RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Tow Vehicles: Diesel vs gas......................

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Diesel vs gas......................

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Page  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 468  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
Copperhead

Central Iowa

Full Member

Joined: 12/15/2017

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/27/18 12:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

larry barnhart wrote:

If I was not going to tow I would have a gas engine so our reasons for having a diesel is the right choice.

chevman


Well, it depends on what, where, etc one is towing. If one has a 5000 lb single axle TT, a gasser would work fine, even at high altitudes. And would be far cheaper to purchase and operate. Only when talking about some major towing does diesel really have the edge.

Not everyone pulls around a 14K 5th wheel. That vast majority of TT's being pulled around are under 7000 lb. My 3/4 ton gasser wouldn't even break a sweat pulling stuff like that around.

If I were regularly towing, say as one of the transport situations yanking trailers from the factory to dealers, then I would jump on a diesel in a heartbeat. That is where it comes into its own. For the average weekender and such, it may or may not be the best choice.

The beauty is, we don't all have to use the same thing to get the job done that we need done. All one really needs to do is crunch the numbers and see what works best for their situation.

Cummins12V98

on the road

Senior Member

Joined: 06/03/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/27/18 12:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Larry has a HEAVY combo and does require a Diesel truck!!!


2015 RAM LongHorn 3500 Dually CrewCab 4X4 CUMMINS/AISIN RearAir 385HP/865TQ 4:10's
37,800# GCVWR "Towing Beast"

"HeavyWeight" B&W RVK3600

2016 MobileSuites 39TKSB3 highly "Elited" In the stable

2007.5 Mobile Suites 36 SB3 29,000# Combined SOLD

Bedlam

PNW

Senior Member

Joined: 06/13/2012

View Profile






Posted: 11/27/18 01:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The 2012 NPR article does not go into RIN and other programs that are still subsidizing Ethanol - There is not just one subsidy funding this fuel, but many. As some expire, others have taken their place.

Does that 2002 study of corn based ethanol still apply today? The soybean farmers have vested interest in their crop, but claim much less corn efficiency than what that study produced.

The report from 10 years ago about water usage may not be valid today considering the changing weather patterns.

My point about those links is that you cannot cherry-pick 16 or 10 or 8 years back to reflect what is happening now. Here are some links produced this year:

https://gro-intelligence.com/insights/wh........ew-us-subsidies-mean-for-soybean-farmers

https://www.thegazette.com/subject/news/........owa-soybean-farmers-federal-aid-20180827

http://www.ethanolproducer.com/articles/........-renewables-down-as-tax-credits-diminish

https://fee.org/articles/ethanol-is-a-ne........cers-but-what-about-the-rest-of-america/

https://www.thoughtco.com/understanding-the-ethanol-subsidy-3321701

https://www.forbes.com/sites/rrapier/201........rom-senator-grassleys-ethanol-editorial/

https://www.taxpayer.net/energy-natural-........sidies-corn-ethanol-corn-based-biofuels/


Chevy Sonic 1.8-Honda Passport C70B-Host Mammoth 11.5-Interstate Car Carrier 20-Joyner SandViper 250-Kawasaki Concours ZG1000-Paros 8' flatbed-Pelican Decker DLX 8.75-Ram 5500 HD-Tank Urban Touring 150SE-VW TransBuggy 1200


Copperhead

Central Iowa

Full Member

Joined: 12/15/2017

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 11/30/18 09:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So many misapplication of those articles you posted along with misconceptions.

Soy beans are not involved in ethanol production. That knocked out a few of those article links you posted. Soy is used for bodiesel, as is peanut oil, canola oil, etc. I never argued that there weren't subsidies for wind energy, biodiesel, etc. Only ethanol. And that there are no more direct subsidies for ethanol production is fact.

The old argument about corn being diverted from food for fuel is a total red herring at best, and an outright lie at worse. Of the entire annual corn crop in the U.S. 20% goes for food.. Of the 80% that remains, 40% of that goes to ethanol production. And of that corn that goes into ethanol production, 17-18 lb of high protein feed supplement comes out the back end for every bushel of corn that goes in the front door. Along with polymers and plastics. Even the insulators used on the spark plugs in gasoline engines is made from byproducts of corn ethanol production.

