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 > Your search for posts made by 'willald' found 68 matches.

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RE: Gasser guys and gals ...why not a diesel ?

For us, it boils down to several things, most of which have already been stated: 1. Don't like the smell of diesel 2. Don't want the extra expense, both up front and ongoing 3. Don't like the typical diesel floorplans, with main door in front of front seat (makes RV feel like a school bus). 4. Feel more comfortable, familiar maintaining a gas engine than a diesel 5. Prefer engine up front, not underneath rear bedroom like it is with so many diesels 6. Don't want something so massive like many diesels are - 40' is way too long, prefer more like 32' or so (and almost no diesels are built that small) 7. Don't like how the diesel drives (yes I've driven both). For some specifics around the last one (how a diesel drives vs gas), as I know some won't agree: A few years ago I test drove a brand new, very powerful diesel pusher RV (had 8.3L Cummins diesel, 380 HP and around 1000 ft-lb of torque as I recall - no slouch). Was considering trading up to such. I remember walking away afterward totally disappointed with how it drove, and seriously wondering why anyone would pay soooo much more $$ for a diesel. I just couldn't see it. Yes, air suspension and engine in back make it a quieter and smoother ride. However, I found that if you step on the accelerator on a diesel, it lugs, gurgles, and sloooowly gets up to speed. You do the same on a gasser, it drops down a gear, turns a few more RPMs, and it gets going, quickly. It just seemed the diesel had very little throttle response, and was very anemic compared to the gasser V10 I had at the time (and that was compared to a stout, very powerful diesel). I much prefer the throttle response a gas engine has, even if that means its a little louder up front. When Ford came out a year or two ago with the new F53 chassis with improved handling, and the big 7.3 V8 with even more 'throat' and throttle response...It became even more of a no-brainer decision for us. Ford really narrowed the gap even more with diesel pusher based RVs, when they came out with the new F53. All that said.....I hope the original poster's intention for this was to truly understand this matter, and not to just stir up yet another 100+ page debate on this subject.
willald 10/20/21 09:32am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

The owners manual for our 1990 Bounder had instructions for building the three level ramps discussed earlier in this post. They worked well for me. There was a little problem, however, they were darn heavy.... Yes, they can be heavy. My thoughts on that, though, is it makes for good, forced exercise. My fat butt needs the exercise, haha. When the kids come with us, I just have them lug those large blocks of wood. The exercise sure won't hurt them, either. :) That said, all the examples here deal with FRONT of the RV being low. The manuals for the Bounder and the Winnie note that when leveling when the rear is low, that blocks must go under all the rear tires not just one on each side. I've wondered about that, too, and seem to recall some discussions some time ago about whether or not both dually tires (inner and outer) need to be supported. What I've found (through many discussions, and many years experience doing it this way) is that NO, you do not need to support both the inner and outer dually tire when pulling the back end up on blocks. The outers are enough. That is, as long as you deploy your jacks as well. Main reason being, the rear jacks will be supporting a good bit of the weight. Especially since you would typically raise it a good bit more with the jacks even after putting back end on blocks, if you are that far off level. The tires will not have the entire weight of the back end on them. The jacks will be shouldering a good bit. You are mainly using the blocks under the outer tires to provide more lateral stability. One tire on each side gives you that in the back, just like it will in the front. Now, you *DO* need to get the entire (outer) tire tread supported/covered on the block, you don't want even a little bit hanging off the edge of the block. That can cause some premature tire failure. That is true for both the rear outer tire as well as the front tire, if you're raising the front. While it wouldn't be a bad idea to support both the inner and outer dually and would make things even more solid.....Not sure it'd be worth it to lug that many heavy pieces of wood around.
willald 10/13/21 03:16pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 2015 Ford Focus flat tow damage

A Jeep Wrangler or a base model 1/2 ton 4X4 will be under 5k lbs. Right, but as I said in my post, 'unless you want a small SUV or pickup...'. Everything you mention here is just that, either a SUV or pickup.
willald 10/13/21 08:04am Dinghy Towing
RE: HOW did you choose your Class A ? ....

