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Topic: 24' vs 27': Maneuverability

Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 08:59am

I am still obsessing over my first RV purchase, and one major factor is that my DH and I have never owned/driven one before. Is there a major difference in the maneuverability of a 24' vs a 27' (the largest I'm willing to go)? I note, fx, that some campgrounds in Yosemite (one of my favorite places) won't take a MH larger than 24'. And I am worried about going around those tight mountain curves! OTOH, I see where a number of people said that their mistake in buying their first RV was not getting one big enough.

Thanks for any help!

Honeybee


Me and my Hubby (empty-nesters)
Cassie, our Golden Retriever/Collie lap dog
Samantha, a 2002 28' Jayco Eagle Class C



Posted By: Seabeec on 09/09/04 09:10am

We had a 30' Southwind and we stayed @ Yosemite for a week last year. That 24' thing your talking about is wrong. I saw lots of rigs over 30'. We've had two 30' class A motorhomes and currently have a 30' 5er. Don't be afraid of windy mountain roads in anything 30' or less and then I wouldn't worry much in larger rigs either. These MH's are easy to drive and back up. I would go for at least the 27'er. I personally wouldn't go for anything over 30' if you plan on doing a lot of "camping". Full timing you wouldn't nessecarily go to the small parks that you would want to go to if you were just camping so you could get something larger then. 30' is great. You can still drive it into the parking lot at the grocery store and expect to get into and out off the lot. I wish I could say the same for my 5er/truck combo. You'll be just fine. fear not and enjoy.


Posted By: B G on 09/09/04 09:10am

You will find very little difference in driving a 27' compaired to a 24'. Also, I have never been anywhere where they came out and measured my MH. 99.9% of the camp spaces that you can get a 24' into will also handle a 27'.

BG


Posted By: MarleneN on 09/09/04 09:13am

We had a 24 ft before we moved to our 27ft. The reality was our 24 ft was really 26 ft end to end, including cab. The 27 ft is 27'11" end to end. There's only a couple of feet of difference between the two.

We haven't found a major difference in driving, or manuverability between the two.


2005 Jayco Greyhawk, 27DS


Posted By: bigdawgs on 09/09/04 09:14am

Our big mistake was purchasing a 24ft motorhome for our first rv purchase. No room at all with the two of us and two large dogs. We sold it last year and since purchased a 27 Ft light weight fifth wheel with one slide as we tow with a half ton truck. We love the extra space and hope to someday upgrade to a larger fifth wheel and a bigger truck.


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 09:29am

Wow! Thanks for the fast replies. Seems to be unanimous that we should go slightly larger. As I said, this is our first RV, we are brand new empty-nesters, and we will probably be doing mostly weekend jaunts with a couple of longer vacations/year thrown in. The extra 3' seems to be nice in a lot of models because there is often a full bed in the back, not just over the cab. I am hesitant about that over-cab bed (although my DH says it is fine with him.) However it seems a shame to "waste" space on a whole extra bed for just the two of us. So much to think about-- not the least of which IS getting in and out of convenience-store lots, as someone mentioned.

(BTW, what I read about the 24' at Yosemite was on the Yosemite camping site, I think. There were definitely other campgrounds where a longer MH was fine, but several supposedly had 24' length restrictions.)

Thanks so much for the feedback!

Honeybee


Posted By: Bordercollie on 09/09/04 10:13am

Motorhomes are always a compromise. I can't take our 27 foot Tioga 26Q to some places around town where I could just barely fit our old 23 footer. Having a rear queen bed and cavernous rear storage is more important to us than loss of some non-camping utility. We are a retired couple with two border collies that recently spent 30 days on a cross-country tour in good comfort. We would have been cramped in a 24 footer. We are getting too arthritic for crawling up to and down form the overhead bed and the queen bed is great naps or just lounging. BTW, make sure that the dinette or sofa cushions are comfortable and that seating facilitates both of you watching TV, etc.


