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 > No Pressure Under High Pressure (this could take a while)

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seldomseensmith

Flagstaff, AZ

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Joined: 09/18/2006

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Posted: 10/06/10 09:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sigh.... Another summer camping season comes to a close, and it's time to put the TC away and button her up for winter. But I did get one last extended trip in just recently, and as is my style I want to share it with those who might care to read it. Here goes.....

Aside from spring fall is my favorite time to get out and explore. The storms that threaten to wash out back roads have subsided, the air is crisp and cool, and places that are simply too hot to visit during the warmer months become accessible again. Usually. This year was a reminder that Nature can do whatever it wants, and in this case what she wanted was to make summer last longer than normal.

An entrenched ridge of high pressure set up over the western U.S. in late September, and temperatures all across the region set new records for daytime highs. As much as I wanted to get into canyon country, I realized that it would simply be too warm to be comfortable. So, following the sage advice "when in doubt go higher", I decided to focus on mountains instead.

The good news is out here you can have your cake and eat it too, as there are a few ranges that offer high elevations where mountain flanks are carved by deep canyons. For instance, the Abajo or Blue Mountains and the accompanying Dark Canyon Plateau are one such place. I made my first visit here last year, and barely scraped the surface of what there is to see. The unseasonably hot weather made a return visit seem like an excellent idea.

[image]

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I made my approach from Utah 95, driving the southern leg of Elk Ridge Road. Climbing quickly above the pinyon-juniper woodlands of Cedar Mesa, the road emerges onto a broad and fairly level platform where ponderosa pine, oak, aspen and open meadows of sagebrush dominate the landscape.

[image]

[image]

Even on the high mesa at around 8100 feet it was warm. During that first week daytime highs reached the high 70's and low 80's, very unusual for the time of year. The funny thing is, it looked like fall, and the subdued light was characteristic of shorter autumn days, but the direct sun was fierce and most of the warmer clothes I packed would not be needed.

Hammond Canyon

I decided to start off with some hiking off the outer edge of the plateau, at a likely looking trail called Hammond Canyon. The turnoff was located just past Little Notch, which is also where the 4x4 road to Peavine Corridor takes off. I thought just maybe I'd walk some of the road to see what kind of shape it was in, but that idea never materialized into action. Someday....

[image]

[image]

Having gotten to the trailhead late in the day, I decided to scout out the upper part. My map showed the trail dropping off the rim right at the edge, so naturally I looked there for it. I found several likely looking paths that led into an overgrown forest of scrub oak and aspen, but all leads ended in tall grass and no obvious way forward.

[image]

I was frustrated by my inability to locate the trail, and subsequently used several unflattering terms to describe both the mapmaker and the Forest Service for their failure to have the map reflect the trail head location accurately, or the lack of effort to maintain a trail that was clearly signed from the road.

So, imagine my chagrin when later that evening I decided to walk out to the main road, and lo! and behold, carefully camouflaged in plain sight not 50 yards from my campsite did I spot an innocuous marker heralding the start of the Hammond Canyon trail. [emoticon]

[image]

In my defense the trail does NOT drop off the rim, it parallels it to the south for about 1/4 mile. My mistake was relying on a map with too large a scale to show the necessary detail. Humbled and resolving to do better next time, I nevertheless felt good about tackling the trail the next morning.

After a leisurely breakfast, I saddled up my daypack and began the journey. The upper reaches were heavily treed, giving welcome shade.

[image]

[image]

Only occasionally did the cover break enough to allow for a glimpse of the surrounding terrain.

[image]

At first the trail descends at a moderate grade through the forest. It is obvious to me that I am dropping off a ridge extending into the canyon, and I know the inevitability of a steep grade ahead.

[image]

Soon the shade disappears as larger trees are replaced by scrub oak and other shrubs. The sun is already hot and it is early in the day. I've worn a long sleeve shirt and pants this day because I scratched the bejeezus out of my legs the previous afternoon while bushwhacking for the trail. I already regret the choice on the way down.

[image]

[image]

Soon I can actually see some of the scenery down canyon. Despite knowing the climb back out will be unpleasant, I keep descending.

[image]

[image]

One feature that catches my eye is the rock pillar seen in the first image above. It is very distinctive, and I decide to make the base of it my goal for the day.

[image]

As I near the canyon bottom, trees return offering shade and a cooler environment.

