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 > Your search for posts made by 'ron.dittmer' found 296 matches.

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RE: TV recommendations for outdoor TV entertainment center

take the tv off the mount and bring it inside and hook it directly to the sat box to see if it works then you will know if its the tv or the connection. That was my thought. Hook up the supposedly bad TV to a known good working connection at home to verify it's a bad TV. I never heard of a TV go bad because the compartment it is stored in is too hot. But maybe I will learn something here. As far as recommending a replacement TV, when it comes time to replace our TV, I hope to find one that operates off 12V. I have seen some smaller TVs that utilize a transformer, like a laptop computer uses. If the operating voltage is not much more than 14V, I would try to power it directly to the house 12V power source instead of what I am doing now, converting 110V to 12V.....a poor use of precious boondocking battery power. Ideally I would like a thin frameless 32" house battery powered edge-lit LED TV that is a power miser. My current 26" TV is a power hog. I know it is a power hog because of the heat it generates. https://live.staticflickr.com/6173/6191936126_12d4e1ae89_z.jpg width=640
ron.dittmer 07/14/19 06:41pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: No Spare tire correct

Many motor homes as of late do not include a spare tire, especially the Sprinter. Some RV manufactures offer one as an option, others don't even offer a place to mount one. The reason concerns the extra weight of the tire, most prominent on rigs that are already close to GVWR. Mounting a spare tire on or near the rear bumper amplifies the weight problem, over-loading the rear axle and the 4 rear tires. To people without a spare tire, I advise to carry a tire repair kit with compressor, the kind where you use the sticky rope to plug the hole. Clean punctures like from a nail can be repaired with the tire on the vehicle. Walmart sells compact tire repair kits. The tire-on-vehicle repair is not advised to be a permanent repair, but for a clean puncture, it should be enough to get you rolling to the next tire shop for a proper repair. Others will chime in to say that the spare is deleted to increase profits which is also true, but the primary reason involves "weight" placed in a bad place. If you tow another vehicle, then carrying a spare is less of a crises when it happens by taking the flat tire in the other vehicle to get it repaired. Another thing a few people do is carry the RV spare in the tow vehicle. Both our motor home and tow vehicle have a spare tire. I like the peace of mind to have them and also the appropriate jacks and tire irons.
ron.dittmer 07/14/19 06:26am Class C Motorhomes
RE: "Best" RV GPS Nav Systems

Our smart phones offer up-to-date navigation where cell coverage exists. We bring an old outdated GPS navigation devise to fill in the voids as needed, but our primary backup is a paper Rand McNally Atlas. I am not sure we would bring a GPS navigation devise if we had not already owned an old one. GPS navigators require expensive updates or subscriptions, a big turn-off for me because the updates can over-load and then drag down the performance of an older devise. I kind of like that our radio does not have an integrated GPS because outdated electronic gadgets irritate me. I like that the disease is not built into our rig.
ron.dittmer 07/13/19 06:34am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C steering stabilizer

I have been on RV forums for around 12 years now. It seems that owners of shorter rigs with long rear over-hangs, and owners of longer rigs with shorter wheels bases, have handling issues and often consider suspension upgrades to improve handling. Based on that, it is easy to conclude that a long wheel base with a short over-all length is going to naturally handle better. Then add to that, a B+ cap instead of an over-head sleeper, angled transition walls, a lower over-all profile, everything in combination are additional positive influences for a better handling rig. It does explain why some of us say their rigs need help, and others who think the complaints are unfounded. Our rig has a 158" wheel base and an over-all length of 23-8". I feel we have a lot of rear over-hang when considering the wheel base. Our 2007 E350 chassis from Ford did not include any kind of rear stabilizer bar. Ford started included one in 2008. We invested further in heavy duty front & rear stabilizer bars, heavy duty shocks, a Safe-T-Plus steering stabilizer, a rear trac bar, and a front wheel alignment. All in combination, the improvement was dramatic. For my wife and me, adding another $3900 to a $70,000 purchase was one more upgrade, just as we invested in other upgrades. The suspension upgrade improved our over-all safety and driving & riding comfort, which also stabilizes our rig when parked eliminating for the need for stabilization jacks. My wife is very comfortable driving our rig with tow vehicle, a huge benefit all by itself. Since 2007 when we had all the work done, I learned that I could have saved a lot of money by buying and installing nearly everything myself, saving 1/2 to 2/3 of our $3900 investment.
ron.dittmer 07/12/19 08:59pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C steering stabilizer