Posted By: Westronics on 09/09/04 10:19am

If you are choosing whether or not to have a bed on floor level (rather than just overhead) consider the following:

With a bed, you don't have to climb up over the cab every night. You'll likely still have to climb over each other (if it's a corner bed), and that's actually easier in the overhead bed in some rigs because it's 8' long, total.

Without a bed the floor plan can be quite a bit more open. Often they have a rear corner kitchen with more kitchen counter space.

Obviously, a few feet can make a difference sometime in maneuverability and parking. It usually won't matter, but it might sometimes.

We considered the same thing and having the smaller rig with much more room in the floor plan won out for us.

It can also be kept neater-looking wihout even making the bed by just pulling the curtain closed to hide the overhead bed. Not a big deal, of course.

EDIT: I almost forgot, you might want to consider a used rig. You can even get one under warranty if it's less than two years old and is a Jayco (for a $100 warranty transfer fee). You'll save some money, but selection would be catch as catch can. We went that route and got lucky, finding the model we wanted that was only 1-1/2 years after the intial purchase.

* This post was edited 09/09/04 10:35am by Westronics *


2002 Jayco Greyhawk 24SS, Camera, ScanGauge, Inverter, Airtabs, Portabote, SeeLevel II, Tireman valves, Xatnrex Battery Monitor, Aero-flo vent, Trik-L-Start, XPS Rib, Chains, Lil' Stanker, Be kind to septic systems Ford: 1-800-444-3311. RV Tires



Posted By: Boating Woody on 09/09/04 10:44am

I used to drive my inlaw's 24' and owned 27' and 28' Class C's. I have test driven some others. I haven't noticed much difference between any of them to tell the truth, but I am comfortable driving big vehicles. Height might be a bigger issue than length up to 30+ feet in length, especially in smaller parking lots with overhangs and signage. My wife drives/backs/parks ours comfortably. (Fresnel lenses, handheld radios, and a back-up camera are indispensable in these situations. We will also get out and walk around and help spot trouble if we think it is an issue.)

If it looks tight, we take a close look at what parking lot is nearby. Remember, if in doubt, go slow or don't go. I always park to the side or in back where there is more space. If there is a larger lot adjacent to it, I will likely park there instead just to make life easier.

I think the difference in length will be most obvious when you are inside and need some extra space, get tired of climbing over each other, or someone is a little tired and needs to nap away from the TV and noise up front. There is always the weight restriction for cab-over (and some dinette sleepers) beds that some of us run into. (Not to mention the low ceiling in some units. My Jayco being one of the few exceptions)

When I was shopping the last couple of years, I noticed very little difference in inital cost, mileage, or maintenance, but heard a lot from dealers about poor resale on smaller units at trade-in time. Since I always just sell mine, I do not know if this is true or not.

Good luck.


Posted By: Bubby's RV on 09/09/04 04:35pm

We have a 24' with the rear corner bed. It isn't really easy to make up, but it is comfortable now that we added a memory foam topper on it. I'm 6 ft and if you're taller, the corner bed would be too short.

We went for this size (from a 21' rig) because a) it's the largest size that will fit at home, and b) it's easy to find a place to park. We bring our two dogs (20 lb & 40 lb) and when we go somewhere they need to come too. So we drive our rig to shop, to eat out, to sightsee and anywhere else and parking is important to us.

We wouldn't want to fulltime in a rig this size, but for weekends, long weekends and a week, it can carry everything we need.


John, Winnebago Minnie 24V



Posted By: 1rickw on 09/09/04 05:27pm

I was seriously considering a 24 but then decided on a 26. Sure glad I didn't get the 24. Wish now I had gone to a 31 or 33 ft Class A.

Driving the 26 food is not very difficult. I have gotten into some tight spots with it. Just make sure you use a spotter when backing up.