[image]

Finally I am near the base of the rock totem. Unfortunately it is on the opposite side of a steep walled drainage that constitutes the canyon bottom, and I don't have the desire to negotiate it. I am content to appreciate it from here.

[image]

There are a few other notable formations in my field of view, including this rock "igloo".

[image]

[image]

This one looks like a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtle to me:

[image]

The trail continues down canyon, and it sure looks like there are very beautiful formations further in. But I am not enthusiastic about pushing on, as I know the steep, exposed, and hot walk out awaits me. Instead I take a nice long break in the shadow of the forest beneath the iconic rock monolith, then begin the slog out.

Even dropping 1200 feet into the canyon, I am soon out of the worst part and back in the shadier sections of the upper trail. When I get back to camp I am ready to change back into shorts and a short sleeve shirt, and maybe even take a well deserved nap. [emoticon]

Horse Pasture Canyon

The next day brought the next choice. Looking at the geography of the Dark Canyon Plateau, I presumed trails following a canyon as opposed to a ridge might offer more shade, as these environments tend to be slightly cooler and wetter. I decided on Horse Pasture Canyon to the north, along the road to Deadman Point. With name like that how could I resist?

[image]

Fortunately for me, there was no mistaking where the trail began. Like Hammond Canyon, the path stays high for the first couple miles, making for a pleasant stroll through a peaceful forest. I was fairly sure I would not see others on this trip as the trail register had few entries, the most recent being four days earlier.

[image]

[image]

[image]

Once the trail reached the level of white sandstone that comprises the inner canyon, it begins a steep drop. Near the bottom I encountered this gate placed across a narrow section - this area was used extensively by Al Scorup and the S&S Cattle Co., so I figure it belongs to the ranching past of the region.

[image]

[image]

At the bottom the canyon opens up into a broad sandy basin, making it ideal from a ranchers' point of view for containing stock - my guess would be that's where the name comes from anyway. I did not run across any cattle, sheep, or horses, but instead found a beautiful and serene landscape surrounded by glorious white sandstone sculptures draped with a mantle of stately trees.

[image]

[image]

[image]

[image]

From here the path heads to the junction with Dark Canyon proper, where a long loop hike on the Woodenshoe trail awaits hikers looking for a multi-day adventure.

[image]

Me, I decide on an extended rest period in the golden shade of a fall cottonwood, being caressed by warm (pleasantly warm, thank you) breezes while straining to hear a sound other than the gentle rustling of dried leaves and my own heartbeat.

[image]

Eventually I have to climb out, so reluctantly I leave the solitude behind and grunt my way uphill to the truck.

[image]

From here, it's on to Deadman Point to see if there really are any dead guys around. Actually I read later that cowboys from many years earlier had come across a saddle, some riding gear and boots with no clue as to the whereabouts of the owner. They assumed some poor fellow had "gone 'round the bend with loneliness or some such affliction" and had thrown himself off the edge of the canyon. A colorful tale to be sure, but one whose veracity is subject to question.

When I arrived at the aforementioned point, it was beautiful but not as rewarding as I had hoped. The "point" is actually located another half mile along a now closed road, and the terminus is brushy and overgrown, with little in the way of sweeping vistas. Even so, I was happy to make it my resting place for the night.

[image]

[image]

[image]

[image]

The Blues

After two rewarding hikes off the plateau and the continuation of unseasonably warm weather I decided the next day what I really wanted was to go higher. Logically the next destination had to be the Abajo, or Blue Mountains. I had visited these laccolithic landmarks last fall, and really liked what I saw. Specifically I wanted to hike a longer distance on the Skyline Trail, possibly reaching the summit of one of the peaks that make up the Blues.

For the sake of convenience I decided to camp on a short spur road just off what is called the The Causeway. This lofty road runs along the southern exposure of the mountain offering awesome views of the lower country, and is a main route for access to the backcountry.

[image]

[image]

I knew I'd see a few more folks, but the tradeoff of being near a couple of trailheads and being able to leave my rig set up was worthwhile.

[image]

Skyline Trail to Mt. Linnaeus

I had hiked a portion of the Skyline trail the previous fall, but only so far as a prominent ridgeline well below any summit. What I had hoped to do was use connector trails as shown on my map (yes, that map) to hike a loop. On my previous visit I tried in vain to locate the spur trail which would allow such a trip, and I resolved I would find it this time.

[image]

Early the next morning off I went, up the narrow valley that leads to the ridge. It is a steep trail at first, with lots of loose material and tree debris in the trail bed, but it covers some very pretty country.

