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 > Your search for posts made by 'toedtoes' found 646 matches.

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RE: Anybody else have trouble packing for camping

It's not that simple. I don't hate it, but I don't love it either. Food is my biggest problem - sometimes forgetting something important. We hardly ever camp anywhere near a store and I don't want to spend my camping time shopping anyway. Way back when the kids were with us -- I will never forget the time I forgot the marshmallows for the fire... I do plan meals and make lists, but even with that, last time I forgot butter. I had all the makings for grilled cheese, but no butter. Surprisingly mayo worked - no change in taste. :C See, I'm just the opposite. Meals for me can be quite simple. A couple of hot dogs over the fire and a potato baked in the coals will suffice. If all else fails I can heat a can of something up on my campers stove. I have friends like you that are into large complicated meals but, that's not for me. To each their own but, maybe changing your diet/food habits to make them simpler will make getting ready for camping easier for you. I forget the butter a lot. I stuck on note in the camper so that I remember. That helps me a lot. I don't consider grilled cheese a large complicated meal.
toedtoes 11/28/19 01:26pm General RVing Issues
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

I'd sure love to see the source of that story...
toedtoes 11/27/19 08:13am Travel Trailers
RE: Do your dogs/cats watch TV

Should I be concerned? The Cat in Training, who watches tv a lot, just took my debit card from me... Have there been any "as seen on tv" cat stuff???
toedtoes 11/26/19 12:32am RV Pet Stop
RE: Large dog

The problem with most of these insurance bans is in the way they handle mixed breed dogs. They will require you to identify the mixed breed dog as a combination of two and only two breeds. They will not accept "shepherd mix" but they won't accept "shepherd/lab/chow/poodle/golden" either. Instead they require you to choose two of those breeds. So you choose "shepherd/lab" and everything is good. But if you choose "shepherd/chow", they say the dog is banned. It's the same dog with the same risk. This is the biggest problem with breed bans. They are based on appearance and a simplified understanding of genetics. My rescue group took in two sibling puppies. They were at least husky and shepherd. The male looked like a husky and acted like a shepherd. The female looked like a shepherd and acted like a husky. People saw the "shepherd" and expected a dog like their beloved shepherd - loyal, dedicated, eager to please. It was extremely difficult to get them to accept that she was not that shepherd. She was always thinking how to outsmart you, she got bored easily and found things to occupy her mind, and she didn't care if you liked it or not. I turned down many a home because they couldn't see past her appearance. Genetics means that the puppies get half the dna from mama and half from papa. But each puppy gets those halves randomly. Add in that few dogs are just one or two breeds and that causes even more differences. So you can have three puppies from the same litter and all three will be different. One may have more chow appearance but more lab personality. Another may have more beagle looks and personality. And the third may have the coat of a lab, the shape of a beagle, the scenting instincts of a beagle, and the protectiveness of a chow. But they are all the same mix breed. Which do you ban? The standard is to ban by appearance - so you've banned the dog with the lab personality and accepted the dog with the chow protectiveness. Which is more likely to bite due to "breed"???
toedtoes 11/24/19 12:18pm General RVing Issues
RE: Do your dogs/cats watch TV

My Bat-dog used to howl with one specific song, Since I Met You Baby. Billie Swan sings and Boots Randolph llays the sax. Bat-dog would howl along with the sax. Something about the tone just spoke to her. She still pays attention to the song, but doesn't get into a full singalong - just more of a humming along. Dog-bird calls for his flock daily. The dogs will spend 10-15 minutes howling back their response. Every day.
toedtoes 11/23/19 02:26pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Do your dogs/cats watch TV

The Cat in Training loves to watch tv. His favorite is Nature - he loves watching the big cats hunt. Then he practices what he learned on The Cat. He watches regular "people" shows too. He also plays with shadows and light beams. The Cat will watch for a moment or two, but isn't really into it. Bat-dog used to watch when she was young. Moose-dog has never watched. My Dog used to love to watch Wishbone and Frasier - she had a thing for jack russells. She watched other shows too, but those were her favorites. She and Moose-dog watched Balto all the way through. Never had a dog watch a cartoon before. Every one of my dogs is required to watch the vampire dog episode of Forever Knight. They need to understand the meaning of loyalty... :) I had a prior cat who loved to watch baby kittens on tv.
toedtoes 11/22/19 08:08pm RV Pet Stop
RE: Anybody else have trouble packing for camping