2004 Jamboree 26Q + great wife to travel with ">
2012 Honda Fit towing 4 down with BrakeBuddy


Posted By: Westronics on 09/09/04 05:37pm

[quote...Sounds like you want about the same things we want... thanks for the advice. Now, I don't know how to quote you and change the message topic, but-- how will we know how much weight we can put on each axle? Is that info in the manuals? And what if we get a used MH with no manuals... how would we find out? Honeybee[/quote] How much weight you can add to each axle is not documented [i][b]anywhere[/i][/b]. What [i][b]is[/i][/b] documented is the CCC - you can find that one of three ways: First, check the web site for that manufacturer. Second, If it's not there, ask here for someone with the same model to tell you what's on their sticker. Third, go to dealers or a show and look at the sticker. For issues on front/rear axle weights in particular, you won't know until you weigh. I strongly suggest you add in a clause on your purchase contract having to do with weights. You really want to have about 2,000 (+) CCC available and have about 60% (or so) of that available to the rear axle. The best thing to do is to weight the rig before purchase, being certain to get axle weights to compare to the GAWRs. If you cannot do that before your purchase is final, than you should right in the maximum axle weights you'll accept right into the purchase contract. For a used MH, the GAWRs and GVWR is always on a sticker on the driver's side door jamb. That's truly all you [i]need[/i], because you can figure out the rest by simply weighing the rig. Let me know if you don't understand anything I've written and I'll make it clearer.

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* This post was edited 09/09/04 06:32pm by Westronics *


Posted By: gearjam on 09/09/04 05:50pm

I got rid of a 27ft Pace Arrow and downsized to a 24ft Jamboree.Now I don't have to tow a car and I can get in just about anywhere a pickup truck can.If you back into a parking space you can hang the overhang behind the rear wheels out over the parking block and it's no longer than a van.I must say that we don't live in ours but take three week trips with 2 adults and 2 teenagers.Yes it could be a little bigger but it works well for us.We were in Yosemite this June and saw plenty of big rigs but if you want to explore you better have a car along or a small motorhome.Also it is true that some motorhome lenght is not as advertzed but mine is just about right on when they call it a 24.By something and go because it takes owning about 3 or 4 motorhomes till you figure out what you REALLY want or need.


Posted By: wdhdoc on 09/09/04 11:28am

I totally agree with the posters above that you will notice very little difference in overall handling or maneuverability between a 24ft. vs. 27 ft. class C motorhome; I've had both.


wdhdoc
2005 Jayco Seneca 35 ft. triple slide
6.6 Duramax Diesel, Kodiak 5500 chassis, 22,000 lb. GVWR
2005 Jeep Wrangler Sport Toad
Roadmaster Sterling tow bar, Brake Buddy


Posted By: MarleneN on 09/09/04 01:03pm

Our first one was a 24ft as I said, and we knew within two weeks we'd make a huge mistake. Those corner beds are not really comfortable!

The thing I like about the cab bed is that when we are travelling just the two of us, it's a great place to put things up and out of the way during your stay (quite often, we'll put our golf clubs up there. They go under the dinette when travelling.

The entertainment centre in place of the cab bed on the 27 ft and up certainly adds a lot of weight to your unit as a whole.

Good luck!


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 02:22pm

Quote:

We are getting too arthritic for crawling up to and down form the overhead bed and the queen bed is great naps or just lounging. BTW, make sure that the dinette or sofa cushions are comfortable and that seating facilitates both of you watching TV, etc.


You are saying here just what I've been thinking to myself-- great to have a bed down lower for naps (yay naps!!), and when we've rented a beach house, my DH lies on the bed to read. As for comfortable sofa cushions: I must say that in most of the RVs I've seen photos of on eBay (a great place for looking at lots of styles), NONE of those couches looks at ALL comfortable! Are they better than they look? The camper I've liked best so far has a dinette and two captain's chairs instead of the couch; I thought that was a far superior arrangement (of course, that's because we don't need the couch as a bed.)

Speaking of comfort: does anyone ever exchange the mattress for one of those inflatable ones (the kind with the airpump built in)? One of my biggest concerns with the bed is not so much the location, but the comfort. My husband and I both have lousy backs, and I thought maybe an air mattress would be easier to live with.

Thanks for the help (and give those cute border collies a hug from me, I love them!)

Honeybee


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 02:29pm

Quote:

Our first one was a 24ft as I said, and we knew within two weeks we'd make a huge mistake. Those corner beds are not really comfortable!