This is our 2nd Class A, and 5th RV overall. For us this time, it came down to a couple things: 1. Quality - I've spent enough time fixing shoddy construction and poor materials on our last RV, this time we decided to spend the extra $$ to get a quality built unit and hopefully avoid some of that. Newmar was about the best quality we could find anywhere without spending tons more on a diesel pusher (and we want nothing to do with diesel). 2. Floorplan - We have learned over the years camping, a couple things we really wanted in a floorplan that hadn't had before - dinette on camping side, bed facing toward camping side with plenty of windows for ventilation, residential refrigerator, larger shower, fantastic fans for ventilation. The Newmar 3014 unit seemed to fit all that better than any we looked at, and in a smaller size like we wanted (see below). 3. Size - We wanted something fairly smaller this time,32' or less. Kids no longer camp with us so we don't need bunks or so much space anymore, and we wanted to be able to get into more remote, rustic sites. Also, we do a good bit of 'boondocking', and a smaller unit makes it easier to do that. As to what I'd do different: Honestly, can't really think of anything. We took our time with this one, did our homework, and got just exactly what we wanted, needed. ...As you're probably going to see from the responses on this, everybody's needs, wants are different, and there is no one size fits all when it comes to RVs.
willald 10/13/21 07:52am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

The blocks I built where for Dad's trailer. He had made some (I re-used the boards) He had laid out the holes, drove inch long screws drove halfway in and then holes for the heads to fit in. They bothered me because I know boards split, and wood screws, with their points, can flatten a tire. The carriage bolts, if split out of wood will have a round head on 1 end, and a nut on the other. If it does go thru a tire, tire is ruined, but the ends are large enough not likely to stick in tread. Yes, I know all too well how boards can split, and how the sharp pointy side of a wood screw could flatten a tire. I thought about that a lot, when I was figuring out how to build these boards/ramps several years ago. That was why I made sure all wood screws holding it together have pretty large, flat heads, and are pointing DOWN. Also, they are all located near the outside edges of the boards. This way, even if a board cracks, its very, very unlikely a screw would find its way into a tire. Been using these boards for several years with two different Motorhomes now, never had a problem yet. Welll, except for the groaning and complaining I get from teenage kids whenever I ask them to help me get them out, and put them away when we leave. :) .... Another idea would be sandwich rubber belt (Mud flap?) between the bottom 2 layers, with a tongue sticking out long enough to be under the tire before it hits the ramp. This would make sure they did not slide as you pull on. Hey, I like that idea! Sometimes I do have a problem with the board sliding out when driving up onto it. Rubber flap sandwiched in like you describe here would definitely fix that problem. Just might have to look into doing that.
willald 10/13/21 07:17am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

This guy seemed to have no problem for past two days where Im at. This particular spot was the worst in the entire park. All kinds of roots busting up the asphalt. Camp host said it is only used when someone is desperate and all slots are taken. I wasnt here when he was leveling but my wife and our friends cringed as he was trying to get things level. At one point they swore it was going to tip over Mike https://i.imgur.com/Fj26mr6l.jpg Wow. I bet it felt like walking on a swinging bridge inside that Motorhome, with one end raised that high on just jacks. Looks like a real good way to bend a jack and have a very inconvenient and expensive repair bill. I would've just drove the front end up onto the third level of the wood blocks I've built for this that was just discussing. If that wasn't enough, in some extreme cases I've been known to also whip out the portable shovel, and dig a hole for the tires on the high side, and drive them into it.
willald 10/13/21 07:04am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

