RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Search

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  



Open Roads Forum  >  Search the Forums

 > Your search for posts made by 'pnichols' found 933 matches.

Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 47  
Next
  Subject Author Date Posted Forum
RE: Capping off a propane line: need tips and tricks!

After great effort, I just now found my very slow propane leak (and I will soon prepare a fascinating ;) report on the many things I learned while trying to find it). Bottom line – the leak is at the point that the external barbecue fixture connects to the propane system. What I want to do is remove the barbecue fixture – we never use it. And I want to cap off the stub or nipple that "tees into" the propane line. The pipe is galvanized. It appears to have an ordinary pipe thread -- not a flared brass gas fitting. I am planning to unscrew the existing reducing bushing (I think that is what it is called) and replace it with a galvanized cap. I will use teflon gas tape at that joint. My real question is this: I don't want to put any stress on the other galvanized propane lines underneath the trailer. I will hold back on the galvanized nipple with a pipe wrench while unscrewing the existing reducing bushing. The bushing is very rusty -- I anticipate having to use a lot of force to unscrew it. I'm planning to spray it with WD-40 a day or so before unscrewing it, to try to loosen the threads. Does this sound like the right approach? I am not a plumbing or propane expert, as you can tell. Thanks in advance for your suggestions!! I'm curious regarding the source of your leak ... was that an "Extend-A-Stay" adapter fitting that developed a leak? If so, I was thinking about installing one in motorhome's propane system for use of a 5 gallon propane tank to supplement the main tank on long campouts - plus maybe also power our outdoor BBQ ... but have held off because I didn't want to introduce another potential leak source into my propane system. Here's a link with a photo as to what an Extend-A-Stay adapter is for a built-in propane tank, which may be similar to what you have on your TT for use with an externall BBQ: http://www.rv-project.com/projects/extendstay.php
pnichols 05/23/19 10:50am Tech Issues
RE: Convection Microwave vs. Gas Oven

I have both a gas oven and convection microwave. I rarely use the gas oven in fact I use it mostly for storage. There ya go!! The ultimate setup ... have them BOTH in your RV. IMHO, flexibility is the name of the game in an RV that one wants to have able to deal with any requirement anytime anywhere - on the grid or off the grid.
pnichols 05/22/19 11:50pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: If you had a do-over, which would you get?

The same here on everything mentioned so far in favor of a Class C motorhome based on a Ford V10 powered E-Series cutaway van. In my opinion, the Mercedes chassis and it's engine is too complex (and hence expensive to repair and service) for general RV use here in the U.S. - especially when used in the more rural areas for camping trips. However that might not be the case in Europe, because I think that they're more "diesel vehicle centric" across the pond. We take our small V10 powered Class C off-highway, and it's ground clearance, reliability, and general ruggedness provide a lot of confidence for us. Another detail not mentioned much is that even at the V10's average miles per gallon consumption rate, probably Class C motorhomes based on it with the stock 55 gallon fuel tank have a greater touring range than what the Mercedes 2500 and 3500 cutaway van chassis provide.
pnichols 05/22/19 09:21pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Camping or Glamping?

We consider our 24 foot Class C motorhome as an insulated, weather-proof, heated, cooled, mobile tent that has two permanent queen beds, a refrigerator, a 3-burner stove top, an oven, a table, two sinks, a shower, a toilet, tanks for liquids, and lot of storage volume. As such, we consider each trip in our mobile tent as a potential mini-expedition in our poor-man's expedition vehicle. We prefer taking it out to nature-based areas as opposed to areas involving around human habitation ... however we do visit both types of places. Do we camp or glamp? I don't know.
pnichols 05/22/19 01:04pm General RVing Issues
RE: Best Class C sprinter if you had lots of money

