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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop

 > declawing a cat

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Rico334

San Angelo, Tx

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Posted: 02/28/07 07:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have an inside the house, 6 month old male cat who we just had neutered about 6 weeks ago. He is full of life and those things hurt!!! Also he is having fun honing them to a razors edge on the side of the couch.

I know it has to hurt about like getting the ends of all our fingertips chopped off, but I know it will correct all these bad points too.

So whats everybodys consensus on having the front paws declawed?


Rick
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rvtommy

blooming prairie minnesota

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Posted: 02/28/07 07:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our cat Yodi ws declawed saved our couch!! But when he sneaks out (only in the summer) he has come back sort of beat up!!! Yodi just can not get away without claws not sure what the answer is?? After 7yrs he is ok but we know if he had claws the couch would not of made it . good luck rvtommy


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computerbug

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Posted: 02/28/07 07:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a friend that takes in strays. She keeps their nails clipped short and it works for her.She sometimes has up to 24 cats and is death on declawing. Try clipping the kittys nails or have the vet show you then make your decision.

Trailer Trash 2

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Posted: 02/28/07 08:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I personally like declawed cats as my cat Rico, one thing you need to take into account, once declawed the will use there teeth and hind legs to get there point acress to you, or anybody else when needed.
And there is Dusty, my wifes cat not declawed it was taught at a early age to claw on her scratching posts which are in three different locations around the house which she does use too, every time she started to claw something she wasn't supose to we took her to HER clawing area and took her tiny paws and did a scratching movement on them, after a while thats all she used of course a squrt bottle get there attention too.


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CatandJim

Tulsa, as in Oklahoma

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Posted: 02/28/07 08:02pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I prefer to clip their claws. Once you get them used to it you can do it every week or two. If your cat EVER goes outside and has the even slightest chance of having to fight or climb to save it's life... PLEASE do not declaw him!


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Code2High

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Posted: 02/28/07 08:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you think that permanently maiming a cat is a good way to solve what is really a temporary problem, go for it. (you DID ask for opinions...there's mine).

Kittens are obnoxious, and their claws can be destructive. Its a phase they do grow out of, though, and in the interim a pair of fingernail clippers (people type is fine) can keep the damage to you and the furniture under control. Cut off just the sharp tips, I hold the clippers perpendicular to the ground and cut so it goes the shortest way through the nail. Takes only a second per nail. Repeat as needed. If this description doesn't make sense to you, or if you aren't confident you can safely do this without a demo, take the kitten to a groomer or a vet and get them to show you how. Having them just do it won't work as this will need to be repeated weekly or more often until the little beast grows up. He's apt to wiggle and argue, a favorite treat between nails will sweeten the deal and a second person to hold the cat while you clip is a big help.

In addition, provide one or more attractive scratching posts, preferably doused with catnip, consider covering the couch or putting a repellant on it (perfume might work, someone mentioned citronella, or Feliway, just be careful not to damage the fabric) and use a spray bottle of water to correct him when he bothers the furniture. If you are using the spray bottle, make a little noise (shhhh... or something like that) as you spray. Soon just the sound will be enough to send him running.

You might also check out Karen Pryor's book on clicker training for cats. It is a fun way to work with your cat and do something productive with all that energy.


susan

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hawkhill

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Posted: 02/28/07 09:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Personally, I don't believe in declawing as it is an amputation and can cause behavioral changes so it would be a last resort for me. I have trained all our cats since they were kittens to use scratching posts - using the same technique that Code2High describes. One addition that helped the survival of our couch is that I also have purchased with each kitten a package of Sticky Paws, a double sided tape that goes invisible on your furniture. Cats do not like to scratch against it and it discourages them from scratching the furniture. Very effective. It can be purchased in any pet store. After the kitten learns to correctly use his scratching posts, I remove it from the furniture. Do try to position your scratching posts near where the kitten sleeps as it is common for a kitten to scratch upon waking up.


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TomNLauraWA

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Posted: 02/28/07 10:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Don't ask me a question like that if you really don't want to hear the answer.


Frankly, declawing a cat is cruel, no matter which way you want to justify it to yourselves. You're taking away his primary weapons should he escape your house and have to defend himself. You're also taking away his sole way of sustaining himself should he have to hunt to survive out there. There's also the reason you yourself gave--it IS tantamount to slicing off each of your fingertips just to save yourself the hassle of grooming your fingernails.

Don't do it. Learn to clip his claws regularly (we do our three cats' claws once a month) and train him to not scratch the furniture. Oh, and people, its FURNITURE....it doesn't feel and it isn't alive. So, it gets scratched. Buy new stuff on occasion. Redecorating can be fun. [emoticon]

I do apologize for being abrasive on this subject but it is one near and dear to my heart.

Please don't declaw


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Maverick1023

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Posted: 03/01/07 02:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have had cats all my life. Everyone I've had since moving out on my own has been declawed. I now have 7 at home ranging in age from 1 year to 14 years ( the two youngest travel with us ). I have NEVER let my cats outside and I've never had one sneak out. I have an excellent Vet who removed the nails not the toes. I admire those who have trained their fur babies to us scratching posts, sometimes I wish it had worked for us, but it didn't. I saw no change in any of our cats personalities after declawing, heck they still scratch the furniture. So, use your own judgment, but I have found no problem with doing it.


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BCDogMom

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Posted: 03/01/07 06:02am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have 2 cats and would never think of getting them declawed. When we first rescued them, I bought SoftPaws for them. They are plastic tips that glue on the nails. I had the vet put them on the first time for $20 total. They lasted about 5 weeks. Then I bought some and DH and I were able to get them on pretty easily. Something you may want to try.


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