I operated medium duty ambulances all my working life on highways at 80 mph and never had to add any of this aftermarket stuff. A correct alignment was always most helpful.Keep in-mind that there is a huge difference between an E450 chassis ambulance and an E450 motor home. Nearly every Ford E350/E450 and Chevy 3500/4500 based motor home has a significant frame extension hanging off the back of the OEM chassis. Ambulances are built and limited to the length of the original Ford or Chevy chassis. The frame extension on a motor home messes with handling and weight distribution, often accompanied by a massive over-head bed that protrudes forward of the windshield acting like a sail in reverse direction. You really cannot compare any ambulance to a class C motor home even though they are built on the same basic chassis.
ron.dittmer 07/12/19 08:33pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Class C steering stabilizer

Hi Marty, Class-Cs that benefit most from a heavy duty steering stabilizer, are shorter rigs. Your rig being 31 feet long, will still benefit, but the problem is less prominent to begin with, especially if your wheel base is longer than average (for your length) and your rear overhang is less than average. With that said, our short under-24 class B+ has a Safe-T-Plus and it is effective. I cannot speak of other lower priced options. Two negatives for our Safe-T-Plus are... 1) high purchase price 2) no life-time warranty (just a one year warranty)
ron.dittmer 07/12/19 05:39am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Location & Changing fuel filter Ford E 450 V10

I saw a Youtube video, a fellow made a special tool from the cap of a Sharpie pen. It seemed to have worked extremely well for him. He complained Ford's special tool didn't work, requiring him to get creative.
ron.dittmer 07/10/19 09:50am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Decisions

Hi Lucy, Assuming your rig will be accommodating two adults and maybe a guest now and then, a B+ (no over-head sleeper) would be a wise choice. You give up a lot of storage, but you gain more in other ways. As mag..... mentioned higher up, a used Phoenix Cruiser is a nice consideration, especially the ones made starting in 2004 as identified by having the integrated spare tire in back. If you like single beds, model 2551 and 2552 are nice choices but 2552 is near 28' long. If you must sleep together, consider models 2700 with walk-around double bed, or model 2350 or 2351 with rear corner double bed. Those look like nice MH's. I was looking at the 2351D with two slides and a queen bed. The only down side is it only has 27 gal of FW. Not good if you dry camp.Yikes....27 gallons of fresh water is way too little. Where did you get that number from? I can't find the specs on it. Model 2351 with one slide out carries 45 gallons of fresh water, the tank is under the bed. Maybe the 2351D with the slide-out there shrinks the fresh water tank. 27 gallons (5 of them in the water heater) would not work at all for us. Our 2007 model 2350 carries 41 gallons total and it works well. We do exclusively boondock. Hi Ron, it is on their web site. The 2351D is a nice layout, lots of room with the two slides and the queen bed. Most of the 24 ft Class C's with the full wall slides seem to have more FW at least 40 gals. The 2100 and 2400 also only had 26 gals of FW. Even their 2910D and 2910T which are 31 ft only have 36 gals which surprised me.That is strange. Unlike the other models I click on, when I click on the 2351D floorplan, I don't get specs. I get a financing & credit feature. Oh well.
ron.dittmer 07/09/19 04:14pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Decisions

Hi Lucy, Assuming your rig will be accommodating two adults and maybe a guest now and then, a B+ (no over-head sleeper) would be a wise choice. You give up a lot of storage, but you gain more in other ways. As mag..... mentioned higher up, a used Phoenix Cruiser is a nice consideration, especially the ones made starting in 2004 as identified by having the integrated spare tire in back. If you like single beds, model 2551 and 2552 are nice choices but 2552 is near 28' long. If you must sleep together, consider models 2700 with walk-around double bed, or model 2350 or 2351 with rear corner double bed. Those look like nice MH's. I was looking at the 2351D with two slides and a queen bed. The only down side is it only has 27 gal of FW. Not good if you dry camp.Yikes....27 gallons of fresh water is way too little. Where did you get that number from? I can't find the specs on it. Model 2351 with one slide out carries 45 gallons of fresh water, the tank is under the bed. Maybe the 2351D with the slide-out there shrinks the fresh water tank. 27 gallons (5 of them in the water heater) would not work at all for us. Our 2007 model 2350 carries 41 gallons total and it works well. We do exclusively boondock.
ron.dittmer 07/09/19 11:03am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Decisions