I have a 2018 Winnebago Navion 24V, purchased brand new, and we like it, at the price we paid for it. Winnebago has been making the class C on the Sprinter chassis for over a decade and they've pretty much got the bugs worked out in what works and what doesn't. True, that everyone is starting to offer the Sprinter based chassis, but not all have been doing it long enough to make it work like Winnie. One thing to do before you look at price, and fit and finish, and other options, make sure the unit you decide on can haul all the stuff you plan on taking with you, including you and your family members. The Achilles heel of the Sprinter based class/type C motorhomes is their OCCC. Coming from a 5th wheel, you will notice the difference. I think the ones with the full wall slides, and any that come with electric/hydraulic levelling systems are the most "OCCC challenged" makes/models. If the OP hadn't specified the Sprinter chassis, of course the Coach House models built on the Ford E450 chassis solve the OCCC problem. What you get is a superbly built leak-proof-for-life motorhome that you can load up, weight-wise, with no concerns. I guess the downside for the OP would be a Class B instead of a Class C ... and one has to be able to figure out how to pay for it. What you really get with an E350/E450 chassis unit is a gas guzzling, high revs for HP and torque, very loud V10 engine, 3 feet away from you, under a usually poorly insulated doghouse, that may be more af(Ford)able than the Mercedes chassis models. I know whereof I speak, because I drank the Ford V10 koolaid 3 years ago, and bought one. Then I actually took it on the road. Traded it in when we got back from the maiden voyage. Bought the Navion and haven't looked back. "leak-proof-for-life"? Uh huh, sure. So, here we are again, the Ford lovers invade a Mercedes thread, and we're descending into the bottomless pit of the Ford versus Mercedes death match. It never ends, I guess. :R Huuuuuhhhh?? From my viewpoint, Mercedes needs to offer a 4500 Sprinter dually chassis to solve the problem of Class C weight limitations. Even if one doesn't need more weight carrying capacity, they might desire the additional margin a 4500 Sprinter chassis would provide in such areas as braking power and longevity, frame strength, drive system components' ruggedness, less rocking when walking inside the coach at campsites, etc., etc.. For what it's worth to some, an E450 under a small to moderate size Class C provides the above. Maybe Ford has cheapened their E-Series chassis? Anyway, our several years old 24 foot E450 based MH is not "loud in the cab" when loafing along the highway 2200 RPM, gets ~10 MPG on cheap regular gas, doesn't have a hot cab area in the summer, feeds the built-in coach generator from the same tank it's V10 is using, pulls our boat everywhere as if it wasn't there, can heat or cool the entire coach from it's cab systems on the road or when parked, and best of all ... can be repaired and/or maintained all over the U.S. for a reasonable amount of money without the repair mechanic having to wait on parts delivery. I guess part of the issue may hinge on how stress-free and simple does one want their RV life to be.
pnichols 05/21/19 07:24pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: li batteries--a good primer

Hi all, This is a good explanation of what to expect from LIfePo4. https://www.solacity.com/how-to-keep-lifepo4-lithium-ion-batteries-happy/ Here is their summation: To sum up, for long and happy LFP battery life, in order of importance, you should be mindful of the following: Keep the battery temperature under 45 Centigrade (under 30C if possible) – This is by far the most important!! Keep charge and discharge currents under 0.5C (0.2C preferred) Keep battery temperature above 0 Centigrade when discharging if possible – This, and everything below, is nowhere near as important as the first two Do not cycle below 10% – 15% SOC unless you really need to Do not float the battery at 100% SOC if possible Do not charge to 100% SOC if you do not need it That's a lot of restrictions for a battery that costs at least 10x what a lead acid costs. Operating temp 30C?! horse hockey! Charge current 0.2 to 0.5C, that's terrible. I agree completely, Gordon! Too narrow a usage temperature range and too many $$$ -> just to reduce RV battery weight per useable amp hour of capacity. Also, when not on the road we like to keep our RV in the back yard with continuous power applied ... including not having to remember to ... either turn OFF the solenoid to the AGM house batteries or turn OFF the built-in converter, so as to not float the batteries too much.
pnichols 05/21/19 12:48pm Tech Issues
RE: How big is too big?

FWIW, we have a few times had to pass up certain campsites even when in our 24 foot Class C motorhome. This is rare but can happen ... and for some reason it usually happens at compsites that are otherwise in fantastic settings. Stay in as small an RV as you can possibly tolerate is my advice.
pnichols 05/21/19 12:38pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Best Class C sprinter if you had lots of money