Now I'm confused. Aren't the corner beds in the 27' unit as opposed to the 24'? I'm assuming with a 24', we'll have the bed over the cab, and more floor space down below.

As for comfort, I'll repeat my question to Bordercollie-- have you ever used an air mattress?

Thanks for the advice!

Honeybee


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 02:36pm

Quote:

EDIT: I almost forgot, you might want to consider a used rig.


We are definitely planning on a used model. Probably an older used model... the price is a lot more reasonable for us, since we are just starting out (we haven't camped in years, so we are really rusty! )

Your points about the floor plan are well-made, and point up the ambivalence I have. My husband is a great cook; we definitely need a little bit more space there. OTOH, I'm afraid that climbing into the bed over the cab might get old pretty quickly. We will definitely look for one which has more headroom there; I hope that helps. But meanwhile, there IS the subject of naps... and for that the bed on the floor is so much more convenient. Decisions, decisions! I do NOT want a huge rig!!

Honeybee


Posted By: Westronics on 09/09/04 02:57pm

Quote:

...We will definitely look for one which has more headroom there; I hope that helps. But meanwhile, there IS the subject of naps... and for that the bed on the floor is so much more convenient. Decisions, decisions! I do NOT want a huge rig!!

Honeybee


We find that it is nearly no effort to get up into the overhead bed. One foot on the dinette seat, on foot on the back support for the seat and up into the bed. The overhead clearance is anough to crawl around up there. We take naps up there all the time.

It's a small hassle to get OUT of the bed, but not bad. We've done this for at least 9 camping trips to date, including one of about two weeks, and find it's no big deal. I suspect this may get old when we are over 60 or 70 years old, but, until then (some years off still), we're fine with it. I think the rig will be paid off before we are 60 years old, so that's about time for a new one anyway, right? [emoticon]

As for head room, that is an issue. I'd like more! Our rig has enough so that we can sit up in a reclining position for reading using pillows (or whatever) for support.

It all depends on what you want most. We wanted a fairly short rig with lots of living space, and so we ended up with a 25' rig with no fixed bed at floor level. You can't really equal the living space we have in anything short of an over-30' rig because of all the space used up by the bed and/or bedroom and hallway.

I don't really know if you can find more headroom than ours in this size rig - which is a real shame. Weight-wise, it would be an issue - this rig is already close to max on the front axle after loading it up for travel. Oddly enough, larger rigs can have less of a weight issue up front because the overhang in the back leverages some weight off the front.

I imagine our retirement rig will be quite a bit larger - a Class A most likely. Who knows - by that time the rigs will look different, no doubt, so we'll just wait and see what develops.


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 03:10pm

[quoteIt all depends on what you want most. We wanted a fairly short rig with lots of living space, and so we ended up with a 25' rig with no fixed bed at floor level. You can't really equal the living space we have in anything short of an over-30' rig because of all the space used up by the bed and/or bedroom and hallway. I don't really know if you can find more headroom than ours in this size rig - which is a real shame. Weight-wise, it would be an issue - this rig is already close to max on the front axle after loading it up for travel. Oddly enough, larger rigs can have less of a weight issue up front because the overhang in the back leverages some weight off the front.[/quote] Sounds like you want about the same things we want... thanks for the advice. Now, I don't know how to quote you and change the message topic, but-- how will we know how much weight we can put on each axle? Is that info in the manuals? And what if we get a used MH with no manuals... how would we find out? Honeybee

Note: Due to invalid formatting, all formatting has been ignored.


Posted By: MarleneN on 09/09/04 03:40pm

Our 24 ft bed had a corner bed. Our 27 ft jayco has a walkaround Queen bed with a mattress to die for. It's extremely comfortable. We both have bad backs too, and we love this mattress.


