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 > Your search for posts made by 'twodownzero' found 610 matches.

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RE: Can my truck tow this?

"Thanks for the explanation, but ya made up the 8klb towing capacity thing." This^^^^The OPs truck has a GVWR of 7K, and a GCWR of 15K, but his truck does not weigh anywhere near 7K as it left the factory. For example, if his truck has a payload sticker on the door jam stating not to exceed 1500 lbs, would mean it weighed 5500, when it left the factory. So for example, the OP has added 500 lbs of stuff, would be a curb wt of 6K, allowing another 9K, actually 9400 stated, before reaching the GCWR of 15K. So while many ratings will be close, the only real concern, safety wise is the factory receiver, that can be replaced. Of course the operators experience/ability towing a large trailer is always a concern, even with a more capable truck. Jerry The curb weight of a crew cab 4wd Silverado 1500 is over 5,000 pounds, but I assumed it was 5k pounds to be modest in my rounding. It might be more like 5,300 pounds depending on how equipped. If you take the 5k pound curb weight, add 1000 pounds of tongue weight, and a 200 pound driver, you have 800 pounds of payload remaining for passengers, additional tongue weight due to trailer loading, the hitch itself, etc. If you want to quibble about those how those 800 pounds get eaten up, then so be it, but I suspect that most of us don't tow our trailers with only one person in a 4 door cab, and that 800 pounds will be quickly gone with 3 more passengers and their stuff, and even then, that assumes that nothing you put in the trailer itself raises the tongue weight, which is of course not the case and would not be safe or stable. A more realistic estimate would add 2-300 pounds of tongue weight from loading the trailer, which leaves 500 pounds of remaining payload for your passengers, cargo, and hitch. That's going to be awfully close, if not overloaded. And in any event, GVWR is going to be at or near max in realistic loading. As such, the tow capacity is 8k pounds (the remaining GCWR), not anywhere near 9,400. And it's never going to be even close to that 9,400 in real use. That is why "tow capacity" is ****. If it was a 14k lb GVWR truck that weighed 8k empty, you'd be onto something. But with a truck that has so little payload to begin with, the realistic towing capacity is much closer to GCWR - GVWR than it is the manufacturer's stated hypothetical tow capacity. Replacing the factory hitch receiver is obviously demanded as well, and once again, that means that you'll be adding weight to the truck and decreasing payload. That said, this is critical--it is never safe to overload a trailer hitch or any component of that system.
twodownzero 12/03/19 12:13pm Tow Vehicles
RE: Can my truck tow this?

Thanks for the explanation, but ya made up the 8klb towing capacity thing. Uh, no I didn't. It's simple arithmetic. GCWR - GVWR = 8k pounds. It's in the specs for the vehicle. You can retort and suggest that perhaps assuming GVWR is maxed is excessive. My response to that is 1) the vehicle is over 5k pounds to begin with, 2) the trailer has a tongue weight of over 1k pounds empty, and 3) the weight of the hitch itself and passengers, plus any additional tongue weight from trailer loading must be considered. Even assuming 15% loaded tongue weight, it is not unreasonable at all to conclude, by these deductive methods, that the truck will be at max GVWR or more with this trailer behind. We can go back and forth about how much the driver weighs, the hitch, etc., but the fact is that we have 2k pounds of payload, of which over 50% is gone from empty, unloaded tongue weight alone, and another 10% will be gone as soon as a driver gets inside. If you want to quibble over the remaining 800 pounds (of which the hitch itself will eat some), then so be it. Well, I suppose it's my turn to chime in. I'm not going to give any information on what can or cannot tow, how much anything can tow, or even should I tow it answers. Nah! My approach is quite different.... Here's the basic tenant when it comes to settling the question... "Can I tow it?" Here goes.... If you had to ask the question in he first place, well??? probably not! Why? Because you have doubts YOURSELF, regardless of now much pro-or-con and tit-for-tat goes on, on these forum discussions. The bottom line is, the original poster has doubts. And regardless of anyone's answer, he will always have doubts. And if anyone has any doubts, or concerns, or speculations about the ability of their tow vehicle and the trailer being towed, (they, you, or me) will NEVER have 100% confidence! And that ... will always ... result in a white-knuckle drive. If you had to ask, you have doubts. You've just answered your own question. In the world of qualitative answers to the question presented, I couldn't have said it better myself. Assuming the concerns addressed are based on some sort of rational approach, I couldn't agree more. I'm skeptical what the "tow package" includes if your truck has 3.23 gears, by the way. A hitch receiver is not a "tow package." Get your head out of the 1970's. The days of 3-speed transmissions and needing 4.10 gears to tow an empty wheelbarrow are long gone. This truck has an 8-speed transmission with a super deep first gear, and well spaced gears between there and the double overdrive. Where you get the gear reduction is irrelevant, as long as you have it available. 3.23 is a perfectly fine towing gear. Oooh, good one. What percentage of full size pickups come with gears that high? Does Ford even offer a 3.23 on an F-150? Even within GM sales numbers or on a dealer's lot, what percentage of trucks do you think come with 3.23 gears? I bet it's not many. Where you get the gear reduction is a big deal for the transmission if you want it to last. I'm sure rebuilding that 8 speed transmission isn't cheap.
twodownzero 12/03/19 11:26am Tow Vehicles
RE: Can my truck tow this?

