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 > Your search for posts made by 'profdant139' found 279 matches.

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RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Well, I just got back from two weeks of boondocking in Utah (Cap Reef/Bryce/Zion). Lots of sand -- never got stuck. We rejected several sites that seemed too sandy. The best method that I found for evaluating the sand is to dig your heels into a tire track. If you soon hit solid packed sand, that's great. If you dig and dig and it is still soft, not great. I will be prepping a detailed trip report and will post a link in a few weeks, after we finish rinsing the red dust off our possessions. My socks will never be the same.
profdant139 04/18/21 06:44pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: No Dispersed Camping Near Crested Butte, Colorado

As the article makes clear, this is not the end of boondocking – it just limits the number of boondockers by requiring us to park at specific sites, rather than just anywhere we want. This new rule is a great and necessary development -- the area was being overrun by folks who camped just about anywhere and everywhere around Crested Butte. For example, we were in Washington Gulch a few years ago and snagged what we thought was a great site -- it had a little signpost at the entryway, with a steeply sloping driveway leading up to a level pad. That night, long after we got the trailer parked, a whole bunch of folks (eventually about 50 of them!!) parked their trucks along the sloping driveway, pitched tents, and built campfires, all within 50 yards of our trailer. Fortunately, they were not too noisy, and they left the next day and picked up all of their trash. But still, this is not typical boondocking behavior! And we saw the same thing happening all over the whole area, such as the Gothic Valley and Kebler Pass. So don't despair – this will make it a lot nicer for those lucky folks who do manage to grab a posted site!! And in case anyone wants to see photos of that area, here is our blog post: Crested Butte And once you see the photos, you will understand why this area is so crowded -- it is very beautiful, and everyone wants to go there.
profdant139 04/02/21 04:36pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

I hope you are right! I will find out for sure during the coming weeks and will report back in late April.
profdant139 04/02/21 04:09pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Al, thanks for the tip about Crawl Control! I will look into it. I do have all of the "get unstuck" equipment with me but have never had to use it -- not yet, anyways. The problem here is that I am not going to spend much time in the sand -- just fifty feet of it. But that's more than enough to ruin my day, if it is too soft and if I handle the truck improperly. You know what they say about the acronym "4WD" -- it really means "you now have the ability to get stuck a quarter mile further from help than you otherwise would have been." ;)
profdant139 04/02/21 03:53pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Banff, Lake Louise and Jasper, Alberta

I'm a little late to the dance, but here is a link to three blog posts that might be of interest: Peter Lougheed Banff and Jasper Lake Louise and Yoho In general, I would say that the Canadian Rockies are the most spectacular area I have ever seen in my life, and I have done a lot of traveling. I would recommend spending as much time in that area as you can, if you hike. If you don't hike, a week or ten days might be enough.
profdant139 04/02/21 10:02am RVing in Canada and Alaska
RE: Spring Time Trip to the Desert

Beautiful photos! The quality of the light in the desert is so great.
profdant139 04/02/21 09:47am Travel Trailers
RE: Leave TT Unhitched?

We have boondocked and dry-camped for the last 16 years -- probably a total of a thousand nights so far. We've never had anything disturbed or stolen. We do use a hitch lock when we are in a campground near a big city. Speak, which area of Utah are you focusing on? Let us know, and we can give you some general hints about where to look for potential boondocking sites!
profdant139 03/28/21 10:13am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

wopachop, I've never felt my axle hop. That does not sound like a fun feeling. I wonder if putting the truck into 4WLO might reduce the hop??
profdant139 03/28/21 10:00am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Lots of great tips -- thanks! Someone asked why I pre-screen possible boondocking sites on Google Earth. The real answer is "because I can!" In the old days, even ten years ago, the quality of the imagery was not sufficient to permit me this luxury. But now, from the comfort of my own home, I can fly around, looking for good sites and "bookmarking" the waypoints on my phone, using the iHikeGPS app. (It works without cell service!) Especially now, with so many RV newbies competing for campsites, it makes sense to me to plan ahead as much as I can, rather than just driving around hoping to get lucky and find a good site. Also, if we are planning to arrive in the late afternoon, I'd prefer not to run out of daylight while prowling the back roads in search of a campsite. Plus, hunting for campsites at home online is way more fun than doing household chores! ;)
profdant139 03/26/21 04:12pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
A useful tip for using the BLM interactive maps