Posted By: LorneM on 09/09/04 06:19pm

Since no one else has mentioned this I will. I have a Safari Trek with the bed that comes down from the ceiling on an electric motor. This eliminates the bedroom but gives me a queen size bed when sleeping and a larger living room for the shorter RV because there is no bedroom.
I have a 2430 model which is really about 26 1/2 feet long on the outside. My sister has the 2830 model which is really about 28 1/2 feet long.
If doing this again my preference would probably be the 2830 model but both are nice for different reasons.
If you have not looked at a Trek I would do so. You don't have to buy one but it will give you an idea of what having that type of bed will do.
Lorne
00, 2430, Trek, gas


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 07:02pm

Quote:

I got rid of a 27ft Pace Arrow and downsized to a 24ft Jamboree. Now I don't have to tow a car and I can get in just about anywhere a pickup truck can....if you want to explore you better have a car along or a small motorhome.


So does this mean you think you would have had significantly more difficulty exploring in Yosemite with the larger MH? This is my concern-- we will not be towing a car; our MH will be our only vehicle. I don't want to find that we are too big to really enjoy the park once we get there.

Thank you so much for your help!

Honeybee


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/09/04 07:19pm

[quote How much weight you can add to each axle is not documented [i][b]anywhere[/i][/b]. What [i][b]is[/i][/b] documented is the CCC ...Let me know if you don't understand anything I've written and I'll make it clearer.[/quote] You have been so kind and forthcoming with your help that I am totally embarrassed to admit that although I understood your instructions, I am not familiar yet with your abbreviations. What do CCC, GAWR, and GVWR stand for? It's not for nothing that I am spending most of my time in the Beginning RVing forum! But since I know I want a Class C vehicle, I am trying to learn all I can specifically about them. Thank you for your patience! Honeybee

Note: Due to invalid formatting, all formatting has been ignored.


Posted By: Bob91977 on 09/09/04 07:43pm

With no kids I would consider having an entertainment/storage center in place of the cabover bed.

We have a 26.5' and just the two of us plus dog. It is our first motorhome. The size is perfect I guess, nothing to compare it to. But I wouldn't want a shorter one nor a much longer one (up to 30' would be OK). We have never used the cabover bed and probably never will. So we use it for storing soft stuff like blankets, linens, and clothing.

If I had it to do again I would have that area as the entertainment center plus storage cabinets.


Posted By: Westronics on 09/10/04 08:11am

Quote:

Quote:

How much weight you can add to each axle is not documented anywhere. What is documented is the CCC ...Let me know if you don't understand anything I've written and I'll make it clearer.


You have been so kind and forthcoming with your help that I am totally embarrassed to admit that although I understood your instructions, I am not familiar yet with your abbreviations. What do CCC, GAWR, and GVWR stand for?

It's not for nothing that I am spending most of my time in the Beginning RVing forum! But since I know I want a Class C vehicle, I am trying to learn all I can specifically about them.

Thank you for your patience!

Honeybee


Look here: http://www.rv.net/forums/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/CFB/1/Tid/596462.cfm and here: http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/CFB/1/TID/14274798.cfm.

Meantime, here's CCC, GAWR and GVWR, and all terms referred to in their definitions below:

CCC: Cargo Carrying Capacity. Comparable to the previously used NCC, CCC is equal to the GVWR less UVW, the weight of fresh water in the tank and hot water heater, the weight of propane in the tank, and the SCWR.

SCWR: Sleeping Capacity Weight Rating. Calculated by multiplying the number of sleeping positions as defined by the RV manufacturer by 154 pounds per position.

GVWR: Gross Vehicle Weight Rating: The maximum allowed GVW for a vehicle.

GVW: Gross Vehicle Weight - the actual weight of a vehicle.

UVW: Unloaded Vehicle Weight, also know as "Dry Weight". This is the weight with no liquids or options.

GAWR (front or rear): The Gross Axle Weight Rating: The maximum allowed GAW.

GAW (front or rear): The Gross Axle Weight - the amount of weight on that particular axle.

NCC: Net Carrying Capacity. The maximum weight of all occupants, personal belongings, food, fresh water, LP gas, tools, dealer-installed accessories and, for motorhomes, the tongue weight of the towed vehicle that can be carried by this RV. (To calculate the weight of water, multiply number of gallons times 8.33 pounds per gallon.) NCC is equal to or less than GVWR minus UVW. Note that this term is not really used any more.

