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 > Your search for posts made by 'tommyznr' found 27 matches.

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RE: Solar research

As I understand it he wants to create a shoreline power source using solar/batteries/inverter/transfer switch/generator without any modifications to the RV. This is very doable with the correct equipment and many have done so. This is correct. I found that the Kisae IC122055 has the built in transfer switch option that I was looking for. That is great to hear. Your question caused me to rethink a land opportunity I have in remote northern Wisconsin where it would cost an arm and a leg to bring utility power to the site. I could have my own camping spot on a fairly large chunk of land with solar/generator power based in a shed.
tommyznr 05/26/21 10:32am Travel Trailers
RE: Solar research

Sorry, question does not make any sense. Solar is for charging your batteries. Solar is not a 3rd power source to be confused with shoreline and generator, which are AC not Dc. All that solar does is bring more DC power to the battery. Everything powered by your battery is already set up, you do not need to make any alterations. Now, if you meant to ask about having an auto switch to choose between 1 of 3: shoreline, generator and inverter then that makes more sense. What is your priority? Shoreline > generator > inverter? Set a switch to choose between generator and inverter and to favor the generator so when the generator is on the switch switches to generator power. Then another switch that choses between that first switch's choice and shoreline power. So your "AC power" will choose from shoreline or those other two (gen or inv), which will chose between the gen or inv. My "auto" switch is a circuit breaker that turns one circuit on and turns the other circuit off at the same time, so only one can be on at a time (shoreline and generator). Then behind that is another selector that (inverter) does not have a route to the Air Cond, battery charger or to the Fridge plugs, so there is no way you try to power up those with battery. Is this your question? As I understand it he wants to create a shoreline power source using solar/batteries/inverter/transfer switch/generator without any modifications to the RV. This is very doable with the correct equipment and many have done so.
tommyznr 05/21/21 12:25pm Travel Trailers
RE: Solar research

Watching some Will Prouse videos is a great start as well as visiting his forum DIY Solar Forumhttps://diysolarforum.com/. Every additional feature that you want/need adds significant sophistication but there is a lot of help out there. If you are up to the challenge, the following may be helpful: Start with an energy audit, a spreadsheet can be found on the DIY forum. This will help clarify what you need to do. As stated previously a combination inverter/charger/transfer switch will do what you want it to do. But you might not need this depending how you want to source your energy. Search Victron, GoPower, Cotek and the previously suggested Samlex for these (plus many others). If you have a 50A RV your options will be more limited if you want to utilize all of your 120VAC circuits vs a 30A version. The 2000/3000W and up versions tend to have more features. Victron has a lot of training available on their site. You can also have separate inverter, charger and transfer switch. I priced this out for my application and found that the separate units that I would need would be about $100 less than a combination unit, not including wiring/fusing/etc. This is mainly because I have a 50A RV and I don’t want to rewire my power panel. For batteries find and watch a video comparing the lifecycle cost comparison between various types and lithium. For some situations lithium is cheaper and you do not need to pay close attention to DOD of the batteries. You might also be able to utilize the all in one unit if desirable.
tommyznr 05/20/21 08:23am Travel Trailers
RE: Buy new now or wait until end of summer

If you have to sell yours in the same time frame as when you buy then what’s the difference? You sell/buy at higher price now vs sell/buy lower price later. I guess the advantage to doing it now is you know what the market is, if you wait until later, you hope you know what the market will be. I used to be like you and try to figure out what the best timing is to get that slight advantage. You win some you lose some. Now I do things when I want and don’t worry about if I could have saved down the road. I must be getting old.
tommyznr 05/14/21 09:42am General RVing Issues
RE: What is the Passport America plan