Go to a lumber store, buy you a 2x12 or two, and cut it up into a bunch of squares. Throw a bunch of them in your outside storage. I'm not real smart. Instead of cutting squares, would it be better to cut different lengths so you can stack short on long, drive up a ramp? Good point. I should have been more specific about how I cut up the boards. I actually bolted a total of 3 pieces of 2x12 together, stacked 3 high. Top piece is about 12” long, 2nd piece is about 24” long, and bottom piece is about 3’ long. Provides stair steps to drive up, basically - 3 different steps/levels I can drive the wheels up on, depending on how far off level. I built two of them, carry those as well as a handful of square pieces for the jacks. I cut some 2X8s with 6 inches different lengths. Then drilled pilot holes thru the stack for alinement. Used 7/8 paddle bit top of half the holes, and 3/8 thru the others. I put carriage bolts thru with nuts and washers. Decide how tall stack, the nuts drop in the large holes to keep boards in line. Now plastic blocks use similar idea. But I have never seen plastic long enough for a tandem. Yeah, I quit using the plastic blocks when we got the motorhome. Those plastic one work OK for towable RVs, but don’t trust them to handle the weight of a class A. Good idea on the carriage bolts. I just screwed all 3 on mine together somewhat permanent, with long wood screws.
willald 10/12/21 06:40pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

Go to a lumber store, buy you a 2x12 or two, and cut it up into a bunch of squares. Throw a bunch of them in your outside storage. I'm not real smart. Instead of cutting squares, would it be better to cut different lengths so you can stack short on long, drive up a ramp? Good point. I should have been more specific about how I cut up the boards. I actually bolted a total of 3 pieces of 2x12 together, stacked 3 high. Top piece is about 12” long, 2nd piece is about 24” long, and bottom piece is about 3’ long. Provides stair steps to drive up, basically - 3 different steps/levels I can drive the wheels up on, depending on how far off level. I built two of them, carry those as well as a handful of square pieces for the jacks.
willald 10/12/21 04:14pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Non-level campsites Class A

Go to a lumber store, buy you a 2x12 or two, and cut it up into a bunch of squares. Throw a bunch of them in your outside storage. When you first get to a site, check how level you are before turning on the hydraulic jacks. If you are way off level, set some blocks up and drive whichever side is lowest onto some blocks. Get it as close to level as you can with blocks, first. Use rest of the blocks under the jacks to limit how far they have to extend. I don’t like to ever lift any wheel off the ground, front or back. Can put too much lateral stress on jacks, and makes the RV more shaky inside. Tires (all of them) being on the ground (or on blocks) gives you more lateral stability. Oh, and expect that every so often, your blocks will crack and become firewood. That’s why you cut up several blocks, so you have some spares when that happens.
willald 10/10/21 05:32pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: 2015 Ford Focus flat tow damage

After reading all the post . It looks like if you have a unibody car you are on your own when you have any base plate installed to it . The only sure way is not to tow a unibody unless you you know the stresses points on your car . A full frame car would be the best way to go . How many cars are still made that way, with a full frame, flat towable, and fit within the 5k towing limit many have? Unless you want a small SUV or pickup, I’m thinking, none.
willald 10/09/21 01:23pm Dinghy Towing
RE: 2015 Ford Focus flat tow damage

M still thinking this is from operator error. There are hundreds of people towing a Focus with no issues. I asked before but no answer. Are you making sure the steering wheel is unlocked? Yes, he did answer this, in the very next post after you asked such. He stated, the steering is unlocked, and he watched as he went around turns to make sure wheels were turning. Does seem odd that he experienced such a horrible failure here, yet nobody else towing Focuses had this problem. Makes me think, like I said before, this was more of issues with this one particular Focus when it was built, and not indicative of a problem all Focuses necessarily have or will have.
willald 09/28/21 01:58pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Charging a towed vehicle's battery

It is true that the MH will have an 'always hot' pin in the back, usually part of the 7 pin connector back there. HOWEVER, as someone previously stated, do NOT assume that said pin is indeed hot. Check it with your voltmeter! On Ford's F53 chassis, they do NOT wire that pin to 12V power from the factory. Neither do most RV manufacturers. We learned this with our Newmar we just bought a few months ago. On ours, Newmar *did* run the wire from up under the dashboard, right out to the 7 pin connector at the back; They just didn't connect it at either end. I had to do that, before the charge wire would work. Sooo, whether you use a simple charge wire or some kind of charger...Don't assume the wire thats supposed to be always hot, is. Check it with the voltmeter first.
willald 09/28/21 01:42pm Dinghy Towing
RE: Spouse left behind after death at a Campsite, what to do?