And if having corn being diverted to ethanol production was a problem, then corn prices would be in the stratosphere. But in fact, corn prices (inflation adjusted) are cheaper than they were in 1996. There is an overabundance of corn. No one is getting short changed on their corn bread, corn flakes, or tortillas. If the corn price would have kept up with inflation, it would be trading for $6.48 a bushel. The closing price for corn 11/30/2018 was $3.66. In April 1996, corn was trading for $4.02. So this trading food for fuel argument is pure poppycock. Economics is not that hard of a subject to understand.

the only Ethanol "subsidy" is for blender fuel pumps. that is a retail thing. Ethanol producers nor farmers sell ethanol at the retail level. Even the article from thoughtco you linked to did not even mention a subsidy. It mentioned tax breaks. Tax breaks are not subsidies. Do you get a subsidy from the government when you claim mortgage interest deduction? Does a person get a subsidy when they claim medical expense as a deduction? Of course not. They just get hit for less tax taken from them. That is all that is going on with any tax advantages the ethanol folks might get. Only those who think that everything belongs to the people of the country would think that letting either individuals or entities keep more of what they earn is a subsidy. Socialism comrade.

While one can argue a little that the Renewable Fuels Standards is some form of subsidy, there is a myriad of things that we deal with daily that can be argued the same way. Government mandates a lot of stuff in our lives that we have to pay for. Most people don't really sit back and look at how much of their money is spent on things that are mandated by government. Ethanol barely scratches the surface. If one really looks closely, most folks spend more on taxes and fees that were established to pay for the Spanish American War and WW I that are still in place than they spend on some "forced" purchasing of ethanol.

Even the article from the taxpayers for common sense, buried deep in the article, subsidies are for blender pumps and such. Again, that is not ethanol producers or farmers that get that. It is retailers who sell fuels. And in some instances it is a good thing. It allows consumers a wide selection of fuels at the same pump and they can choose what they want to buy. I frequent blender pumps exclusively. I put E85 in my vehicle, I buy ethanol free gas for my OPE, lawnmowers, and motorcycle. I get to pick and choose what I want. How is a subsidy for blender pumps such a terrible thing for the consumer?

And indeed, there is taxpayer money spent on crop insurance type of stuff. But that equates to all crops. Including the lettuce in your salad to the green beans on your plate. Crop insurance keeps the entire agriculture system stable to the benefit of all of us. A major drought or similar could wipe out many farmers of all sorts of crops. Then the food supply is negatively affected for years and years. And you think you pay higher prices now? If 20% of America's farmers were to go under in a bad year, you would be paying 5 times or more just for a loaf of bread. And the restaurant industry would probably take a major hit and put thousands of people out of work, because no one could afford the food prices and quit eating out. Livestock and poultry producers could not afford to feed their critters and be forced to sell out. Because of the crop insurance program, the agriculture sector remans relatively stable and we in America spend the lowest percentage of our income on food than anywhere else in the world.

* This post was edited 11/30/18 10:21pm by Copperhead *

Copperhead

Central Iowa

Full Member

Joined: 12/15/2017

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 05:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Larry has a HEAVY combo and does require a Diesel truck!!!


Any heavier that the following?

I live rural and there is 2 miles of hilly gravel / dirt road from my house to the nearest hard top road. We had that hard cold snap and snow last week, then everything warmed up to the high 40's over the weekend, turning the gravel road into a soupy, muddy mess.

I had my semi tractor at home to do some work on it. But I needed to get a load of Kawasaki Mules to Chicago by Monday Morn. Trailer was in town, but had to get the semi tractor to town to get it. Barely got out of the drive and the 11,000 lb steer axle just cut trenches in the road and bogged the whole truck down. Couldn't make any progress even with both lockers engaged on the two drive axles.

Had the wife bring out 2015 Chevy 2500 6.0L gasser out and hook up. Hooked up a heavy duty tow strap to a clevis hitch in the receiver and then to the tow bar on the semi tractor. My wife then drove the 2500 and pulled the semi truck with me in it over 7 short but steep very muddy hills to the highway.

21,000 lb of semi tractor, pulled thru the mud, over 7 hills and the pickup barely broke a sweat. Running on $1.12 a gallon E85 fuel. The poor little 6.0L 360 hp / 380 lb torque V8. While the pickup did a great job, the wife was the bright light. She had never done anything like that before and was almost a nervous wreck at the end of it. But she did a great job, as good or better than anyone else I had seen try this before. A true towing champion!

So, it is a tough sell to convince me that at least within the capability of the gasser pickup, that a diesel and all the associated issues with diesel is required. Might be nicer and offer some bragging rights to friends and massage an ego, but not necessarily "required". "required" is a much overused term today.