I always enjoy the planning portion (which includes packing) of a trip. Some ideas that might make it easier for folks: 1. Packing cubes. These are great to pack clothes in. Each family member can have their own color. They fit a lot in a small space. And when not in use, they take up no space. A week or two before the trip, give each member their cube(s). They lay it out in their room and start adding clothes. Each person should have everything they need in their cube three days before you leave. At that time, you can review the kids' clothes to make sure they didn't skip the undies or such. If something is missing, you have time to do a load of laundry, etc. without rushing the morning of the trip. If everything is good, the cube gets zipped up and moved to the "loading zone". Once in the loading zone, no one but you touches it. 2. For little kids, make them a list of what to pack for clothes. If they can't read or count, use pictures or stickers of shirts, pants, shorts, etc. If they need two pairs of shorts, have two pictures of shorts. When they see a picture of shorts, they add a pair to the list, then X off that one picture. If there is a second picture of shorts, they add another pair and X off the second photo. This gets them doing the bulk of the work and you just need to verify everything is there. 3. Keep an extra set of toothbrushes, toothpaste, combs, brushes, etc., in a travel case for the family. It is only used for travel. If you can't leave it in the camper, then store it in the linen closet. When it's time to travel, pull it and place it in the "loading zone". 4. Give each kid a packing cube for toys, electronics, etc. Whatever you let them take. Within your rules, they can pack whatever they want in this cube. But, if they forgot their game boy, that's their problem. Thy can do without. This puts responsibility on them with repercussions - yet doesn't leave them without undies or a toothbrush. If the trip will have specific activities (e.g., swimming pool, snow, etc.), let them know so they can add stuff made for those activities. 5. Embrace online shopping. Make your meal plan several weeks out. Try to coordinate so you use up everything you bring. Once the plan is made, go to the online shopping site of your grocery store and add everything you don't already have to the cart. The week before the trip, go through the cart and make any necessary changes. Order for delivery/pickup the day before you leave. When the groceries arrive at home, immediately load them in the camper, cooler, etc. Then load any food you are pulling from the house. 6. Filling water tank/jugs, getting gas, etc., should all be done at least one weekend before the trip. Exception is if you tow vehicle is your daily driver - in that case, fill up the afternoon before. 7. The "loading zone". This is the space in the garage/house allotted for camping supplies that need to be loaded. No one but you is allowed to add or remove anything from this spot. Major items (bedding, etc.) can be put here as soon as you have it ready. Personal gear (each member's packing cubes) are only put here once you've verified the contents. These are moved into the camper as soon as everything is accounted for. This eliminates the "did I already load that". For me, I like to have everything loaded and ready by the weekend before the trip, with the exception of food. This way, I can relax the last 2-7 days instead of stressing. Food gets picked up early the day before and immediately loaded. If a food item is out of stock, I can make a quick stop at another store to pick it up before the trip without adding a lot of stress.
toedtoes 11/22/19 02:14pm General RVing Issues
RE: Best type of house battery

I agree that if you are always hooked up then a basic battery is fine. But for me, I rarely have hookups (except at home), so I have a group 31 Optima blue top battery. It has plenty of juice for my needs - I can camp 2 weeks without running it down - and I don't need to fuss with it. Because it's a marine dual purpose, I can use it to jumpstart the engine if needed.
toedtoes 11/21/19 03:42pm Fifth-Wheels
RE: Website Host

I use startlogic. I've been happy with them for years. Haven't had problems with glitches, etc.
toedtoes 11/21/19 01:46pm Technology Corner
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

I suspect it will be a good long time. I suppose this is my greatest letdown of technology: it "simplifies" things that are already simple. How about technology so I don't have to stand in the rain filling my fuel tank. Or technology that will open the can of catfood and pour it in the catbowls when the cat meows so I don't have to wake up at 5 am to do it. Instead they voice activate what I already have a remote control to do.
toedtoes 11/21/19 01:38pm Travel Trailers
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

I think there's a difference between "embracing" new technology and "accepting" it. There are some things I embraced: ereaders, mp3 players, etc - because they were of benefit to me (not having to carry all those CDs and books around). Other things I accepted: flat tvs - I didn't buy one until my old tv died because there was no benefit to do so; I see voice activated things as in the accepting category. There is no benefit to me for telling the tv to turn on, when I can push a button to do it. Now if I could say "dump the black and grey tanks" and it hooked up the hoses and dumped into the sewer without my having to lift a finger, well then I would embrace it.
toedtoes 11/21/19 01:17pm Travel Trailers
RE: Yes boys and girls, you REALLY need to carry a spare...

That's why I got a Garmin inReach. And for a few extra dollars per year, it includes emergency insurance for just type of thing.
toedtoes 11/20/19 01:25pm Class C Motorhomes
RE: Large dog

Bobbo - that puppy would still be doing that to her today! My dad's akitas loved to climb up my mom to see out the living room window... One offered to trade his favorite toy for my sibling's baby. I took in one my dad rescued (only animal he ever took in like that). Bear-dog was 3 yrs old and had never been outside his kennel in the prior owner's backyard. Taking him for a walk was like Ferdinand the Bull - this massive dog stopping to smell every flower he came across. He was very friendly but shy. He loved my dad dearly. Once my dad stopped by to drop something off and came in to use the bathroom. He w as in a hurry and went back out and drove away. The akita sat by the door for 6 hours waiting for him to come back in to say hello to him. My dad never did that again. And I still have the Christmas photo of him and his sister Dog with Santa. He loved that huge stuffed toy the moment he saw it. Then, it spoke and Bear-dog realized there was a MAN in that stuffed toy! The photo shows Bear-dog trying to get as far away from Santa as possible, Santa leaning over trying to keep hold of Bear-dog, and Dog being pulled along.
toedtoes 11/20/19 01:22pm General RVing Issues
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