Hi Lucy, Assuming your rig will be accommodating two adults and maybe a guest now and then, a B+ (no over-head sleeper) would be a wise choice. You give up a lot of storage, but you gain more in other ways. As mag..... mentioned higher up, a used Phoenix Cruiser is a nice consideration, especially the ones made starting in 2004 as identified by having the integrated spare tire in back. If you like single beds, model 2551 and 2552 are nice choices but 2552 is near 28' long. If you must sleep together, consider models 2700 with walk-around double bed, or model 2350 or 2351 with rear corner double bed.
ron.dittmer 07/09/19 12:22am Class C Motorhomes
RE: You Tube Great Source of RV "How To" Info

Good for you Bordercollie. I did not realize you were anchored for so long a period. It is great to read that you have gone through your rig well. Welcome back to the joys of RVing. I agree with you, there are a lot of great videos out there on how to awaken and prepare a motor home for use.
ron.dittmer 07/04/19 05:56am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Recommended Tow Set-Ups (Brands) for the Toad

We will rarely use a conventional RV park/campground....mostly National Parks/BLM/State Parks/boondocking, ect.That is us too. We do our best to avoid private camping. We tow a 2006 Jeep Liberty, also for the same reasons you mentioned. We used to tow a tiny car but quickly learned that we needed a 4x4 to address the adventurer in us.
ron.dittmer 07/03/19 08:46am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Recommended Tow Set-Ups (Brands) for the Toad

Under 2500 pounds is a light weight tow vehicle. It will not be stressing any available tow bar. Seemingly, it then boils down to what tow bar is most friendly to use for the particular vehicle you are towing. You do need to make sure your tow vehicle can be towed and the tow bar you select also has an available tow bar bracket specifically designed for your vehicle. As far as a tow brake is concerned, your available options will get your head spinning. There are pros and cons to each. Some are installed and left in for-good. Others are less intrusive and can be used in various tow vehicles, but can be cumbersome because you remove them before driving the vehicle. Any tow bar and tow brake setup will require a minimum of - tow bar - tow bar bracket (permanently installed on your tow vehicle) - 2 safety cables (colored light blue in the picture below) - umbilical cord (for tow brake and tow vehicle lighting, the red coily) Many setups will also have a thin break-away cable (see picture) which activates the tow brake in the event of a total accidental separation between vehicles while being towed. Pending vehicle height mismatch, you may require a hitch riser (see picture), then "Quiet Hitch" brackets are recommended (also in the picture) If the tow brake installation is done cheap and dirty, you could have an additional umbilical cord to support the tow brake independent of lighting. https://live.staticflickr.com/2885/9398957260_f31c2c27f1_z.jpg width=640 The above picture is our setup, a 4300 pound 2006 Jeep Liberty towed by a 2007 E350 chassis, a Phoenix Cruiser 2350 motor home with a 5000 pound hitch. I installed a UNIFIED TOW BRAKE, a system that is installed and left inside our Liberty all the time. Our previous tow vehicle was a 2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder that weighed 2100 pounds. We got by without a tow braking system which to be honest with you, was marginal. Surprisingly, that light weight vehicle pushed hard when braking the motor home. https://live.staticflickr.com/4160/34202273876_17c74d0181_z.jpg width=640
ron.dittmer 07/02/19 06:02am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Microwave over the range: what's difference

The microwave in our unit is in a cabinet. Winnebago did an incredibly poor job of installing it; I'm still kind of amazed that it didn't fall out, and I recently completed a re-engineering of the installation. I concur: fasten it twice as well as you think you need to.CLICK HERE to read and see how I dealt with our microwave/convection oven that had always come loose. I still check it at the beginning of the RV season but things stay tight.
ron.dittmer 06/30/19 04:28am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Looking for a Class C. No cabover with washer combo.