As one that lived through (survived) two wives passing away already (and I'm only 52)..... I've dealt with a lot of the brutal emotions, heartache, and chaos of losing someone close to you. And, all the difficult things you have to do as the surviving spouse afterward. When it feels like your life is shattered to pieces and you are stuck in neutral while everyone else is moving on around you like nothing happened. Been there, hope I never have to go through that again. Granted, I never had it happen while camping, that would be a whole nother story. Cheryl (wife) pretty well knows how everything works with our Class A, and is fine with driving it (and she does quite a bit). She wanted to learn, know from day 1 how it all worked when we first got married 2 years ago. I have complete confidence that she could easily break camp completely and get the rig home, if something was to happen to me. She might need a little help here and there, but she would handle it. But, man, oh man, I don't want to even think about her having to go through that. I've told her many times how brutal losing someone that close to you is, I don't wish that on my worst enemy. I never, ever want her to have to go through that. We gonna have to leave this world together at the same time, or she gonna have to go first.
willald 09/20/21 09:46am General RVing Issues
RE: Onan’s New Inverter Based Generators - Mike Mas

Hmmm, interesting discussion. Not going to get into the debate of just how long Onan has had inverter style diesel generators. I'll just say this: When Onan comes out with a fuel injected, inverter version of their 5500 watt gas generator used in many gas class A motorhomes.....THAT, would be a huge, very welcome improvement. I could be tempted to do a genny upgrade for something like that, one day.
willald 09/20/21 09:16am Class A Motorhomes
RE: “Pathetic quality”: RV dealers are fed up...

Quality and inexpensive do not fit in the same sentence - ever. We can sometimes choose one or the other, but not both....... Personally, I'd rather cry about price, buy a product once, and have it last more than two days beyond warranty. This is exactly right, and is the reason why last month when we finally decided to downsize to a somewhat smaller RV, we went with a Newmar coach (see signature, although haven't updated the picture yet). I was tired of making repairs and finding cheap and shoddy construction on the last rig we owned. Decided this time, we'd pony up a few more $$ and get one known for better quality. So far, we've found it is just that. Hmmmmmm...."Downsizing" - you went from (?......?) to a 30' Newmar with a sticker price of $156K. Not picking on you, but some folks just might consider that serious "up-sizing" & "out of their league" from what *they* have now! :W Downsizing, in the sense that we went from a 36’ bunkhouse coach to a 31’ unit that’s designed more for just 2, since kids outgrew the bunks and don’t camp with us anymore. You right, though, was not a down size in terms of $$$ at all, haha.
willald 09/15/21 09:36pm General RVing Issues
RE: 2015 Ford Focus flat tow damage

...... This car was a lemon from day one Ford had it in the shop 4 times for transmission and module problem transmission and module problems? Any chance one of those times when Ford was doing transmission work on it, they did something wrong that put some stress on those frame pieces that led to this happening? Just a guess. Or if it was a lemon with lots of issues from day one, that would suggest maybe this was a manufacturing defect of some kind from the beginning on this one particular vehicle, and you were just the unlucky one that got the one that had this defect, among others. Seems hard to believe this is a design defect with the frame on *all* Ford Focuses, or we'd be seeing about a lot more of these failures. I've flat towed Ford sedans similar to this for 8 years (a Ford Fusion Hybrid for 5 years, and a Ford Taurus for last 3 years) for many, many miles. Have not had any issues with either of them. ...Bottom line if you are going to flat tow make sure it is a full frame or Unibody that is all one piece with no stops and stay away from Ford. Totally understand your concern with what you went through, and why you personally would never want to buy a Ford again (I probably wouldn't, either). And, I agree that full frame or unibody wiht all one piece around the front would be a safer bet. However, its probably painting with an awfully wide brush to suggest staying away from Ford entirely.
willald 09/15/21 03:03pm Dinghy Towing
RE: “Pathetic quality”: RV dealers are fed up...