[image]

[image]

Fall in the mountains is usually hunting season. I expect to see hunters pretty much anywhere I go, and I am used to it. So I was kind of surprised when I walked right up on a buck with his harem. Of course the second just before I snapped this picture this guy was looking right at me.

[image]

They did not stick around, although the next day I'm pretty sure I saw this guys head being packed out by some lucky hunters.

The aspen trees were luminous in the early morning light, and I walked through corridors of soft, golden yellow light as I huffed my way up the hill.

[image]

[image]

Eventually I reached the ridge, where the dominant vegetation is scrub oak. This stuff is pernicious, growing together with the determination of the hive mind. I vividly remembered trying to find the elusive connector trail (#457) in the midst of the dense, clutching oak, only to be defeated.

[image]

Realizing that without more information I would probably never find the trail I was seeking, I chose to press on up the ridge in search of a better destination.

The ridge is a long, gentle slope that separates the southern flank of the mountain from Tuerto Canyon to the north. The views are beautiful, and it is easy to eat up miles walking along this high promenade.

[image]

[image]

[image]

Rounding the side of a small hill to the north, the trail emerges into the western basin flanking the side of Mt. Linnaeus. Linnaeus is not the highest point in the Blues, but it is the closest high point and that will do. And of course up this high the fall colors are in full swing.

[image]

[image]

As expected, I see some real hunters working their way across the basin in search of wily game animals. And I say real because these guys are doing it the right way. We don't need no stinkin' ATVs!

[image]

The trail begins a long gradual ascent of the basin, all the while keeping the destination front and center. It was hard trying to absorb the scenery and keep from stumbling off the trail's edge, but somehow I managed.

[image]

[image]

[image]

Near the saddle where the trail crosses to the other side of the mountain a barely discernible track takes off south to the "summit". Unfortunately the actual highest point is clothed in trees, making views from the top very poor. Instead I settle on a bald rocky knob just below the high point where you can at least see clearly to the east.

[image]

[image]

My barometer based altimeter displays the elevation here as 10,540 feet, which is reasonably accurate as the map indicates the high point to be 10,943. The watch is usually accurate within 200 feet or so, and it has been a while since I calibrated it with a reference pressure. Good enough for yours truly.

[image]

As I begin the descent I spot another group of horsemen crossing the basin. My tired feet and legs spur a small stab of jealousy as I watch the group disappear over the ridgeline. I wonder - could I fit a horse into my camper?

[image]

The way down is always easier, and I find myself straying from the trail frequently to check out this or that. I stood at the edge of Tuerto Canyon for a while taking in the folds and creases of the topography. I decide there and then that I will hike Tuerto Canyon trail tomorrow.

[image]

On the way back across the ridge, I made another (hopeless) attempt to locate the upper end of Trail No. 457. Not seeing a single indication of any kind that confirms the existence of the fabled trail, I resolve I will surely find the lower end tomorrow along the Tuerto Canyon trail.

Tuerto Canyon

I like to hike, in case you somehow missed that. In fact, my camper really serves as a means to get me to far flung places so I can explore on foot. It works as exercise, it allows me to see places I might not otherwise experience, and I love being out of doors in remote locations, far from the casual tourist.

So for me to say I did not enjoy my Tuerto Canyon hike nearly as much as I'd hoped is saying something. Like a fisherman, a bad day fishing is usually better than a good day at work - same for hiking in my book.

It all started out innocently enough, although to be honest I had somehow tweaked my left ankle and it bothered me upon rising that morning. Anyway I figured it would stretch out over the course of the morning, so off I went.

[image]

The beginning of Tuerto also marks one end of the Trough Canyon trail - the sign says so (so does my infernal map). Now I was not really thinking about hiking Trough Canyon this day, but later on I changed my mind for reasons that will become clearer.

For a canyon trail Tuerto does not descend into the bottom of a chasm, at least not for a good long while. Rather it climbs up over the western shoulder of the ridge I had surmounted the day before.

The trail is steep in places, but not too bad, and the scenery as always is beautiful.

[image]

[image]

Once the trail makes the corner to the north facing slope the vegetation becomes denser, limiting the view to the surrounding area.

[image]

[image]

About half a mile in I encountered a small group of hunters packing out a buck they had harvested. I congratulated them on their success, and was about to head on when one of the guys told me that they had come across a gut pile from an earlier kill along the trail. I nonchalantly said I'd wave at any bears I saw and started up the trail.