To the OP, no one is suggestion that you have the ultimate tow vehicle. But rather, it's adequate. As a number of people have demonstrated above, it may not be adequate, and it may actually be dangerous. I think there are some simple numbers here that show this is not a viable combination. 15,000 lb GCWR - 7000 lb tow vehicle leaves, realistically, 8,000 pounds of towing capacity, not 9,400. The 9,400 pound towing capacity is based on the unrealistic expectation of you only having a 150 pound driver in the truck, which is ridiculous. You may squeeze another 500 pounds out of it, but remember that the tongue weight and the weight of the hitch have to come from that GVWR number. The curb weight of the truck is not mentioned, but given that the payload of a truck like this likely inadequate for a trailer this heavy, assuming GVWR as the weight of the tow vehicle is not unrealistic at all (note posters above talking about 20% tongue weight, which itself will probably eat all of the payload before the driver even gets in the truck). I'm skeptical what the "tow package" includes if your truck has 3.23 gears, by the way. A hitch receiver is not a "tow package." With 8,000 pounds of towing capacity, it is not realistic to believe that a trailer with a 7,500 pound empty weight will ever be even close to within ratings. At a bare minimum, you need 1,000 pounds for your gear, water, propane, batteries, etc. The only way to know for sure is to weigh the empty combination and load accordingly, but I'm willing to bet that GVWR is busted right out of the gate way before you get near the 15k lb. GCWR, and let's face it, a combination of vehicles with 16k+ pounds of rating and a 15k lb. GCWR is going to be very tight on numbers regardless. With careful loading and a good hitch, it may not be completely terrifying, but I would bet that in real world use, this combination would be significantly overloaded. A 1/2 ton truck, especially a 4 door, 4wd one with all the options, is better suited to a 25' travel trailer than one that is 30'+ in length. As you'll probably note from my past posts, I will never own a 1/2 ton truck again, but ultimately it's because the truck itself is not rated to support the payload needed for heavier trailers that becomes a problem. The rationale for those ratings is soft suspension, p-metric tires, and a semi floating rear axle--all things easily solved by buying the right truck for the load. We're all guessing as to how close or far you'll be, but I suspect you're way further than you think from this being safe or advisable. Well there ya go making up numbers about vehicles you don't have knowledge about to support your "case". It doesn't sound so dramatic if you use the actual numbers and they actually work though. Carry on with the supposition and unsubstantiated paranoia... If you knew nothing else than the truck has 8,000 pounds of towing capacity and the trailer weighs 7,500 pounds empty, and the only answers were "yes" or "no" to the question presented, the only responsible answer is "no." Deductive reasoning is not "supposition" or "unsubstantiated paranoia." The curb weight of these trucks is not an unknown. Meaningful estimates of tongue weight are not hard to produce. Realistic expectations about towing capacity are possible without weighing the combination. If you want the short answer for the original poster, the answer is no. The rationale for why the answer is no is more complicated. It is hypothetically possible that this trailer could be towed, empty, with driver only in the truck, with the right hitch, and assuming the stated weights are accurate. It is unrealistic to believe that will be the case with water, propane, additional passengers, and basic household goods in the trailer, based on some simple arithmetic. If you want to call that supposition, then I wonder if you'd call a weight ticket the same thing. After all, if you didn't calibrate the load cell, it's lying, too, right? I always get a chuckle out of those that say not to tow with a half ton. My current F150 has better tow ratings than my chevy 3/4 ton has. Trucks have advanced leaps and bounds. Axle shafts and bearings are no bigger today than they were 30 years ago. I'm not sure what year 3/4 ton Chevy you're talking about, and whether we're talking about a 6 or 8 lug 3/4 ton, but it is very likely that is not the case. GCWR might have increased because engines have more power than ever, but that simply does not tell the whole story about the vehicle's capability. It really does people a disservice to have these low payload capacity trucks have the horsepower they have, because it's one thing to have a setup that moves well in traffic because it accelerates well and yet another thing to control, steer, and stop that mess in bad weather, wind, and other adverse towing conditions. That's when these things become dangerous. I can't imagine wanting to experience that while I am on vacation, supposed to be enjoying my leisure time.
twodownzero 12/03/19 09:53am Tow Vehicles
RE: Can my truck tow this?