valhalla360. has an aguably valid point as it applies to camps with strong weekend and event occupancy with weekday vacancy. . Many PPA parks we have encountered benefit some from the dynamic pricing PPA affords during those off peak periods. We have also seen unscrupulous operators who designate only their worst nearly unusable sites as a ' bait and switch' and dishonest guests with expired cards flashing it to get the discount. The reason there are well less than 10% of commercial camps participating in PPA shows that in each location the factors of occupancy vs cost still must be positive for the operator. Occupancy, beyond static cost can add staffing, disrupt groundskeeping maintenance, and more. Utility, labor , supply and waste costs are static. In our part of the country, where there is no city with more than 60k people within 6 hrs drive there is no weekend glut, a wednesday is the same as a saturday. Noone drives 6 hrs for a weekend getaway. They do for a week or longer holiday and vacation. 6 national parks, dozens of state parks, in the same travel time from those big population centers with no dynamic pricing draws the short stay bunch- if they can snag a reservation- In considering wheather a park joins, or you join, consider your travel plans, the area and the parks region. In areas hours away from cities you wont find deep discount parks. If you do, be wary, you may get what you pay for, or for full price what you wish for. Do you have any evidence to back up claims of people being given undesirable/unusable sites? Given that you are saying it about your competition and appear to be against the program, evidence to support your claims appears warranted. We used 18 different parks this past winter all across the country. We've done similar numbers in past years. Never saw any evidence of what you describe. I suspect most parks aren't too worried about the validity of the users card. Most never ask to see it. I don't know the internal finances but I'm guessing the parks don't get anything directly from the cost of the card (that probably goes almost exclusively to the PPA corporation), so they don't have a strong incentive to turn away a potential sale. You can argue that's not right but that's between the parks and the PPA corporation. Occupancy does have some costs but not much. The vast majority of costs are present if a site is empty or full mid week. It would be a very odd situation if the incremental costs exceeded even 10% of the regular rate, so getting 50% still leaves a lot of room for profit. Unless you are at 0% occupancy mid week, grounds have to work around campers and you have to keep staff around the office for check in and other customer questions. Of course if it doesn't meet your parks needs, don't join. But dire unsupported warnings come across as bitter.Here are few few costs of occupancy off the top of my head. Electricity, water, sewer, credit card fees, labor to check in, clean sites, remove trash, answer questions, handle issues etc. Then there is the potential costs of pet waste, bathroom supplies, hot water heating costs for showers and a reserve for damages that must be spread over every guest because stuff does happen.. Then there is the unspoken fact that there is a value attached to providing a service. Just like a plumber won’t come to your house for $20.00 on his day off even though it would be incremental revenue I am not willing to service a guest for less than what I charge the average customer. If my normal rate is $60.00 and my incremental cost is $10.00 I am willing to do the work involved for the $50.00 gross profit. And just like the plumber I am not willing to do it for $20.00. My time is more valuable than that. Like he said, if it doesn't meet your needs then don't join but you really didn't have much of an argument against his main point. A plumber gets paid time and materials, some add minimum charges. You don't have that business model. Using your business model you would charge $60 to every customer whether you replaced an entire system or unclogged a drain. Your real costs of occupancy are electricity penny for penny of what the customer uses and water/sewer penny for penny if you are on a municipal system. The rest is some portion of overhead based on overall occupancy. Based on your responses, I would guess that you are an owner/operator who lives on site with little or no staff and you are somewhat working 24/7 even if you have specific office hours. If that is the case then, yes, each of those tasks takes away from something else you could be doing. I would guess that outside what has already been mentioned, parks that belong to a club like this view the reduced occupancy fees as a sort of advertising budget. That is, they get into some publication and maybe a phone app and this is the cost they are willing to pay for that publicity.
tommyznr 05/14/21 08:15am General RVing Issues
RE: Potentially dangerous mistake in March RV Magazine

I watched folks do it in that order (Unhook,, watch Trailer roll toward lake. Try to stop it (Fail) thankfully there was dirt and the tong jack dug in and stopped it before splash. then they chocked and re-hooked repositioned and rechocked before unhooking again . Oh if you do forget.. Grab the break-away brake wire It is not strong enough to stop the trailer from rolling but when the pin comes out of teh clothspin switch .. Brakes ON. Or better yet, don't disconnect the breakaway cable from your tow vehicle until after you release from the hitch..... advice that should also be in the article referenced in the OP.
tommyznr 03/03/21 11:14am General RVing Issues
RE: College age kids and working remote Floor plan

We were in the same position two years ago minus the work from home situation. Our kids 18, 22 and 24 at the time still camped with us 90% of trips. We went for the “couples” 5th wheel as you say, or as we put it a “mom and dad camper”. Grand Design Reflection 295RL with a master bedroom and rear living area with a pull-out couch and two recliners, under 33 feet so we fit most anywhere we want. Our approach was that we wanted a camper that would suit us in 10 years, not one for the kids now. It was a great decision. When the kids come with us they figure out how to make it work or pitch a tent. Already at 20, 24 and 26, two of them are on their own and have their own tents anyway so they pitch a tent on our site or get a tent site nearby. The third one has a tent on order which will be delivered today. We just planned three trips for the summer and all three are planning to join us at some point during each trip. As a bonus we get great pleasure in hearing about their own camping adventures without us.
tommyznr 02/05/21 09:33am General RVing Issues
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