From what I saw, butts were just as big. But when you only got 4-6 channels (NBC, PBS, CBS, ABC, and maybe two "uhf" stations), and they were able to fill their programming with non-repeated shows for the most part, there wasn't as much need to change channels. Nowadays, you have 100+ channels that repeat the same episode a good 10 times throughout the week, you have to do a lot more channel surfing to see something new. Sometimes more isn't better.
toedtoes 11/20/19 08:10am Travel Trailers
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

I use the technology I need and leave the rest to others. Next on my list of needs is, a car to drive me to the skeet range. A car that comes curbside to pick me up at the mall, after it found its own parking space. Home and RV, I have what I need, though a rear mounted camera might be nice. How about a rat chauffeured car: the rats
toedtoes 11/19/19 09:09pm Travel Trailers
RE: Large dog

Dodgeguy qnd Cferguson - my dad had akitas and showed them. The males are really big goofballs. The females could be very territorial and their prey instinct was much stronger than with the males.
toedtoes 11/19/19 09:04pm General RVing Issues
RE: Voice Controlled Travel Trailer

I admit, I have never found this technology that interesting to begin with. At home, I find a remote works just fine. And I don't risk Alexa going off on a psychotic rage and trying to kill me (that's what they always do in the movies). If I don't need it in an 1100sq ft home, then I don't need it in a 100sq ft RV.
toedtoes 11/19/19 01:45pm Travel Trailers
RE: Current crop of SUV'S

But the higher percentage of smaller vehicles in a given number of vehicles the more room everybody has to miss the impact all together. That's assuming they maintain the same amount of space as if they were larger vehicles. The truth is that they will cram more of their little cars into the same space. The best way to prevent accidents isn't to drive a smaller vehicle. The best way is to maintain a safe distance between you and the vehicle in front of you regardless of size. Stop worrying about keeping that other car from moving into your lane in front of you and you will be a lot safer. Realizing that if you can keep the traffic moving past exits, rather than bottlejamming, by maintaining space to let others move over and exit, you will get to your destination faster and safer than if you block that space between you and the car in front of you.
toedtoes 11/19/19 01:30pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Current crop of SUV'S

Just heard. Ford is coming out with an electric Mustang SUV... Well those are 3 words that certainly don’t go together! Lol That's what I thought. Here it is: https://jalopnik.com/2020-ford-mustang-mach-e-heres-the-car-price-and-0-60-1839875945
toedtoes 11/19/19 12:39pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Large dog

There are ways to mitigate certain things that folks think are requirements with dog ownership. First, walking the dog so it can go potty. Teach your dog to go potty at home not during a 10-20 minute walk. I have never owned a dog, large or small, who required walking. Walking is a fun activity not a prelude to bathroom functions. When it's raining, my dogs can do their business in just a couple minutes in their own yard/campsite and come back inside where it's dry. They do not need to go to another yard or campsite to do so regardless of the weather. This makes it easier to deal with doggie business in the rain AND reduces friction with other campers (my dogs don't poop in or alongside their campsites). Walks are reserved for entertainment. An ocassional poop happens during a walk, but it's not a regular event that other campers are subject to. Second, most dogs just want to be with you. They can usually handle less activity than people think. There are three types of large dogs: physically hyperactive (labs, aussies, etc.), mentally hyperactive (huskies, jack russells, etc.), and the rest. Physically hyperactive need a ton of exercise to get to settle down. As they age this will decrease, but when young it can require a lot of effort. Only dog I ever had to crate was a 6 month old black lab who could not settle down at night because every single sound had her bouncing. Every other dog (any age) learned quickly to sleep at night and relax when inside. These dogs are hyperactive long into their adulthood. Their hyperactiveness tends to override their desire to please you. It is different than just being a puppy because it doesn't ease up with a 20 minute walk - they need to physically exhaust themselves to be able to relax for even a few minutes. Mentally hyperactive are the most difficult. With these dogs, no amount of physical exercise will be enough. They need mental stimulation constantly. They need to use their brains - if you don't give them something mental to do, they will think up something on their own and I can pretty much guarantee you won't like it. They enjoy out-thinking you more than anything else. For the "normal" ones, they love to play and take long walks, etc., but they will adjust nicely to a less active lifestyle. Their main desire is to be with you regardless of what you are doing and they will adjust in order to please you. They may be playful and enjoy a game of catch, etc., but they can relax even if they don't get it.
toedtoes 11/19/19 08:12am General RVing Issues
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