To the OP, no one is suggestion that you have the ultimate tow vehicle. But rather, it's adequate. As a number of people have demonstrated above, it may not be adequate, and it may actually be dangerous. I think there are some simple numbers here that show this is not a viable combination. 15,000 lb GCWR - 7000 lb tow vehicle leaves, realistically, 8,000 pounds of towing capacity, not 9,400. The 9,400 pound towing capacity is based on the unrealistic expectation of you only having a 150 pound driver in the truck, which is ridiculous. You may squeeze another 500 pounds out of it, but remember that the tongue weight and the weight of the hitch have to come from that GVWR number. The curb weight of the truck is not mentioned, but given that the payload of a truck like this likely inadequate for a trailer this heavy, assuming GVWR as the weight of the tow vehicle is not unrealistic at all (note posters above talking about 20% tongue weight, which itself will probably eat all of the payload before the driver even gets in the truck). I'm skeptical what the "tow package" includes if your truck has 3.23 gears, by the way. A hitch receiver is not a "tow package." With 8,000 pounds of towing capacity, it is not realistic to believe that a trailer with a 7,500 pound empty weight will ever be even close to within ratings. At a bare minimum, you need 1,000 pounds for your gear, water, propane, batteries, etc. The only way to know for sure is to weigh the empty combination and load accordingly, but I'm willing to bet that GVWR is busted right out of the gate way before you get near the 15k lb. GCWR, and let's face it, a combination of vehicles with 16k+ pounds of rating and a 15k lb. GCWR is going to be very tight on numbers regardless. With careful loading and a good hitch, it may not be completely terrifying, but I would bet that in real world use, this combination would be significantly overloaded. A 1/2 ton truck, especially a 4 door, 4wd one with all the options, is better suited to a 25' travel trailer than one that is 30'+ in length. As you'll probably note from my past posts, I will never own a 1/2 ton truck again, but ultimately it's because the truck itself is not rated to support the payload needed for heavier trailers that becomes a problem. The rationale for those ratings is soft suspension, p-metric tires, and a semi floating rear axle--all things easily solved by buying the right truck for the load. We're all guessing as to how close or far you'll be, but I suspect you're way further than you think from this being safe or advisable.
twodownzero 12/03/19 08:17am Tow Vehicles
RE: Chucking....is it the trailer or the truck?

Just keep repeating to yourself - "Wow this tow so much better than a travel trailer" I'll try....but I have to admit that even though this 5th Wheel is a lot nicer rig than my last TT, it doesn't tow nearly as nice as the TT did. If you don't think your 5er tows better than any travel trailer, you need to investigate that hitch! My 5er tows better than any ball hitch trailer I've ever owned by a significant margin. It is a monster, heavy, etc., but it does not even move in the wind despite being a giant brick. If yours doesn't tow like that, some adjustment is needed!
twodownzero 12/02/19 11:46am Towing
RE: NM-26 Between Hatch and Deming, New Mexico

I always use the Hatch route. BTW, Hatch chilies are the best anywhere. If you go through there Thurs-Sunday stop in to Sparky's restaurant. +1 on Sparky's.
twodownzero 12/02/19 11:43am Roads and Routes
RE: Chucking....is it the trailer or the truck?

