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Open Roads Forum  >  Fifth-Wheels

 > Concrete thickness for parking pad?

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cummins2014

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:08pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ryoung wrote:

For the fifth wheel you presently have, 4" thick is sufficient. But if you ever consider upgraging to a motorhome, you will most likely will crack it at that thickness. Always plan for the future. Another 2 inches will add 50% to the concrete cost, but should not add anything to the finishing costs depending on the grade.

ryoung



Is that your opinion , or from experience with a large motorhome parked on concrtete. Lots of people park there motorhomes on conventional driveways.

Jeff4au

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:13pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for all the answers! I think I will go 6" to be certain. That will add @ 6 yards of concrete but as ryoung said should not add to finishing cost.. concrete is @ $100 a yard here.


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dnichol

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your going to the trouble to go to concrete then go ahead & pour 6 inches with 3/8 rebar 16 inches on center with 2 around edges & use 5 1/2 sack mix concrete. The soil in your area will determine if it cracks,if it does the steel will hold it together. Some cracks some don't. J.M.O. 35 yr contractor.


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sirdrakejr

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Maybe you can look into "compressing" the concrete like they build houses. They pull the concrete together under constant pressure and I am told that keeps them from cracking. I don't know what is adds for cost but you may be able to use less concrete if you go the compression route as well as the structural steel.
Frank


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Flyin Finn

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:26pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In theory, 4" can be sufficient, when everything is just right. But I can tell, in real life, here in northwest, when (typical) concrete contractors pour drive ways and such in new construction, it's a quick in-out job, and those driveways - rv pads will NOT hold a motorhome, They already crack even from "normal" car use.
I used to do concrete, so I have seen this first-hand.

For a 4" slab to hold a motor home, it has do be done by a good contractor who knows how to do the job, including proper subgrade work, properly mixed concrete, and a proper curing process.

BTW, my driveway is 4" "standard" slab. I back my (light weight) 5th wheel partially over it when backing in to the gravel rv pad, and that concrete is plenty strong for it.

And it is always good to overdo it if you are not sure, because you don't want to redo it [emoticon]

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Mr Gone

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:34pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Use 6" thick, with 3/4" aggregate, 5% air entrained, Haunch the edges down to local frost requirement, use fiber mesh instead of steel wire.
Vibrate as you screed, burnish or broom finish, burnish is best to keep clean, but slippery at times. If in summer time, wet cure, with curing paper, otherwise cover with tarps, keep it wet to avoid wind set. Also ask Concrete plant to use mid -range plasticizers to cut down on water, which = less cracks.

fatmanobx

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Have them add fiberglass and do away with the wire.


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352

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:35pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As someone said.Go with the monolithic.I built mine and never had a problem.But then I never expected to.6 inches around the slab with 2 #5 rebar and 4 inches through out with wire[image] or fiber in the concrete.10 x 10 control joints cut 3/4 inch.I live in Florida and never had the first crack.


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old guy

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:49pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I guess it depends on how heavy the 5er is

Glen41

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Posted: 01/11/09 03:53pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would talk to a contractor in your area. Soil, substrate, weather, weight. all make a difference. What works in Texas won't work in Colorado. I have been touted to stay with gravel. No cracking, good drainage, easy to re-surface if it settles, no permit required. I'm still thinking...


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