I almost always hike alone, and occasionally it crosses my mind that I may be fortunate enough to see a bear or mountain lion in the backcountry - it has happened before. I'm not fearful, as I know most wild animals will go out of their way to avoid humans. Yes, in rare instances people have been attacked, but I don't dwell on that. In my mind, I'm more likely to die in a traffic accident than be eaten by a large predator.

And before I hear a chorus of "yeah but what if....?" I would like to let you know that:
  • someone always know where I'm going (in general anyway)
  • I carry a pack full of essentials including extra food, water, clothing, etc.
  • I am trained in wilderness medicine
  • and as a last resort I carry a PLB


So I kept on hiking and before long came across the leavings of a thoughtless hunter. Right on the trail were the remains of a deer - cape, gut pile, legs, anything the hunter did not want to pack out. Now I know it is easy to second guess another person's actions, but leaving this bloody fly blown mess right on the trail was to my mind pure laziness.

Out of consideration for more squeamish readers I took this long shot of the carcass - the biggest piece can be seen on the right side of the trail.

[image]

Immediately I had the thought that such a sumptuous banquet would be a clarion call to any hungry carnivores, and here I am standing next to it. I scanned the ground for any sign of lion or bear tracks, and seeing none realized the kill was fresh enough to have gone unnoticed - for now.

I decided hanging around was a bad idea, and quickly left the scene. While walking a sense of nervous apprehension quietly began nibbling at the edge of my consciousness. I scanned the surrounding woods and thickets more carefully and decide to announce my presence every 50 feet or so by speaking some random words in a loud but confident voice.

[image]

While walking along, I realize that I really don't want to go back the way I came, thus conveniently avoiding the chance of meeting anything that might not appreciate its dinner being interrupted. A light bulb goes off in my head - I'll hike until I find the intersection with either the Trough Canyon trail or the less likely missing Trail #457. Both are marked clearly on my map (yes, that map) so I should be able to find one or the other, right?

Reaching this sign, I feel a sense of relief. That fact that it is in pieces should have been a warning.

[image]

The arrow for Trough Canyon clearly points in a likely direction. Following that arrow leads you nowhere. I know, I tried. I looked high, I looked low, I wandered into oak thickets seeking a sign, a cairn, anything to show the trail. Ain't happening. By now I'm figuring just like the missing Trail 457 that this end of Trough Canyon sees so little use that Nature has reclaimed it. That or I am a COMPLETE idiot (comments should be reserved for complimentary statements on the nature of this post).

So, I'm down to what I'm sure will a futile search for #457. I can see now why it would be a lost cause, as the slope on this north side of the ridge is choked with vegetation. And like a self-fulfilling prophecy, I walk on through and past the area shown on the map (yes, that map) and see absolutely nothing.

In kind of a resigned funk, I realize I've already come this far and now I have no choice but to return the same way, so I might as well continue on. I can see the trail begins to descend a ridge into Tuerto Canyon, and I doggedly trudge on until.....

[image]

Does a bear s**t in the woods? No, the bear always s**ts on the trail. While not especially fresh (not steaming, thank goodness), this is just one one more nagging worry. The tracks around the scat are fairly fresh, and go both directions. The pads indicate a smallish bear, but even a small bear is more than I want to tangle with.

Now I'm really on the lookout, and as I traipse down into Tuerto Canyon I realize I'm not really enjoying myself the way I had hoped.
Then, to add the proverbial cherry to my deteriorating fun fest, I notice for the first time big black clouds building around me.
Great, the high pressure is finally breaking down, but I really don't want to add dodging lightning bolts to my plate right now.

[image]

Up ahead I see that if I drop a bit farther in, I can get some decent pictures, so I make haste as the trail begins the descent. Of course I soon run into two more generous piles of bear scat. Time to snap the pictures and boogie.

[image]

[image]

[image]

The trip out was uneventful, as anyone probably knew it would be. I did make a lot of noise on the way, and anyone within earshot probably thought some lunatic was loose in the woods. Once I got past the trailside buffet I began to relax, and soon found my happy place once more.

[image]

[image]

Once I reached the camper I began making plans to return next year with a better map and find those damn trails!

[image]

That night it rained hard and long, finally breaking the long hot, dry spell. I decided it was time to leave the mountains and head for Capitol Reef to enjoy my last two days of freedom. On the way is a really cool rest stop on Highway 95 just above Hite on the north end of Lake Powell.