While we are at it, you could also read: http://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fuseaction/thread/tid/14267506.cfm on how to not get burned by weight issues in a purchase.


Posted By: CurlyDave on 09/12/04 11:14pm

My wife refused to even consider anything longer than 24 feet.

Very fortunately we saw a model designated a 2890 at a show and we liked the floor plan. I stayed completely silent about the fact that the length was really 30' and we got it. It gets smaller every trip. It is still large enough for us, but she agrees that it would not be if it were even 2' smaller.

As far as towing a car goes, leave yourself the option of towing a car, even if you don't plan to right now. While not having a car and driving the MH everywhere seems nice at first, what we learned was that moving the MH takes some preparation and doing this every time you want to go to the store is gets to be a problem.

Every time, before I drive the MH, I do a walk around inspection, check tire pressures, unhook the hookups and stow the hoses and cords. My wife puts away everything we have taken out that will go skittering across the MH when we go around a corner. Then another walk around inspection before moving. This takes 20-30 minutes.


Kathy & Dave - kids: grown and gone - Yellow Labs: Amber & Crystal
2004 SunSeeker 2890 DS - RoadMaster dolly - 2004 Toyota Highlander



Posted By: lepuppeteer on 09/13/04 03:40am

We love our 27'!! I've only had one time when I had trouble maneuvering it out of a gas station and that was because I ended up behind a pickup that turned out to be abanded at the pump. I ended up having to back the MH and my car on the dolly about 15-20 ffeet to get around it, That was quite a memerable experience. Our 27' has twin bedws in the back for the wife and I. Our 3 kids (14, 12, 8) each have their oun bed as well. One over the cab, one in the fold down dinet and the other in his bed I made over the seats in the cab. We love it!!!


Lowell & Lois
Beth(16), Cassie(14), Tim(10)
Dozens of puppets
'88 27' Ford Fleetwood Rallye


Posted By: ct1978barnes on 09/13/04 05:54am

We have a 28 ft Jayco eagle realy 29 ft and love it we had a 24 ft trailer before and the full size bed got smaller and smaller every year. The Jayco has a full queen I am 6'3' and we got a nice new matrest at Camping world . It has springs and it came in a box and we unrolled it its great . We pulled our camper with a conversion for 8 years and the Jayco dosent drive much different than the van you just have to rember the queen size bed is behind you . We love our getting close to empty neasters a Sr at BGSU and a Jr in High school . Its also great to have a back bed room and the kids have the bed over the van and sofa . They have there tv and we have ours not to be overlooked is the privercy . We had none in the 24 ft trailer . And some day grand kids will love the bed over top to .Hope this helps


Charles Barnes


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/13/04 06:40am

Quote:

My wife refused to even consider anything longer than 24 feet....the length was really 30' and we got it. It gets smaller every trip....As far as towing a car goes, leave yourself the option of towing a car, even if you don't plan to right now. While not having a car and driving the MH everywhere seems nice at first, what we learned was that moving the MH takes some preparation and doing this every time you want to go to the store is gets to be a problem.
Quote:



Everything you are saying here makes perfect sense. I think, however, that given the options of towing vs. having to drive the MH everywhere, we are more likely to deal with the inconvenience of the latter. I would never say that the idea of driving a MH everywhere "seems nice"-- it actually seems like a nuisance for just the reasons you stated (plus the added bulk compared to a car). But at this point I don't see us towing. Of course, you are right that we could change our minds later.

What this thread has done for me most of all is give me the options of looking at some slightly longer MH's, knowing that if we get a 26' or 27', we won't be seriously "oversized" for what we want to do.


Posted By: Finally Fulltiming on 09/13/04 11:11am

IMHO, go for the larger unit. As noted above, more space for living, sleeping, storing, etc. and I don’t think you’ll notice the difference in driving. Except for maybe 1 or 2 mpg.