Chances are the fifth wheel hitch is mounted to far back. Being a short bed, the hitch is most likely mounted above center of axle if not behind center. Move the hitch forward to at least 2" ahead of center of axle, 4" is better yet. Not likely OP can do this being a short bed, because of cab to cap contact, great thought though. I would say time to hit the scales, and make sure he has 20% to 22% pin weight, then add shocks to the 5er. My auto slider is set up with the hitch as far forward as the adjustments allow. I'm sure others offer the same. I also pull with a short bed and the auto slider is the solution as I can have a tight fit and good stability going down the road but I don't have to worry about the trailer when turning at all. For the OP, I'd be more concerned that your truck is massively overloaded than a little bit of ride harshness. I see you mention that you haven't weighed it, I suggest you hit up the cat scale the next time you fill up with fuel. I can virtually guarantee it's going to be a huge eye opener.
twodownzero 12/02/19 07:54am Towing
RE: Question on using auto level while stored for the winter

Even an inch or two nose high will likely go a long way.
twodownzero 12/02/19 07:51am Fifth-Wheels
RE: Adding air bags: can that increase payload capacity?

I'm not aware of a state where the payload sticker means anything. Most of the time a 3/4 ton with properly rated bags or timbrens can carry a given load as well or better than the same model/year 3500. If the payload sticker is an issue for you, use a sharpie on it. What you really need to do is know what the law in your state says. Usually you can register your truck to carry or tow whatever you want. In my state it is not legal to license a vehicle for more than its rated capacity nor is a driver's license valid for use on our roadways if the vehicle is overloaded. If you block out your GVWR on the sticker, it's likely that you won't be able to register your vehicle at all here. In other states I've lived, plates are issued for a certain number of pounds that hits certain cutoffs in the law, 8k, 12k, etc. Here, my truck is registered for its GVWR, 9900 pounds, and not a single pound more or less. Not according to the New Mexico motor vehicle code in the link below. It states in section 66-3-1.2 that a vehicles registration is based upon "declared" gross weight not rated gross weight. The same as Texas and many other states. "66-3-1.2. REGISTRATION--DECLARED GROSS WEIGHT.--Except as otherwise provided by law, the division shall register each truck, truck tractor, road tractor and bus required to be registered under the international registration plan or reciprocal agreements with other jurisdictions for a declared gross weight not to exceed the legal limitation established by this state. " Also the fine is the same as well where you have to pay for the GVWR you got caught with for all the years you have owned the vehicle and you also have to register it with that GVWR from that moment on until you no longer own the vehicle. "66-3-21. VEHICLE EXCEEDING DECLARED GROSS WEIGHT.-- A. Except as otherwise provided by law, a vehicle or combination shall not be operated upon the public highways of this state when the gross vehicle weight or gross combination vehicle weight exceeds the declared gross weight. Any person violating the provisions of this section shall be: (1) assessed a penalty for the lapsed portion of the registration period in an amount equal to the difference between the fee for the declared gross weight and the fee for the gross vehicle weight or gross combination vehicle weight at which the vehicle or combination was weighed; and (2) required to register the vehicle or combination at the higher declared gross weight in accordance with the weight at the time of the violation for the remainder of the registration period and to pay that fee. B. Such registration shall not be construed to authorize the movement of loads in violation of the state's size and weight laws. " New Mexico Motor Vehicle Laws I'm not going to argue with you other than to say you are wrong. You have to dig into the regulations to figure out why, which I'm not inclined to do, but I have posted links to them on here before. It is not lawful to operate any vehicle in excess of its rated capacity in New Mexico and it violates at least two provisions of the motor vehicle code any time it occurs. If one is trailering while doing so, it is a third violation.
twodownzero 11/27/19 09:39am Tow Vehicles
RE: Adding air bags: can that increase payload capacity?

I'm not aware of a state where the payload sticker means anything. Most of the time a 3/4 ton with properly rated bags or timbrens can carry a given load as well or better than the same model/year 3500. If the payload sticker is an issue for you, use a sharpie on it. What you really need to do is know what the law in your state says. Usually you can register your truck to carry or tow whatever you want. In my state it is not legal to license a vehicle for more than its rated capacity nor is a driver's license valid for use on our roadways if the vehicle is overloaded. If you block out your GVWR on the sticker, it's likely that you won't be able to register your vehicle at all here. In other states I've lived, plates are issued for a certain number of pounds that hits certain cutoffs in the law, 8k, 12k, etc. Here, my truck is registered for its GVWR, 9900 pounds, and not a single pound more or less.
twodownzero 11/27/19 07:36am Tow Vehicles
RE: Upgraded F150 tires to E