Quality and inexpensive do not fit in the same sentence - ever. We can sometimes choose one or the other, but not both....... Personally, I'd rather cry about price, buy a product once, and have it last more than two days beyond warranty. This is exactly right, and is the reason why last month when we finally decided to downsize to a somewhat smaller RV, we went with a Newmar coach (see signature, although haven't updated the picture yet). I was tired of making repairs and finding cheap and shoddy construction on the last rig we owned. Decided this time, we'd pony up a few more $$ and get one known for better quality. So far, we've found it is just that.
willald 09/15/21 02:35pm General RVing Issues
RE: Motor coach with bunks recommendations for family

Let me first state that we have owned a 2013 Open Road 36LA and now a 2019 RED 37BA. Both have their advantages and IMO which is best is up to how you use it. The Open Road, with the V10 is a beast and gets 7 mpg. Great for the lower cost. The RED is a 360 so it gets up the mountain but some down to 50mph. It gets about 9 mpg. We went to the RED, as it is our retirement rig. We believe we should have gone to it earlier. Reason is, we will be traveling more and wanted the quieter front end. It is a much smoother ride and handles curves and corners better. It has air ride.... I won't argue that the diesel definitely has its advantages, not the least of which is how quiet it is being in the back. However, things changed a bit when Ford came out with the new F53 chassis and 7.3L big block V8 a year or so ago. Before plunking down the $100k or more extra it costs for a diesel pusher.....One really owes it to themselves to test drive a gasser motorhome built on the newer F53 chassis with the 7.3 gas big block V8 and improved suspension setup. It is a significant improvement over the old V10 chassis, and definitely closed the gap some with the diesel pushers. Engine is quieter, and body roll is noticeably less. Having owned, driven a Georgetown built on a 2012 F53 V10 chassis for 9 years, and now own a 2021 Newmar built on the new F53 chassis....I'm here to tell you there is a huge difference, and Ford has come a long way.
willald 09/09/21 09:20am Class A Motorhomes
RE: Got the MH weighed.

I can tell you from firsthand experience here recently, that you would be surprised at all the 'stuff' you accumulate over time in an RV, and how the weight of all of it can add up. We just traded our Georgetown bunkhouse model in about a month ago for a smaller (but much nicer) unit, a Newmar 3014 (see signature). As part of that, we unloaded everything from the Georgetown, went through it all, and decided what to keep, put in the new Motorhome, and what to take out. It took several weeks, as this resulted in some extensive 'de-cluttering'. Let me tell you, there was soooooo much stuff in that Georgetown that I had forgotten was there, that we did not need! I would guess we 'shed' a good 1,000 pounds worth of stuff that we are no longer carrying in the new unit. It truly felt like moving/downsizing to a smaller house, haha. I weighed the Georgetown many years ago shortly after we bought it in 2012, and remember being well below the limits, then. I'm sure over the years that changed. I have not weighed the Newmar, yet, but I will soon, and will see where we are. Anyway, good job on getting it weighed, even though what you found probably wasn't what you wanted to hear. As far as ways to slim down: Unless you boondock for several days at a time, you can probably get by with a lot less water in your fresh water tank. That alone can shave off several hundred pounds That, and just go through all the various storage compartments, drawers, etc. and decide if you really, really need all that is in there. We found there is a lot we did not need. Do you *really* need enough plates, silverware, etc. to feed 8 or 10 people at a time? Do you really need the accumulation of 10 blankets and sets of sheets? You may well find like we did, that a lot of the stuff you have in there really doesn't need to be there. .
willald 09/07/21 02:17pm Class A Motorhomes
RE: Motor coach with bunks recommendations for family

I just traded in a few weeks ago, our 2012 Georgetown 351DS with bunks that was an awesome unit, and served us great for 9 years. Now own a smaller Newmar (see signature), as kids no longer camp with us, and could no longer fit in the bunks, anyway. I would agree with the previous comments about avoiding units like the ACE that have questionable build quality. One thing I learned over the years with the Georgetown is that you really, really do get what you pay for when it comes to RVs. There's a lot of units out there that ain't built too well. If you can afford a unit like a Tiffin or Winnie (or even Newmar) that is known for better quality, you really should go that route. And, yes, there are LOTs of Class A options out there with bunkhouse floorplans. Especially ones built in last 10 or 12 years.
willald 09/02/21 10:16am Class A Motorhomes
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