I’m counting outside and inside. Most DPs and Super Cs have 2-3 out side and 2-3 inside. My Fleetwood has two out side three inside. Foretravels have one outside and I think one inside. Airstream TT have one outside none inside. Class Cs have one outside.So I assume your Airstream takes two steps to get inside. The second step is the main floor. Most typical class Cs have one more than that.
ron.dittmer 06/29/19 06:34pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Which shocks IF...

Ron, of course if your heavy duty front shocks also mean that they're stiffer shocks - then your front ride could be rougher than necessary for two reasons -> under loaded front coil springs plus shocks that don't compress/extend as easily. Do you have rear air bags that you can adjust to permanently raise the rear and hence transfer more weight unto the front?Raising the rear does not transfer any significant amount of weight to the front, any more than parking on a slight hill does. Probably a pet walking from the rear to the front of the motor home causes about as much weight transfer. I guess if you raise the rear by several feet things would start to be a little different....I believe the most influential factor is that our E350 is 23'-8" long with a 158" wheelbase resulting in a significant rear overhang. Then adding that our fresh water tank is against the rear wall (and we always carry a full tank), the teeter-totter effect lifts & lightens the front axle. Regarding the heavy duty Bilstein shocks I recently installed, they are the right choice for our rig today. I don't feel they would be a problem with the next lower coil spring rate. When the teeter goes totter, they should do well in cancelling it regardless of the spring rate.
ron.dittmer 06/27/19 08:50pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Which shocks IF...

Ron, That cupping on your right tire looked very much like the tires on our C. Unfortunately this happened after we put new shocks on. The tire mfg said it was due to us not rotating the tires. However, Michelin dealer claimed it was due to an out-of-balance issue caused by a belt failure... who knows! I put a new set of Michelins on and are watching them closely so as to not revisit this same issue down the road. GaryHi Gary, I was at an automotive workshop where "cupping" like I have was discussed. The person giving the lecture said "cupping" is caused from an improper alignment. I do wonder if our lighter-weighted front wheel alignment which was compensated through off-set bushings, would have been better addressed through replacing the front coil springs with E150 springs. The front coil springs on my E350 Super Duty chassis handle 4600 pounds. My on-trip loaded rig with us in the front two seats, the entire front end weighs only 3260 pounds. The E150 coil springs handle 3900 pounds, still too much, but closer to the actual load. Because my front coil springs are rated so much more than my actual load, my front end sits higher than it should. The offset bushings installed addressed the positive camber created from the condition, but I feel the better solution are lower-rated front springs. Not just for alignment purposes, but also to provide a more comfortable ride. The heavy duty shocks should keep the front end under proper control to prevent any extra porpoising. Ron Dittmer 2007 Phoenix Cruiser motor home built on a Ford E350-V10 Super Duty chassis with OEM 158" wheel base
ron.dittmer 06/27/19 07:12am Class C Motorhomes
RE: Looking for a Class C. No cabover with washer combo.

Our low profile Phoenix Cruiser on an E350 has 3 steps to get into the house. Inside, there is only a 2 inch increase in height from the cab floor to house floor. Our 3 steps are fairly shallow.
ron.dittmer 06/25/19 08:52pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Quality Class C 24’ for towing boat

Towing anything including a boat that weighs 3500 pounds should not be an issue with any DRW motor home including an E350 Ford and 3500 Chevy, as long as the tongue weight is under 500 pounds. For at least 12 years now, motor home hitches have a rating of 5000 pounds, and most recently increased to 7500 pounds. One thing to consider is the approach angle launching a boat into the water. You might consider a front tow bar with a ball hitch so you can launch the boat with the front of the motor home facing the water. Launching rearward as is normal, the rear extended overhang of the RV could be a problem on certain boat ramps, causing the boat trailer hitch to go too high in the air before the RV starts down the ramp.
ron.dittmer 06/24/19 06:31pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Installed a new damper

Back in 2007 after our rig was a few months old, I took it to a truck/RV suspension shop to address handling issues. One of the upgrades was replacing the stock steering stabilizer damper with a much bigger Safe-T-Plus version. It was worth the money for the improvement it made, but I don't know if something more affordable may have been just as effective. As I recall, our original black stock steering damper and shocks all had something stamped into them implying "Made For Ford by Monroe". Reiterating that the replacement Bilstein HD shocks I installed last year 2018 have been awesome.
ron.dittmer 06/24/19 11:43am Class C Motorhomes
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