I use the BLM maps when looking for boondocking spots. They are very detailed, but they can be hard to read. Often, the colors are so opaque that I can't read the underlying text. After much trial and error, I think I have a way to fix that (although not permanently): After you load the map, click on the layers symbol in the upper right -- it looks like a stack of square pancakes. Scroll down to Surface Management Agency. Click that box. Click the three dots on the right. Scroll down to "transparency." Slide the slider to the right, about 2/3 of the way across. It is important to have some color, so that you can tell where the BLM land starts and stops. (You can't boondock in a national park or on private land, of course.) Also, when zooming in and out, it is better to use the plus and minus symbols on the left, rather than using your mouse or trackpad to zoom. Otherwise, it is too easy to zoom too far and too fast. Here is a link to the Utah BLM map, in case you want to practice adjusting the transparency. I hope this tip will save you some of the frustration I have been experiencing! ;) BLM Utah map, as an example
profdant139 03/25/21 07:11pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Here is a better version of the image -- this time, instead of using Google Earth's "save image" utility, I used the new screenshot app on my Mac -- the pin labels are clearer. If you are running Mojave, the shortcut is shift-command-5. Anyway, here is the picture: https://i.imgur.com/zHMel50l.jpg "border=0" https://i.imgur.com/m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image.
profdant139 03/25/21 06:57pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Google Earth images: tips that might be useful

Yes -- the pin labels are more legible. If you have a Mac and are running Mojave, the shortcut to the new screenshot app is shift-command-5.
profdant139 03/25/21 06:54pm Technology Corner
RE: Google Earth images: tips that might be useful

Here is another approach -- let's see if it is any better. This time, I took a screenshot of the Google Earth image: https://i.imgur.com/zHMel50l.jpg "border=0" https://i.imgur.com/m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image.
profdant139 03/25/21 06:51pm Technology Corner
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

I will for sure scout on foot before plunging ahead. And FWC, that was a great point about looking at the tire tracks. The problem, of course, is that when I am crossing a stream bed, recent storms will have erased the tracks. Here is a sample of what I am talking about -- although this stream crossing is more, well, extreme than what I would probably attempt -- this stream looks to be about 80 feet wide. In this photo, the main BLM road is on the left. The access road drops down at the center. You can then see where the access road continues, on the other side of the stream: https://i.imgur.com/LsEFOPQl.jpg "border=0" https://i.imgur.com/m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image. As I said, this particular crossing is too tough for me, but I am thinking about sites that involve easier sandy stream beds.
profdant139 03/25/21 05:20pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
Google Earth images: tips that might be useful

This topic has been moved to another forum. You can read it here: 30220819
profdant139 03/25/21 05:15pm Forum Posting Help and Support
Google Earth images: tips that might be useful

I hit "save image" on Google Earth, and the image was saved in a folder on my computer. I then used 1492's great photo posting app, and am now posting the result: https://i.imgur.com/LsEFOPQl.jpg "border=0" https://i.imgur.com/m3zZPvb.pngClick For Full-Size Image.
profdant139 03/25/21 05:15pm Technology Corner
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

45 mph! There is no way that I can go more than 10 mph on those rough forest roads. But based on your advice (and I know you have been there and done that!), I will do my best to keep my speed up, rather than crawling into the sandy wash at 2 mph.
profdant139 03/25/21 02:14pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Great tips -- keep 'em coming! Yosemite, I bring carpet scraps -- never had to use them yet, but this could be the time that I will. time2roll, that is a great point about 4wLO. I will have to look in the owner's manual to find out how fast I can go in 4wLO -- I think there is a speed limit. ndrorder, I do have a compressor, but it is not the big beefy type that real off-roaders carry. Mine is fairly small. It works fine, but slowly. That is why I am going to avoid airing down, if at all possible.
profdant139 03/25/21 01:19pm Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
RE: Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

Well, sometimes it could take all day, but in this case, maybe not. Each potential boondocking site that I have picked out on Google Earth involves just one "dry stream" crossing of about 50 feet (the width of a forest road). If there were more sand crossings than that, I removed the site from my list of possible sites! So this is about a very limited problem. I certainly will get out and stomp on the sand before driving over it, except that I have no frame of reference -- how soft is too soft? I am guessing that I could get stuck in a little sand patch, just like a bigger one -- ten feet away from solid ground is nine feet too far! ;) So that is my question -- is there a way to evaluate sand by stomping on it, kicking it, or whatever??
profdant139 03/25/21 11:31am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
Boondocking in the sand -- how soft is too soft??

We are gearing up for a trip to Utah, and several of the boondocking sites we are considering are on BLM land near the national parks. Looking at Google Earth, I can see that the little access roads sometimes cross over sandy creek beds. Once I've got "boots on the ground," is there a way to determine when the sand is just too deep and soft to cross? I've got big tires on my truck and also on my trailer, but I don't plan to air down -- none of these sandy patches would be more than 50 feet wide or so. Airing down would be a big hassle, mostly because of the time and effort it would take to re-inflate the tires. I understand that serious sand towing is one of those skills that requires experience, and often painful experience. But, as part of that skill set, is there a way to tell when the sand is not suitable for towing? Some kind of a rule of thumb? For example, you stomp your foot and it goes in six inches. Not good. Or it goes in a quarter inch. That's good. Any and all wisdom will be gratefully accepted! Thanks in advance.
profdant139 03/25/21 09:56am Public Lands, Boondocking and Dry Camping
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