Hog Springs Canyon

Hog Springs Rest Area sits at the mouth of a canyon on the highway, and for most folks it is just a pretty place to stretch legs and tap the bladder.

[image]

I'd stopped here before, but only recently read of a relatively short hike into the canyon. I had just put on my daypack when a very friendly local servicing the rest stop clued me into some pictographs and petroglyphs nearby. I found two of three she told me about - one is obvious but the other would never be seen if you did not know where to look.

The obvious one, located in a large alcove just east of the rest stop.

[image]

[image]

The secret one, which is well, secret.

[image]

[image]

The hike up the canyon was nice too, although recent flash flooding had obliterated the designated trail, leaving all progress to a willingness to bushwhack, scramble, and pick a way through.

[image]

[image]

This image reminds me of a disgruntled gremlin peering out of the rock:

[image]

I went as far as where another side canyon enters from the west. There is another large alcove at the head of this canyon, but I began hearing thunder close by at this point, and decided to head back.

[image]

It was getting late, and I still had a ways to go. I was looking forward to settling in at Capitol Reef and getting a bit more hiking in the next day.

I was in for a rude surprise. I rolled into the Park about 4 o'clock only to be greeted by a sign declaring the campground full. I don't know what sort of convergence was occurring, but European travelers driving Class C motorhomes in numbers unheard of had descended on the park, leaving no room for me.

I ended up staying at an RV park of all places because the forecast called for heavy rain, and I knew what would happen if I tried to boondock any backcountry roads in the area. After all, the bear didn't get me but the gumbo certainly would.

RV park or no, it was a good choice as it started raining shortly after my arrival. In fact it rained all the way home, and then some.
Besides, they offered hot showers and Wifi. Connecting my netbook to the web I was gratified to see the world kept going despite my weeklong absence. [emoticon]

I leave you with these final pictures. I know I'll be gazing longingly at images from this summer's trips, using them to get me through the long dark nights ahead.

[image]

[image]

Happy Trails!


The Road Goes Ever On



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Matho

New Mexico Texas

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Posted: 10/06/10 09:47pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wow, that's a great trip report. You must be in need of sme new hiking boots after all that terrain covered.

I think that gremlin in the rock looks like the Grinch that stole Christmas.


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punomatic

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Posted: 10/06/10 10:14pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Beautiful pictures. We northwesterners don't get to see that kind of scenery, unless we travel to the southwest. But then, we have our own beautiful places. Glad you were able to make one last trip before the season ended. And thank goodness you remembered the camera!! Thanks for the great report.


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NW22

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Posted: 10/06/10 10:31pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for sharing your great pictures!

Camper_Jeff_&_Kelli

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Posted: 10/07/10 12:28am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Pretty spectacular post. Thanks for the time you spent putting this together. Compliments on the high quality of your images.


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c.traveler2

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Posted: 10/07/10 12:51am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always enjoy reading about your adventure,great photos and story.


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JimK-NY

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Posted: 10/07/10 04:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Great pictures, but they just make me sick. You visited some of my most favorite spots and here I am getting ready to go to work and waiting for my house to sell so I can retire and spend time in those areas. Anyone want to buy a house on Long Island?

Thanks for sharing even though I have a hard time looking at them.

kohldad

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Posted: 10/07/10 06:51am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just what I needed while being stranded at home while my heel heals. Along with your comment of carrying a PBL, I think it's time I got one too.

Thanks for posting the pic of the bear scat. I thought I had seen some up in the Wilderness Trail but wasn't sure.

Last question, what camera/lens are you using to take all of the fantastic photos?

Thanks for the pics and taking time to post them. Guess I'll try to get out this winter for a few photos and trip reports to help you make through the long winter.


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capeangler

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Posted: 10/07/10 07:55am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wow , what a great trip report !!! thanks I really enjoyed reading it .

question what is a PBL ?


Thanks
capeangler
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seldomseensmith

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Posted: 10/07/10 08:11am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you all. Again I find myself humbled by the graciousness of your comments.

capeangler wrote:

wow , what a great trip report !!! thanks I really enjoyed reading it .

question what is a PBL ?

Personal Location Beacon

Kohldad, I basically use a high end point and shoot made by Canon. It has mostly automatic settings, but also allows the user to adjust shots manually. It also has an 80x zoom (20x manual + 60x digital) making it easier to get those long shots.

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