Cummins12V98

on the road

Senior Member

Joined: 06/03/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 07:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I guarantee my wife's 99 Tahoe with a 350 in 4wd would do the same. BUT how long would it do it before there is a failure???

Nice story tho.

larry barnhart

wenatchee. wa usa

Senior Member

Joined: 03/30/2001

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 09:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I guess the real deal is to have a fifth with a nice gas engine to help with the towing or maybe an electric motor hooked to the axles with a belt drive.

Of course this is a joke.

chevman


chevman
2001 35 ft avalon alpenlite RK
2005 3500 2wd duramax CC dually
prodigy
easyrider/reese airhitch
trailair center point suspension
JT Strong Arm Stabilizers
KSH 55 inbed fuel tank

scanguage II
TD-EOC
Induction Overhaul Kit
TST tire monitors
FMCA # F479110


gsxr1300

ma

Full Member

Joined: 08/10/2010

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 09:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cant wait to see what the 2020 7.3 ford gaser does!


2011 Ford F250 Lariat 6.7 4x4 LB
2010 Crossroads Sunset Trail 29QB
2001 Suzuki Hayabusa 1300 Turbo Charged 300+RWHP

mountainkowboy

Socal > NE Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 09/20/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 01:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gsxr1300 wrote:

Cant wait to see what the 2020 7.3 ford gaser does!


Could be a game changer....wait till it's offered in the Moho chassis.


Chuck & Ruth with 4-legged Molly
1990 F350 S/C Lariat Dually (Red)
1990 S&S 11SC Cabover
2011 Ford Ranger
1987 HD FLHTP


carl2591

Garner NC

Senior Member

Joined: 11/22/2012

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/05/19 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

that is great.. sounds like the making of a commercial.. like the one toyota did when the new 5.7L tundra come out was was shown pulling a space shuttle with no apparent help.. this was only possible on smooth level paved surface but the truck did the job..

Now how long or far can this happen. the trip was 1/4 mile but it could have gone for a couple miles more of less.. but that is still impressive for a gasser..

For me, currently ford f-250 '03 7.3L the difference between gas and diesel cost at some .70 to .90 cents is a non starter for me to stay with diesel when we go to change out in 3 yrs. So need to keep up the prices to see how it goes.

From what I can figure when diesel is .25 to .30 cent higher price the difference its mostly a wash between the two. Above that and it starts to get more toward the gasser vs diesel in cost.

SO we will have to see what shakes out in the next couple years to know where to say or go.. diesel or gas.. that is the question??

Copperhead wrote:

Cummins12V98 wrote:

Larry has a HEAVY combo and does require a Diesel truck!!!


Any heavier that the following?

I live rural and there is 2 miles of hilly gravel / dirt road from my house to the nearest hard top road. We had that hard cold snap and snow last week, then everything warmed up to the high 40's over the weekend, turning the gravel road into a soupy, muddy mess.

I had my semi tractor at home to do some work on it. But I needed to get a load of Kawasaki Mules to Chicago by Monday Morn. Trailer was in town, but had to get the semi tractor to town to get it. Barely got out of the drive and the 11,000 lb steer axle just cut trenches in the road and bogged the whole truck down. Couldn't make any progress even with both lockers engaged on the two drive axles.

Had the wife bring out 2015 Chevy 2500 6.0L gasser out and hook up. Hooked up a heavy duty tow strap to a clevis hitch in the receiver and then to the tow bar on the semi tractor. My wife then drove the 2500 and pulled the semi truck with me in it over 7 short but steep very muddy hills to the highway.

21,000 lb of semi tractor, pulled thru the mud, over 7 hills and the pickup barely broke a sweat. Running on $1.12 a gallon E85 fuel. The poor little 6.0L 360 hp / 380 lb torque V8. While the pickup did a great job, the wife was the bright light. She had never done anything like that before and was almost a nervous wreck at the end of it. But she did a great job, as good or better than anyone else I had seen try this before. A true towing champion!

So, it is a tough sell to convince me that at least within the capability of the gasser pickup, that a diesel and all the associated issues with diesel is required. Might be nicer and offer some bragging rights to friends and massage an ego, but not necessarily "required". "required" is a much overused term today.



Carl2591, Raleigh NC
2005 Airstream Classic 31D
2003 Ford F-250 SD, CC, 7.3L modded diesel machine
Every day is a new day with potential to be life changing.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Page  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 468  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Diesel vs gas......................
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS