVs to Mexico or the USA southern states in the winter if they are full timers. Sorry for the lengthy post but the stories are true and the calculations correct. Dr. Aarons, A great writeup on your adventures in the extreme cold (that I referenced in part above)!! And now ... going off topic regarding another ultimate RV'ing challenge ... in which neither more clothes nor nudity are a solution. What would you recommend for drycamping in above 100 degree F outside air temperatures? The reason I ask is this: The DW and myself enjoy rockhounding using our small Class C motorhome as a base ... even if it takes us out into the U.S. version of The Far Side of Beyond. The good thing about doing this in the summer is the complete lack of any other people around. The bad thing about doing this is it's in the summer. Our worst case was way out there in the Texas Panhandle during August. We had to use both the rooftop A/C and built-in RV generator, plus the cab A/C with the engine idling - to keep from melting away after a few minutes outside. The complete serenity while walking around outside in lite clothing under umbrellas and cloudless blue skies was beyond priceless ... just us, the RV, and the Road Runners scampering about. ;) Here's my answer to my own question above on high temperature boondock camping: 1. Inside the coach - use a high power 12V fan powered from the coach batteries for directed air right on you, and/or use the rooftop vent fan powered from the coach batteries set on high for circulation. 2. Inside the coach - use the rooftop A/C and built-in generator, while pressurizing the coach interior to keep all generator fumes from entering. 3. Outside the coach - sit under the awning and use a high power 12V fan on an extension cord powered from the coach batteries for directed air aimed right at you while sitting in a lounge chair. NEVER walk around outside not under the awning in high sun situations without being under a light colored umbrella. For us when we're camping in the heat for a reason, we cannot move to another location to escape the heat. I'm curious as to how others deal with high temperature camping - without moving the RV out of the heat. We simply went home. I have to put ice cubes inside a towels on top of my head and back of the neck to prevent me from passing out or having a heat stroke, lol. I've posted this before, but here it is again for what it's worth: We had a similar near heat stroke experience once with our RV when we couldn't go home. We were in the Texas Panhandle rockhounding in August in most likely triple digit outside air temperatures. When we really got heated up and hungry in the middle of the day, we went back to the RV and fired up both the coach air conditioner/generator and the cab air conditioner/V10 engine. Triple digit outside temps were no match for double A/C's in our small Class C. We got comfortable very quickly and enjoyed a good lunch out in the middle of nowhere. Needless to say we had the whole area to ourselves and our rig took care of us . :)
pnichols 12/23/20 07:44pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: RVing in the winter

Winter camping: .... .....Spending time outdoors in near cryogenic temperatures especially when solar insolation is minimal (like around the solstice) isn’t fun except as a novelty. So even if one’s RV can theoretically “take it”, are you going to spend all the long nights inside and venture outdoors for 2 hours a day? I realize camping in ~+20F with much longer lower 48 days is much different. But there are very good reasons why lots of Canadians migrate themselves and their (somewhat cold capable) RVs to Mexico or the USA southern states in the winter if they are full timers. Sorry for the lengthy post but the stories are true and the calculations correct. Dr. Aarons, A great writeup on your adventures in the extreme cold (that I referenced in part above)!! And now ... going off topic regarding another ultimate RV'ing challenge ... in which neither more clothes nor nudity are a solution. What would you recommend for drycamping in above 100 degree F outside air temperatures? The reason I ask is this: The DW and myself enjoy rockhounding using our small Class C motorhome as a base ... even if it takes us out into the U.S. version of The Far Side of Beyond. The good thing about doing this in the summer is the complete lack of any other people around. The bad thing about doing this is it's in the summer. Our worst case was way out there in the Texas Panhandle during August. We had to use both the rooftop A/C and built-in RV generator, plus the cab A/C with the engine idling - to keep from melting away after a few minutes outside. The complete serenity while walking around outside in lite clothing under umbrellas and cloudless blue skies was beyond priceless ... just us, the RV, and the Road Runners scampering about. ;) Here's my answer to my own question above on high temperature boondock camping: 1. Inside the coach - use a high power 12V fan powered from the coach batteries for directed air right on you, and/or use the rooftop vent fan powered from the coach batteries set on high for circulation. 2. Inside the coach - use the rooftop A/C and built-in generator, while pressurizing the coach interior to keep all generator fumes from entering. 3. Outside the coach - sit under the awning and use a high power 12V fan on an extension cord powered from the coach batteries for directed air aimed right at you while sitting in a lounge chair. NEVER walk around outside not under the awning in high sun situations without being under a light colored umbrella. For us when we're camping in the heat for a reason, we cannot move to another location to escape the heat. I'm curious as to how others deal with high temperature camping - without moving the RV out of the heat.
pnichols 12/22/20 01:56pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: RVing in the winter