New tires are always a wonderful addition to every vehicle. If I was made of money I'd probably get a new set every year just because I could. That said, proper LT tires, ideally E rated, are a must for me. C vs. E range is pretty much a no brainer. I'm not surprised one bit that you are happier with your LT rated tires vs. the P metric tires they replaced.
twodownzero 11/25/19 12:23pm Towing
RE: Operating on a 20amp circuit

A 20 amp 110 volt circuit probably has close to 100 times the amount of power available that I used on my most recent trip (solar, 12v, dry camping for ~5 days). You will be able to run your gas heat and water heater and electric fridge indefinitely on that much current. You might be surprised to learn that you seldom ever draw that much current from the grid even at your house unless your A/C is running, you're using big tools/welder/air compressors etc. Even with the use of your air conditioner, as some say above, as long as you didn't use any high draw devices at the same time, 20 amps is plenty.
twodownzero 11/22/19 08:27am Tech Issues
RE: Want to know how to weigh at a CAT scale?

You are correct that I did not click on the link and watch the video. I don't generally do that due to virus and security concerns, call me paranoid. I Know how to weigh and I had to learn also and I was not trying to be snarky here just pointing out there is a proper way to position on the scale which I myself screwed up the fiirst time I weighed my rig. I learned. I hope my comment only pointed out to actually look up the proper way to weigh. Thanks for pointing out an important aspect of safe towing though. I believe a lot of people don't do it and are actually over weight for their TV and push the limits of safety. Thanks again. If you don't want to review the topic that the thread is about, then why are you commenting? Also, if you genuinely think there are virus or security concerns with a youtube video, you probably shouldn't be on this forum, either.
twodownzero 11/22/19 08:23am Beginning RVing
RE: $600K Of Marijuana Seized in MH Near Joliet, IL

Wonder what the cops used for PC to search the RV? I mean, it was just a headlight violation after all. Just a guess but maybe it was the smell of 190 pounds of pot?? The article didn't say anything about a consent search. I'm guessing there was a dog involved. The odor of marijuana is probable cause. Repeat after me, I do not consent to a search of my person or belongings You clearly don't watch "Live PD". The police have the right to walk a drug-sniffing dog around your vehicle. They might, if they don't prolong the traffic stop as a result of running a dog. Keeping you there (at least unreasonably) longer to run a dog at a routine traffic stop is illegal everywhere.
twodownzero 11/20/19 07:48am General RVing Issues
RE: Rated engine power

In the US, all light duty vehicles are rated using the same testing procedures defined by the Society of Automotive Engineers. It is horsepower at the rear wheels with all accessories installed (A/C is likely turned off). When you get to medium duty vehicles, I believe the horsepower is measured "at the crankshaft", but again with all accessories (probably not A/C). The important thing is that it is done CONSISTENTLY across all manufacturers. SAE Net Horsepower includes all accessories and emission controls, but is measured at the crankshaft. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Horsepower#SAE_net_power
twodownzero 11/14/19 08:08am Tow Vehicles
RE: Cummins 5 year old synthetic oil with 1000 miles - change ?

I sent my oil in for analysis after ~4 years and 14,227 miles and it was still perfectly fine and I could have left it in there.
twodownzero 11/08/19 07:58am Class A Motorhomes
RE: 5th wheel clearance

I don't think that's enough clearance. I lowered my truck 2" in the back to deal with this problem. What kind of truck is it and is that an option for you?
twodownzero 11/07/19 07:57am Tow Vehicles
RE: Truck batteries

My Ram's batteries lasted from April 2005-May 2018. I hope the current set goes that long!
twodownzero 11/07/19 07:56am Tow Vehicles
RE: Where to jack

I put the jack directly under the axle.
twodownzero 11/01/19 12:21pm Toy Haulers
RE: Overloaded wheel Breakage

I'm not sure what year your truck is, but the newest ones have something like a 12,000 lb. GVWR with rear GAWRs in the ~7,000 lb. range. They certainly are not equipped with wheels that are rated for only 3,000 pounds. Even my 15 year old Ram 3500 has a rear GAWR high enough that wheels that light would be a no-go.
twodownzero 10/31/19 08:14am Truck Campers
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