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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop

 > What to do with a deaf puppy?

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Crowe

Merrimack, NH

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:01am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SIL bred her daughter's English setter and had a nice litter of puppies about 3 months ago. One of the puppies is deaf-the ear hair follicles don't transmit sound vibrations. Other breeders said she should just put it to sleep but she says no way. The dog is gorgeous and has a very sweet personality. We are headed over there in a few hours for my nephew's 21st b-day party and yesterday she "joked" around to save room in our car for something "white, furry with no ears". She desparately wants us to take the dog but with the two moose mutts I already have we are very reluctant. She's had a few people look at him but they decided dealing with a deaf dog would be too difficult for them. If we only had one dog I'd take him but 3 is too many for our lifestyle (the deaf part doesn't bother me). Any suggestions on how to find him a good home? SIL has "dog connections" all over the place but no one's been very helpful.


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Posted: 06/11/06 10:11am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I just did a Google search for Deaf Dog Rescue and came up with some sites - both to help raise a deaf dog and rescue organizations who specialize in them. Perhaps you can find some help there? It can be done, it just takes someone who wants to commit to the special care they require. Hope you can find a good home for the pup.


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Lisa M

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:12am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree with the vet. Put the puppy down. That's what being a good breeder is all about. Culling out the ones with obvious and MAJOR health defects. The majority of pet owners out there don't have the knowledge and experience to properly train a dog who can hear normally. How many people do you know who would be qualified to take on an animal with such a major handicap?


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BubbaWolf

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:13am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2 words: love em.

Dogs are what you make of them. Mine could hear but he listened when he wanted to anyway. I've known people with deaf dogs, they got along just fine. Dog's in general don't know that they have issues. Anyone ever seen a three legged dog, they could care less.

needsomefun

Horse Creek, CA

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lisa M wrote:

I agree with the vet. Put the puppy down.


I must have missed that in the original post.

Why should this animal be put down ??

Lisa M

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:32am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

needsomefun wrote:

Lisa M wrote:

I agree with the vet. Put the puppy down.


I must have missed that in the original post.

Why should this animal be put down ??


My apologies. It was other breeders who told them to put the puppy down. Whoever it was that said it, I agree with that.

CatandJim

Tulsa, as in Oklahoma

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:33am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't agree with the "Other breeders said she should just put it to sleep" either so I am glad she is looking at all options.

My sister has a deaf Boston Terrier and has worked with him to learn hand signals. She didn't buy the dog knowing it was deaf but after only a week or two and of course after they fell in love with him it was apparent something wasn't normal about his hearing. A trip to the vet confirmed their suspicions. Of course she didn't buy her dog from a reputable breeder ( I can't seem to get through to her on that issue) so when they called the breeder they were told Rascal would be put down and if they wanted another dog they would need to "wait for their next litter in a few months". [emoticon]

It takes time and patience to train any dog, a deaf one will take more time. MANY pet owners, including me, have worked with dogs that are deaf or become hard of hearing due to old age and teach them hand signals. I was able to help my sister with Rascal from some previous experience and he is coming right along. We have an almost 16 year old dog currently that can only hear a very loud whistle and he knows to come, sit, and stay by hand signals. Would I "put him down" simply because he has a hearing loss? NO WAY! Even with his other issues he is a fairly active and happy dog for his age.

Search your heart, read up on ways to deal with a deaf dog and then decide if you can make the commitment. Doing a search online for information is always a good idea, just do your best to determine if it's from a reliable source.

On edit: Oh and having other dogs will work in the owner's favor because the deaf one can follow their lead and learn from them while they are teaching/re-enforcing the command with the hand signals.

Good luck Lori!


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sddtin

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:37am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Being deaf was never a handicap for 2 of my many cocker spaniels.

Punkin died a few years ago and now I have Zorro...still very much alive and active within our rescue family of 4 cockers.

Both of my deaf furbabies have been exceptionally sweet and good-natured. I can't imagine anyone wanting to put them to sleep just because they were deaf. They don't seem to realize they are handicapped. It doesn't bother them.

They compensate. They want to see you, so they stay close by. Zorro walks backwards if I get up and confront him as I walk towards him, otherwise he just follows me. When I'm in the garage you can hear him sniffing very loudly to let me know where he is.

If he's sleeping and I'm about to let the others out...I gently touch his shoulder to wake him. During the day, he just follows what the others are doing and always shows up with them in the kitchen to get his treats. He loves camping and going for walks.

I love him so much and can't imagine not seeing his "Here I am Mommy" face. Put him down....no way!


The Tin Twins and their Fab 5 cocker spaniels
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Crowe

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:43am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lisa, I have to disagree. Using the dog as breeding stock would definitely be wrong but to kill it because it is handicapped is NOT the sign of a good breeder in my book. I've seen dogs that are deaf, blind, 3 legged, paralyzed hind legs, diabetic, and a whole host of other issues that survive just fine. I agree that there aren't many people equipped to handle such an animal but there are many parents who aren't "equipped" to handle handicapped children but with the necessary help do so.

Joy, thanks for the suggestion. This is what I am looking for. I'll make the suggestion to her. Her main reason for wanting us to take the dog is so she can still have some association with it I think. He's a real sweetie!

snowhawkwoman

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Posted: 06/11/06 10:44am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a deaf cat - doesn't seem to bother him much - of course I don't need to train him either. I have an elderly stone cold deaf dachshund - he's also almost totally blind - he still gets around just fine - he sees enough shadows to get around and seems to know where everything is so doesn't bump into stuff. (occassionally he runs into the backside of one of the other dogs - they don't mind - I think they all understand he's blind and deaf) I would never "put him down" because he's disabled!! I will let him cross the rainbow bridge when life becomes "painful" for him - right now he is doing fine! My mom had a peek-a-poo that was totally blind the last 3 years of her life - she still played and had a good life! There are a lot of dog trainers (cattle dogs/sheep dogs) come to mind - who train their dogs with hand signals - I think that would be doable. Hope the dear dog finds a good home.


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