I have a 2018 Winnebago Navion 24V, purchased brand new, and we like it, at the price we paid for it. Winnebago has been making the class C on the Sprinter chassis for over a decade and they've pretty much got the bugs worked out in what works and what doesn't. True, that everyone is starting to offer the Sprinter based chassis, but not all have been doing it long enough to make it work like Winnie. One thing to do before you look at price, and fit and finish, and other options, make sure the unit you decide on can haul all the stuff you plan on taking with you, including you and your family members. The Achilles heel of the Sprinter based class/type C motorhomes is their OCCC. Coming from a 5th wheel, you will notice the difference. I think the ones with the full wall slides, and any that come with electric/hydraulic levelling systems are the most "OCCC challenged" makes/models. If the OP hadn't specified the Sprinter chassis, of course the Coach House models built on the Ford E450 chassis solve the OCCC problem. What you get is a superbly built leak-proof-for-life motorhome that you can load up, weight-wise, with no concerns. I guess the downside for the OP would be a Class B instead of a Class C ... and one has to be able to figure out how to pay for it.
pnichols 05/21/19 12:30pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

The large EFOY fuel cell - 8.8 amps per hour times 24 hours a day - will restore over 200 amp hours per day into an RV's battery bank. That's equivalent to bringing back up to full charge about a 430 AH lead acid battery bank that you deplete down to 50% SOC every day. It would take a healthy size RV solar panel installation (even if you could fit it on the roof) and good sun at a good angle each day to do that. If I didn't care about air conditioning, I'd save the Onan or EU3000i Honda generator cost - when buying a new motorhome or TT - and go for an EFOY, instead, for self-contained power guaranteed all the time. I can think of worse ways for dyed in the wool drycampers to spend $4K RV dollars.
pnichols 05/21/19 11:00am Tech Issues
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

phil, those Efoys look mighty fine -- 27 decibels is quieter than a library! Only one little problem -- it's four thousand dollars for the 25 watt unit. Ouch! I am sure that the magnetic perpetual motion machine will produce much more power for free, in perfect silence. ;) Dan .... where did you get 25 watts from? This spec sheet shows three models that deliver - either 3.3 amps @ 12 volts, or 6.0 amps @ 12 volts, or 8.8 amps @ 12 volts: https://www.efoy-comfort.com/technical-data Keep in mind that these fuel cells automatically put out these currents if the battery(ies) will accept them anytime and all the time as the batteries are being used -> depending upon how fast the loads are trying to drain the battery(ies). Multiply these three currents times 24 hours and you can see how many amp hours can be put back into the RV's battery bank per day. Doing this you can see that a lot of amp hours per day can be delivered to the battery(ies) as needed ... even continuously hour after hour. Considering what RVs cost and what the cost is for the built-in generator option in those RVs ... I'm inclined to feel that an EFOY fuel cell might be a great investment for those RVs if air conditioning is not desired. What one is getting with an EFOY is a power source that can be transferred from RV to RV and can be used anytime, anywhere, any season for keeping the battery(ies) topped up ... no solar cells needed.
pnichols 05/20/19 08:43pm Tech Issues
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

MrWizard, just to be clear, these folks did not even focus on the RV market -- they are looking at power generation in general. But assuming it works and is not a hoax (a big "if"), naturally my next thought is "silent power for my RV!" It's nice to dream, as long as nobody's wallet gets hurt. ;) Dan, here's the answer for right now (until propane fuel cells are available for RVs). These methanol fuel cells are the next best thing ... quiet, automatically keep your batteries topped up 24/7 with no sun required, make no noise, and run up to 30 days on a 9"x8"x13" plastic container of fuel (a 15 day sized container is also available). I think that they started out being used in the marine world, but now IMHO should be recognized as a Holy Grail for RV battery maintenance use. You might want to click around the site to read all they have to say. Here's a couple of links to start with: https://www.efoy-comfort.com/installation-your-mobile-home https://www.efoy-comfort.com/technical-data Here's another link with helpful general info on use of fuel cells for power: https://www.fs.fed.us/t-d/pubs/htmlpubs/htm09732309/
pnichols 05/20/19 11:36am Tech Issues
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

Well ... maybe the Inductance Energy company is indeed on to something. If magnetic energy can be used to fly everywhere, then probably it can be used to generate power: https://airfreshener.club/quotes/rotating-ufo-magnetic-propulsion.html Until I can afford a (quiet?) magnetic energy driven RV generator, I sure wish Camping World would add a compact 4000 watt propane powered RV fuel cell to it's product portfolio. ;)
pnichols 05/19/19 08:15pm Tech Issues
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