Winter camping: .... .....Spending time outdoors in near cryogenic temperatures especially when solar insolation is minimal (like around the solstice) isn’t fun except as a novelty. So even if one’s RV can theoretically “take it”, are you going to spend all the long nights inside and venture outdoors for 2 hours a day? I realize camping in ~+20F with much longer lower 48 days is much different. But there are very good reasons why lots of Canadians migrate themselves and their (somewhat cold capable) RVs to Mexico or the USA southern states in the winter if they are full timers. Sorry for the lengthy post but the stories are true and the calculations correct. Dr. Aarons, A great writeup on your adventures in the extreme cold (that I referenced in part above)!! And now ... going off topic regarding another ultimate RV'ing challenge ... in which neither more clothes nor nudity are a solution. What would you recommend for drycamping in above 100 degree F outside air temperatures? The reason I ask is this: The DW and myself enjoy rockhounding using our small Class C motorhome as a base ... even if it takes us out into the U.S. version of The Far Side of Beyond. The good thing about doing this in the summer is the complete lack of any other people around. The bad thing about doing this is it's in the summer. Our worst case was way out there in the Texas Panhandle during August. We had to use both the rooftop A/C and built-in RV generator, plus the cab A/C with the engine idling - to keep from melting away after a few minutes outside. The complete serenity while walking around outside in lite clothing under umbrellas and cloudless blue skies was beyond priceless ... just us, the RV, and the Road Runners scampering about. ;)
pnichols 12/20/20 05:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Gulfstream BT Cruiser Quality

Over-all it appears to be a nicely constructed rig....with one exception. The walls do not rest on the floor. They are bolted against the side of it. This means the weight of the walls, roof, and everything attached to them, are resting on the fasteners. You can see the practice in the framing picture. I have heard of manufactures building that way, but never understood the logic behind it. Ron ... a very good point about how the walls might be attached! Now I'm scratching my head re my Itasca. Guess I'll have to crawl down underneath and take a look. :h
pnichols 12/19/20 04:19pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: What the ??

Sports cars can also be used to almost die in, or die in ... but with a smile on your face. ;) Years ago my souped up MGA roadster lost a rear wheel when at speed just after coming off a twisty mountain road -> that could have cost my GF (now my DW) and myself our young lives. Some time ago one of only two special built supercharged 427 ~800HP Shelby Cobra roadsters that Shelby's factory made for himself and Bill Cosby cost someone their life. Bill Cosby's Cobra scared him, so Bill sold it ... and the guy he sold it to died in it. Here's a photo of one of those two off-the-chart 800HP 427 roadsters: https://i.imgur.com/9Ed0hezl.png]https://i.imgur.com/9Ed0hezl.png As for pickup trucks, my 1995 Z71 factory built offroad GMC 4X4 PU is just fine. I don't need a bunch of electronic gizmos in it, or access to the Internet via it, or built-in USB 3.1 ports in it, or speed control in it, or traction control in it, or lane assist in it, or proximity control in it, or heated seats in it, or air conditioned seats in it, or a 8-10 inch built-in navigation screen in it, or etc. in it. I bought the truck used in 1997 to do special access volunteer work in the rugged outback of a state park. I now use if for such things as hauling rocks from the rockery for our landscaping project. It does everything well, with no complaining and no steep learning curve for me every time I drive it. Here's it taking me to one of the most remote work areas in that state park: https://i.imgur.com/CDJINtRl.jpg]https://i.imgur.com/CDJINtRl.jpg
pnichols 12/19/20 02:26pm Truck Campers
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