A couple of things for consideration:

1) We particularly like our rear twin bed arrangement – no daily creating beds from dinette, couch or whatever.
2) Overhead cab is great for storage if not needed for sleeping. We use it for microwave, TV, folding chairs, dirty clothes – things we don’t have permanent space for & want readily accessible.
3) Daily moving is not too big a deal if you plan for it and have an appropriate campground site so you don’t need levelers and awning. We just did it for a week and found it very convenient to have our own food, beverages and bathroom readily available. I left water and sewer hoses connected at the CG and just filled and emptied the tanks as necessary while we were there.

Good luck and happy trails.


Posted By: Technicolor Dreamcoat on 09/14/04 12:43am

... lots of good answers here.

We chose a 29+ foot, class C (our first MH) and have had few problems with maneuverability. We pull no toad, and travel everywhere in the MH. We have taken several trips into the Colorado Rockies on winding state highways through narrow canyons and one trip up to and through Yellowstone. Only the first time was difficult, and that was because I was nervous about it. Just take it slow; people expect that of motorhomes in the mountains anyway.

We have not stayed at primitive, length-restricted campsites yet, but I hear that most of the length limitations in National Parks and Forests are tailored to the unskilled driver. A good driver can manuever several more feet of MH into most "restricted" campsites. Unpaved entrance roads are no problem, though "washboard" is very unpleasant in our MH.

The only thing I don't like is the long rear overhang, which I've scraped many times already (so far no harm done). My advice is to check the rear overhang, in particular the "exit angle." A 27 footer would be much better than our 29+, and a 24 probably doesn't have very much of an overhang at all.

That said, I still prefer the 29+ footer and its rear bedroom.

One final note, we use a self-inflating air mattress on our jack-knife sofa, and it works great for our 15-year-old. Air mattresses don't work so well for two people though, you turn carefully or someone gets tossed on the floor.

-TD

* This post was edited 09/14/04 01:13am by Technicolor Dreamcoat *


Technicolor Dreamcoat

2004 Dutchmen 28A 28-foot Class C (former rental)
Thinking of towing a '94 Geo Prizm


Posted By: Bordercollie on 09/14/04 12:25pm

We sleep better on the rig's queen bed mattress than the King mattress in our home bedroom . It is medium firmness. I think it's a Serta. Whatever rig you buy, lay on the bed for a while and make sure it suits you both. I hate the cushions on the dinette, my fanny starts to go numb after 1/2 hour. The upholstery fabric is thin and probably will need replacing in a couple of years with dog traffic etc. We'll look for more comfortable cushion material and covering fabric. BTW, make your that you both can view the TV comfortably in the "living room area" . Our TV cabinet is on the wrong side, they have apparently changed this on this years Tioga 26Q's. Whoops, sorry, repeated myself about TV cabinet placement. BTW, you may want to invest in a Trav Sack or similar two-person sleeping bag setup for your rear bed. See other threads on that subject.

* This post was edited 09/14/04 12:31pm by Bordercollie *


Posted By: jim2e on 09/14/04 06:22pm

We didn't want to pull a bedroom around all day , then not use the living area at night. We liked the Trek's floor plan but not the price.
We settled on our little coach with a big engine. Any C 22-28 foot will drive about the same. Sleeping upstairs is out and the TV is hard to see in the cabinet. So we open the sofa and dinette, put two bridging boards (that fit under the dinette seat cushions) across the 12" gap and bring the overhead mattress down for a queen near the floor. The TV is moved around either on one corner or the other of the overhead or on the table if we are sitting on the sofa.
We have started using a queen AeroBed and leave the matteress at home- lots of storage room overhead. Either way it takes less than 5 minutes to make and un-make the bed . Keep looking and somewhere out there is the coach for you.


2000 22' Minnie Ford 350 V10
2005 Kia Rio Roadmaster Tow package Steer Safe
If the Trip is not as much fun as the Destination,,, you are Driving too FAST



Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/14/04 08:46pm

Quote:

we open the sofa and dinette, put two bridging boards (that fit under the dinette seat cushions) across the 12" gap and bring the overhead mattress down for a queen near the floor...We have started using a queen AeroBed and leave the matteress at home- lots of storage room overhead. Either way it takes less than 5 minutes to make and un-make the bed . Keep looking and somewhere out there is the coach for you.