When they say recharging, supposedly they have to re-polarize the magnets every few years. But they claim that they get a lot more energy out of these things than they put in. Even though I am deeply skeptical, there are two factors that make me think that this might not be a hoax. First, the hoax was good enough to snag a two page spread in the Wall Street Journal, not known as a tabloid. Second, these folks certainly knew, going in, that anyone who knows anything about physics would be scrutinizing this device fiercely. Yet they persisted, investing a lot of money into this new company. The folks running the company have pretty good credentials and do not seem to be pie in the sky dreamers. So the fact that they have pushed ahead with development makes me wonder whether this might be legitimate. Until it shows up on the back wall next to the Hondas at Camping World, though, I am not going to invest a penny! Dan ... nevertheless I assume they've covered their concept(s) and initial implementation model(s) with multiple patents, so it seems to me that simple disclosure via a clear video to generate investor and general interest would be in order. IMHO, the video on their site missed the mark! How does their machinery keep going in order to convert something (the force of magnetism?) into electricity?
pnichols 05/19/19 04:27pm Tech Issues
RE: Magnetic propulsion: can they make an RV generator?

I read about this in the Wall Street Journal. Supposedly, this company has developed a way to differentially polarize magnets, causing a flywheel to spin, thus generating power. Many scientists are skeptical. But it is fun to dream, isn't it? Imagine a silent smaller version of this for RV travel -- give it a spin and watch the juice flow: Seems too good to be true . . . . Dan ... my only reaction is ????????????????????????????????????? I guess I'd have to read the patents to even begin to understand what the base source of energy is, since their website Q&A states that it is not a perpetual motion machine. The video on their website is just a whole lot of "engineering sounding" words describing their highly mechanical and complex spinning contraption - with no real down to earth explanation of what is going on. I can understand logical and linear explanations of complex stuff ... gobbilty-goop explanations I cannot. :h
pnichols 05/19/19 10:32am Tech Issues
RE: Will this charge an AGM battery?

Is setting up a Megawatt with a tiny generator too much to bear? I guess no one can explain the difference between charging our AGMs slowly to low acceptance current levels versus charging them quickly to low acceptance current levels. However I'm really not all that worried for my AGMs, anyway. We don't drycamp long enough in any one place to ruin the batteries by using the converter's only 13.X volts at campsites to partially top them up with the converter fed from one of our two generators. This is supplemented via periodically charging the RV's AGM batteries the supposedly correct way using higher voltages and currents from the 130 amp alternator by either idling of the big engine a bit, or while driving to another campsite. I can see those higher charging voltages and acceptance currents happening via the gauges I've mounted on the cab's dash specifically for that. This system has so far worked out well given our hit and run camping style. FWIW, for our next drycamping trip I'm going to try powering a different stand alone charger with our 650 watt Honda to top up the AGMs at the campsite. I have a high end ProMariner waterproof marine 3-bank multi-stage charger in which I've combined it's three charging outputs into one pair of alligator clips. I'll see if this delivers high terminal voltages to the RV's AGM batteries while I monitor the current going into the batteries. If we were RV squatters the little generator powering an adjustable built-in converter or stand alone adjustable charger - like Mex is advocating for - would certainly be the way to go.
pnichols 05/19/19 12:33am Tech Issues
RE: Will this charge an AGM battery?

The mat is microporous low energy charging when a battery is depleted does not impact plates that are surface dried. High energy drives which means circulates fresh acid throughout the mat and reverts the plate surface. Another benefit of the lifeline -- more acid per square surface area. Slow and incomplete is like a starving person with a 3" plate of food being yanked away from the table after a few minutes of eating. Like putting a malnourished person on a diet. This is the basis of my saturated charging. Course a person could stick with a doubtful attitude and make the battery distributor pee his pants in gratitude Lyrical No/Yes? David: My question is concerned only with use of AGM charging voltages less than 4 volts ... but doing the charging over many hours until the current acceptance level is reduced to around 0.5 amps for my 230 AH AGM bank. I "think" I'm fully charging my RV's deep cycle AGMs to complete full every time using only ~13.6 to ~13.8 volts. What worries me is ... am I indeed slowing ruining my AGMs? I think you're saying "yes" to my question ... because of not applying enough voltage field strength initially so as to properly move acid ions in the matt to where they need to go for a fully charged condition. Boy .... I hope this isn't the case, cuz if it is I'm slowly destroying my $$$ AGMs. :E
pnichols 05/18/19 08:38pm Tech Issues
RE: Will this charge an AGM battery?

