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2oldman

Moses Lake

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Posted: 06/05/12 11:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orion wrote:

Remember , there is no such thing as talking with NO accent!
Being from WA I've never been told I have an accent, although a Canadian once pointed out that I say "prah-ject" instead of "Proh-ject".

Orion

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Posted: 06/05/12 12:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

Orion wrote:

Remember , there is no such thing as talking with NO accent!
Being from WA I've never been told I have an accent, although a Canadian once pointed out that I say "prah-ject" instead of "Proh-ject".

Where I grew up in the UK, the accent used to change every few miles. When I first started working, I would travel through three very distinct accents on my half hour trip to work. I had friends from the city of Birmingham (pronounced properly as 'Birming-um'!) who had two distinct accents as he was from closer in to the city centre where as she was from the outskirts and had a more 'rural' accent. A result of this is that British people of my age have a very sensitive ear to various accents.
When I first came to Canada, I could NOT believe that Canadians and Americans thought that Australians sounded the same as the British! I also couldn't believe that Canadians could not tell the very distinct change, to me anyway, in the accent when we went down into Washington state. My ear used to be so sensitive that I can remember years ago sitting in a bar in Soap Lake and listening to the conversations on two nearby tables. They all had American accents, but the group on one table had heavier accents with a bit of a twang but the other table just sounded American. Turns out on investigation that I could tell the difference between a Washington Coastal & Central Washington accent! One table was local & the other group from Seattle. I can still detect a slight change when we cross the Cascades.
Funnily enough, to my ear, the accent gets less as you travel down the West coast as to me, Californians have 'less' of an accent.


I don't believe in astrology. I am a Gemini and
we're very skeptical.

mowermech

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Posted: 06/05/12 12:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"What really bites my backside (besides tall dogs) are teachers who are intrusted with teaching their charges correct speech and can't even speak correctly themselves."

"INtrusted"??
Shouldn't that be "ENtrusted"?


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2oldman

Moses Lake

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Posted: 06/05/12 12:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orion wrote:

t I could tell the difference between a Washington Coastal & Central Washington accent!
You have a far better ear than I. I've lived here all my life and never noticed that.. I've never noticed any difference in speech all up and down the west coast.

onehorsehitcher

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Posted: 06/05/12 12:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I quit following the thread long ago for various reasons. You are correct in stating that "lead pipe" usage stopped many years ago and was replaced mostly with galvanized steel pipe and or copper. Now little steel pipe is used whether black or galvanized. Mostly some form of plastic pipe, polypropylene,or some other form of plastic, PVC, ABS, and others. Previous to lead pipe, wood was used to transport fluids. However a wood pipe cinch just doesn't send the same message as lead pipe. Just saying!

Lady Fitzgerald

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Posted: 06/05/12 06:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mowermech wrote:

"What really bites my backside (besides tall dogs) are teachers who are intrusted with teaching their charges correct speech and can't even speak correctly themselves."

"INtrusted"??
Shouldn't that be "ENtrusted"?


Yes, it should be. Everyone makes a mistake once in a while, such as the final quotation mark in a sentence in U.S. English (or whatever it is we speak) should be after the punctuation. Brits (and, maybe Canadians and Australians) do it as you did. Your sig. shows you being in Montana and I've never noticed you using Brit or Canadian spellings.


Jeannie

Lady Fitzgerald

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Posted: 06/05/12 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orion wrote:

Quote:

Oh thank you! I HATE this one! I had an art teacher in high school who was from Boston. She would call me Jessi-ker. Oh how I loathed that pronunciation! That, and Jezz-kuh. Make my ears bleed, why don't you?!...


This is very sad! The various accents that make up the US are distinctive and are part of your history, but sadly they are disappearing, partly I feel, as a result of attitudes as this...


There is a difference between an accent and flat mispronouncing words.

2oldman

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Posted: 06/05/12 06:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Orion wrote:

there is no standardised way of pronouncing English,
Can you make a case for axe (ask) and breff (breath)?

Orion

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Posted: 06/05/12 07:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2oldman wrote:

Orion wrote:

there is no standardised way of pronouncing English,
Can you make a case for axe (ask) and breff (breath)?


If there is a standard on pronunciation and usage of English it is only that if it is used by a large percentage of 'educated people' in any group, geographical or socio-economic, it is acceptable. Now how you apply this guideline is any one's guess. Whether an African American lawyer would say to a witness "I am going to axe you a question" would depend maybe of who else was in the courtroom. So maybe in some cases, it would be OK. "A breff of fresh air" though, I have only ever heard in the East End of London, and it don't sound right to me mate!
My dad was from the north of England and like many there he used phrases like "We was". Whether these kind of usages are correct or not has been debated by linguists for years and I don't really have the answer for that.
I do know that I do not pronounce (normally) the final 'R' in Madagascar, and lady Fitz does, I also do pronounce the 'L' in 'solder' and Lady Fitz does not, although it sounds like she is saying a rude word in the UK!
All are correct, no mispronouncing involved.
I

mowermech

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Posted: 06/05/12 07:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"...such as the final quotation mark in a sentence in U.S. English (or whatever it is we speak) should be after the punctuation."

IIRC, it depends on whether the quoted word or phrase is the question or not. If it is the question, then the question mark should be before the quotation marks. If it is not the question, then the question mark should be outside the quotation marks. However, I left school a LONG time ago, I could be wrong. I really don't care all that much, anyway.
But then, the thread was started about misuse and abuse of WORDS, not punctuation.
The Canadians and Brits say "aluminium", we say "aluminum". Both are correct.
We say "hood", they say "bonnet". We say "trunk", they say "boot". We say "station wagon", they say "Estate car (or wagon)".
Which way is correct? Seems to me they both are!
It has been said that we invented the automobile (not really true), but THEY invented the language (not really true, either).
In the greater scheme of things, does it really matter? Probably not.

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