Oh, I *love* this alternative! It seems that one after another, the members of this forum come up with the greatest ideas. I am just so eager to find "the coach for me".... it is so frustrating. There's a big show in a few weeks; at least we'll sure get to check out a lot of alternatives. Until then, I keep reading, keep dreaming, keep hoping!


Posted By: Westronics on 09/14/04 09:17pm

Quote:

Quote:

we open the sofa and dinette, put two bridging boards (that fit under the dinette seat cushions) across the 12" gap and bring the overhead mattress down for a queen near the floor...We have started using a queen AeroBed and leave the matteress at home- lots of storage room overhead. Either way it takes less than 5 minutes to make and un-make the bed . Keep looking and somewhere out there is the coach for you.


Oh, I *love* this alternative! It seems that one after another, the members of this forum come up with the greatest ideas. I am just so eager to find "the coach for me".... it is so frustrating. There's a big show in a few weeks; at least we'll sure get to check out a lot of alternatives. Until then, I keep reading, keep dreaming, keep hoping!


Note that this cool idea only works without a slide. The gap gets too large with a slide. At least I think that's how it would go.


Posted By: Honeybee8888 on 09/14/04 09:53pm

[quoteNote that this cool idea only works without a slide. The gap gets too large with a slide. At least I think that's how it would go.[/quote] Yup. It only works if the dinette is across from a sofa, too. If there are captain's chairs instead, or chairs opposite a sofa, that's a non-starter, I suspect. I am partial to the chairs, myself-- those sofas mostly look awfully hard and uncomfortable to me!

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Posted By: Kayla on 09/15/04 12:46pm

Hi!

I'm also shopping for a used Class C. And size is very important as I'm wanting to pull my horse trailer (with 2 to 4 horses) with it.

What can be told about engines? What's the gas mileage on a Ford 460 as that seems to be the size of engine in most of the 27 foot or longer MH?

Air ride suspension is another main question and are the brake systems 'built-up' any? That question may not make a lot of sense, but if you pull a car, you might have a clue to what I'm needing to know.

Thanks! And Happy Camping!


Posted By: Westronics on 09/15/04 03:51pm

Quote:

Hi!

I'm also shopping for a used Class C. And size is very important as I'm wanting to pull my horse trailer (with 2 to 4 horses) with it...


Size is NOT the issue for towing your trailer, it's hitch capacity. Assuming an E-450, you have a GVWR of 14,050 and a Ford-listed GCWR of 20,000, leaving you just shy of 6,000 lbs for towing, assuming you are loaded up near GVWR. A rig like mine could have up to 8,000 pounds of towing capacity because it pretty small as E-450 motorhomes go.

Unfortunately, most rigs have a 3,500 pounds hitch, with 5,000-pound hitches pretty generally available for the last couple of model years. It's not going to be easy getting a configuration where you can tow a horse trailer. I would think.

As you can see, any size rig based on the E-450 will have the same towing capacity as you'll be hitch-limited, not weight-limited.

Good luck in your search!


Posted By: Phil Jones on 09/15/04 06:29pm

Westronics.......Do you know the spec for an earlier E350? The only rating I have listed anywhere is 11,000 (GVWR I think. Want to tow a car, need to figure out my limits.
1985 E350, 460 engine, 26 or 28 ft Class C (Jubilee)
Thanks in advance......Phil Jones


Posted By: Randg on 09/15/04 07:28pm

Phil.... I just took this off my 1990 Jamboree D 24. It's on the E350 chassis with the 460 engine. All weights in lbs.
GVWR 11,000, Front 4,200, Rear 7,480, Base Weight 8,708.

Options: Hitch 36, Microwave 40, Roof AC 120, Generator 4.0 kW 265, Fuel 36 gallons @ 6.0 per gal 216.

UVW 9,385, GVWR 11,000, CCC 1615.

Interesting there is no mention of weight of passengers or water like on the current stickers which reduces the CCC from what is shown.

Hope this helps.


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