Well ... so far NO ONE has explained why a "low and slow" charging style used all the way to full charge eventually reduces the design capacity of an AGM deep cycle battery, while a "high at first" followed by low and slow for the remainder of the way to full charge is what's necessary so as to not reduce the design capaicty of an AGM deep cycle battery. Math equations and chemical formulas should not be necessary. Why does low and slow maintained all the way to full charge each time - eventually ruin an AGM deep cycle battery? I understand that liquid acid deep cycle batteries are a different animal in that they do benefit from boost voltages to stir things up a bit during each charge to fulness.
pnichols 05/18/19 02:19pm Tech Issues
RE: Will this charge an AGM battery?

Pretty tough to beat a Megawatt set at specified OEM absorbsion limit for AGM for small generators or BFL13's favorite that 100-amp charger. Now leaving BFL's charger at say 13.5 volts, and re-charging 50% SOC batteries say 200 AH worth, what is the initial charge acceptance? BFL? Not tried that, but estimating close to 100 for a very short time and then rapid amps tapering. At 50% start, normally you would have the charger at 14.x for the Bulk Stage. In that case, it would likely kick off at close to 100, tapering very soon after that, but not so rapid a taper at 14.x. With 200AH a good initial charging rate from 50% would be about 70 amps to get a short Bulk Stage, however that is dubious with a 2000w (1600VA) gen, so a 60 amp charger would be the way to go. That is for most AGMs and for Wets (Lifeline AGMs can take more of an initial charge rate than most AGMs, but you need the bigger gen to run the higher amps) BTW the 100a charger in the photo has been sold, and I am using a similar model 75 amper these days. Can't take the 3000w Honda (also sold) in the MH, so now have a B&S P2200 (1700VA) gen, which can just manage the 75 amper. EDIT--link above says AGMs can be at "any orientation"--wrong. Not supposed to mount them upside down. BF ... this is a clip from your post above: "(Lifeline AGMs can take more of an initial charge rate than most AGMs, but you need the bigger gen to run the higher amps)". I see this mentioned all the time regarding Lifeline AGM batteries - and I don't understand why Lifeline AGM batteries might have any advantage over several other AGM RV battery brands with respect to accepting way higher initial charging currrent with any given initial boost charging voltage applied. As an exampe, the Lifeline GPL-31XT 12V deep cycle AGM battery has an internal resistance of 3.03 milliohms, while the Fullriver DC115-12 12V deep cycle AGM Battery has an internal resistance of 3.8 milliohms. This small difference isn't going to allow Lileline to accept "a lot more current during boost charging" than the Fullriver ... unless I'm missing something outside of basic electrical principles. I suspect that Lifeline may be merely making marketing hay at the expense of potentially naive customers.
pnichols 05/18/19 01:37pm Tech Issues
RE: Koni FSD where to get besides Shockwarehouse

So now I feel bad I complained about Shockwarehouse. I was frustrated and only have so much time to research products I want to purchase. Those shocks are very expensive for a guy like me and I just wanted to make sure I would not have any problems..... Ended up getting them from another vendor. Between the rear airbags (firestone ride rite) and the new shocks, I should have a good driving rig. I will report back after I get them installed. Thanks to all who replied with suggestions.... Jack, I'm curious ... did you order the FSD shocks for both the front and rear?
pnichols 05/16/19 02:29pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: New You Tube Harbor Freight Inverter Generator noise Test

Just for what it's worth, I'll bet that little tear-drop trailer also has a way smaller A/C unit in it than that in the typical much larger RV. If so, of course a 3500 watt variable speed ("inverter") generator is going to be loafing along when powering it - as opposed to a small inverter generator that must work hard in it's upper RPM range to power the same small A/C unit. Guess what generator is going to be quieter? Hence the test was invalid in that it was comparing apples to oranges. The trick is to - design and affordably price a generator that is still pretty quiet in the upper end of it's RPM range such that it can be sized so as to not have to be any larger (or heavier) than necessary to power the heaviest load expected. i.e. The Honda EU2200i - that is only 57 dB(A) at full load and a world-class 48 dB(A) at 1/4 load (click on the "Specs" tab) - can easily be lifted, while also being ultra quiet when powering typical RV air conditioners including the probably small A/C in the test : https://powerequipment.honda.com/generators/models/eu2200i
pnichols 05/15/19 09:23pm Tech Issues
Sort by:    Search within results:
Page of 47  
Next


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS