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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Regular cab COG

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socal

san diego, california, usa

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Posted: 07/13/10 08:00pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

hello,
wondering about the center of gravity? have seen it mentioned several times and has got me to thinking. i have a regular cab 1 ton dually on order and curious if i need to be aware of this COG? when i get my slide in camper i would like a northern lite if i can find one. had one before and wish i would have kept it.

any info or advice on the center of gravity on this dodge CTD and camper?

thanks,
david
socal

Itchey Feet

Wyoming

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Posted: 07/13/10 08:16pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The COG should be marked on the TC, as long as (when loaded) the COG on the camper is just @ or forward of the rear axel then that part is no longer a worry. Where the problem comes is when some one puts a 8' or longer camper on a truck that has a short box on it and the COG ends up being behind the rear axel and the extra overhang of (weight) starts "unloading" the front axel and you end up loosing traction on the steer tires. JMHO


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mkirsch

Rochester, NY

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Posted: 07/13/10 08:51pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cab style is irrelevant with respect to the camper's CG.

Your truck's owner's manual will explain camper CG, but in a nutshell, the CG is the "balance point" of the camper. The balance point of the camper needs to be very close to the REAR axle on the truck. Preferably, directly over or slightly ahead.


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~DJ~

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Posted: 07/14/10 07:04am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mkirsch wrote:

Cab style is irrelevant with respect to the camper's CG.

Your truck's owner's manual will explain camper CG, but in a nutshell, the CG is the "balance point" of the camper. The balance point of the camper needs to be very close to the REAR axle on the truck. Preferably, directly over or slightly ahead.


I have to respectfully disagree. Cab style does make a difference with regards to the weight on the front axle. My last outfit was a standard cab Dodge dually and I carried a S&S camper designed for a crew cab. My camper GOG was 18" ahead of the rear axle.

It would have been fine on a CC but with the SC my front axle was overloaded with all ready supporting the Cummins. I ended up moving the camper back a few inches shimmed with treated 4x4's and removed several hundred pounds from my front axle.

This is something the OP needs to consider since he has a standard cab on order.

As you can visualize from this photo, had it been a CC not so much weight would have been put on the front axle.

[image]


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Posted: 07/14/10 07:22am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

My camper GOG was 18" ahead of the rear axle.


This was also my case, I liked this because it allows me to position the camper towards the rear of the truck, throw in a few pieces of wood to keep it from sliding ahead and then I have a lot of extra storage space between the front of the camper and the cab of the truck.
I put a lot of dirty stuff in their like jacks, axes etc.


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socal

san diego, california, usa

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Posted: 07/14/10 07:03pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DJ,

in your picture is your camper shimmed? it appears to be sitting just fine on the truck. also 2x4s or 4x4s work?

thanks for the information.

david
socal

ticki2

NH

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Posted: 07/14/10 09:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

~DJ~ wrote:

mkirsch wrote:

Cab style is irrelevant with respect to the camper's CG.

Your truck's owner's manual will explain camper CG, but in a nutshell, the CG is the "balance point" of the camper. The balance point of the camper needs to be very close to the REAR axle on the truck. Preferably, directly over or slightly ahead.


I have to respectfully disagree. Cab style does make a difference with regards to the weight on the front axle. My last outfit was a standard cab Dodge dually and I carried a S&S camper designed for a crew cab. My camper GOG was 18" ahead of the rear axle.

It would have been fine on a CC but with the SC my front axle was overloaded with all ready supporting the Cummins. I ended up moving the camper back a few inches shimmed with treated 4x4's and removed several hundred pounds from my front axle.

This is something the OP needs to consider since he has a standard cab on order.

As you can visualize from this photo, had it been a CC not so much weight would have been put on the front axle.

[image]


Not to be nit picky but the COG of the camper didn't change with the different truck configuration , only where it was applied to the truck ( different wheel base )

Question , what was the COG dimentions for your S&S ?


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~DJ~

Boise, Idaho

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Posted: 07/15/10 05:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

socal wrote:

DJ,

in your picture is your camper shimmed? it appears to be sitting just fine on the truck. also 2x4s or 4x4s work?

thanks for the information.

david
socal


Yes, this pic may show it better. It is shimmed 5" back from the front of the box with treated lumber. I used a 4x4 which is really 3 1/2 by 3 1/2 and a 2x4 which is really 1 1/2 so total was actual 5". I spent considerable time at a closed state weigh station moving the camper back and forth on the truck to get the measurements I needed to relieve the weight from the front axle.

[image]

ticki2, no the GOG of the camper does not change. But it will affect different trucks differently. The OP was asking about a single cab and this was my experience.

I don't have the camper anymore to measure but if you look at the pic right behind the propane door on the bottom edge is a blob. That blob is a red arrow showing the COG of this camper.

SoCalDesertRider

Arizona desert

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Posted: 07/16/10 07:27am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To find how much weight will be added to the front axle, you need to know the weight of the camper, the wheelbase length of the truck and the position of the camper's center of gravity in relation to the truck's rear axle center. This can be used for figuring weight a gooseneck or fifth wheel trailer will add to the front axle as well.

Take the number of inches the camper center of gravity is ahead of the rear axle (or number of inches the fifth/gooseneck hitch is mounted ahead of the rear axle), divide by the wheelbase length in inches, and then multiply by the weight of the camper (or hitch weight of goose/fifth trailer).

Ld = Load Distance Ahead of Rear Axle
Wb = Wheelbase Length
C = Camper Weight (or 5th/goose trailer hitch weight)
F = Load Weight added to Front Axle

(Ld/Wb)*C = F

For example, if you have a crew cab long bed truck with 170" wheelbase, your camper weighs 3000 lbs and it's center of gravity is 12" ahead of the rear axle, then 12/170*3000 = ~212 lbs added to the front axle.

If the same camper is put on a reg cab long bed truck with a wheelbase length of 140", then 12/140*3000 = 257 lbs added to the front axle.

In this example, the difference is only 50 lbs for crew cab versus regular cab with the same camper and bed length, which is hardly anything to be worried over. [emoticon]

The weight of the heavier crew cab itself versus the lighter regular cab will add more weight to the truck's front axle than the camper will, so the crew cab truck will have a heavier front axle weight than the regular cab truck will, even with the same camper loaded on each truck in the same position.


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SoCalDesertRider

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Posted: 07/16/10 07:32am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That was such a nice truck and camper you had there, DJ. [emoticon]

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