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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Dually or no

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19gc45

Vancouver Island

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:06pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Assuming that a hitch along the lines of the Propride or Pullrite is installed for stability, I'm looking for opinion re the desirability of DRW, since stability seems to be the main advantage of same. Talking TT here, specifically AF 30U GVWR 10400#.

* This post was edited 04/22/11 06:41pm by 19gc45 *


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Dave H M

IL

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:09pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Seems like you already made uo your mind. If you think it takes two wheels on each side for stability, then that is the answer.

[emoticon]

MackinawMan

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:17pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

While it seems to make a fairly significant difference on pulling 5ers I don't know that it would make THAT big of a difference with "bumper pull" travel trailers.

We just went truck shopping, ended up with a SRW with the longbed (long wheelbase). We considered a DRW, but in the end I just didn't think it'd make that big of a difference with a TT, so we ended up buying a SRW. Less expense obviously


2000 Ford F350 XLT 7.3L PowerStroke Diesel CC 4x4 OffRoad SRW Long Bed
2008 Jayco Eagle 314BHDS (Momma Eagle)
Equalizer Hitch System (1400/14000lbs)
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Curt XD Class V Receiver Hitch (1500/15000 lb)

Golden_HVAC

Fulltime, CA, USA

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:33pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

HI,

It depends on the trailer you plan on towing, and the year of truck that you plan on buying.

Back in 1986, the DRW F-350 was rated at 10,000 GVWR and the empty weight was close to 7,000 pounds with a 460" gas engine or 6.9 diesel. They where not rated to tow as much as today, so the 3,000 pound cargo rating did not matter to much. By 1993, the DRW had increased to around 12,000 pounds GVWR, and you could carry more in them.

In 2005, Ford increased the GVWR of the F-250 to about 10,000 pounds, depending on how it is configured, so that if you get a 400 pound option like crewcab, the GVWR went up by about 400 pounds. The F-350 SRW went to 11,500 pounds that year too, if you got heavy options, like diesel engine, crewcab, 4 wheel drive.

The problem started with the F-250 and F-350 of 2000, when a 4 wheel drive F-250 crewcab diesel might weigh 8,000 pounds empty, and has a 8,800 pound GVWR, so it can only carry 865 pounds without exceding it's GVWR. So for 2005, Ford increased the GVWR to allow about 3,000 pounds in the F-250 and 4,000 pounds in the F-350 SRW, and around 5,000 - 5,600 in the F-350 DRW.

If you are looking at 2500 and 3500 series trucks, they can not carry that much weight, and their GVWR is lower.

So once you decide on a trailer, then pick the truck. With a F-350, you should have plenty of stability, even with a 2,500 pound hitch weight, 150 pound hitch, and passengers in the truck. It will not wallow around like a sick elephant.

If it does wallow around, look at the stabilizer bars, anti-sway bar, shock absorbers. If those are worn out, then it can lead to in-stabiilty, if it has 2 or 4 rear tires.

Also conside that polyester sidewall tires are much softer than all steel tire, such as Goodyear all steel tire, or Michelin X Rib tire. You can look at two identical tires on the showroom floor, not mounted, and tell what one is the steel sidewall. That will lead to much greater sidewall stability, and resistance to sway in a curve.

Fred.

SoCalDesertRider

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:43pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

F350DRW pickup GVWR was 10,000 lbs and RGAWR was 7400 lbs from '80-97. Empty weight of the old body F350DRW pickups is in the 6000-7000 lbs range, depending on cab size and engine type. Obviously, a crew cab and diesel engine are heavier than a regular cab and gas engine. F350DRW pickups '80-'97 are 2wd only. 4wd duallys were available in 60" cab/chassis form only (no pickup bed), with 11,000 GVWR and 8250 RGAWR.

F350SRW pickup GVWR was 9000 and 9200 lbs with RGAWR of 6084 lbs for '80-'97. F350SRW were available in regular and crew cab with long bed only in these years, both 4wd and 2wd.

F250 pickup GVWR was 8600 and 8800 lbs with RGAWR of 6084 lbs for '80-'97. F250's were available with regular or super cab and long bed only up to '95. Super cab short bed and crew cab short bed were added for '96-'97, with 460 and 7.3 diesel engines only. Crew cab long bed was not available.

'99-'04 F350DRW pickups were available in all 3 cab sizes in both 4wd and 2wd. I believe the GVWR was 11,500 and the RGAWR was 8250. I don't think short beds were available with the dually.

'99-'04 F350SRW pickups were available in all 3 cab sizes and short and long beds (long bed only with regular cab) in both 4wd and 2wd. GVWR was 9900 lbs and RGAWR was 6830 lbs.

'99-'04 F250 pickups were available in all 3 cab sizes and short and long beds (long bed only with regular cab) in both 4wd and 2wd. GVWR was 8800 lbs and RGAWR was 6084 lbs.

'05-up F350DRW pickups have up to 13,000 lbs GVWR and 9750 lbs RGAWR, 3 cab sizes, long bed, 4wd and 2wd.

'05-up F350SRW pickups have up to 11,500 lbs GVWR and up to 7280 lbs RGAWR, 3 cab sizes, both bed sizes, 4wd and 2wd.

'05-up F250 pickup have up to 10,000 lbs GVWR and up to 6200 lbs RGAWR, 3 cab sizes, both bed sizes, 4wd and 2wd.

* This post was last edited 04/22/11 07:00pm by SoCalDesertRider *   View edit history


01 International 4800 4x4 CrewCab DT466E Allison MD3060
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19gc45

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Posted: 04/22/11 06:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dave H M wrote:

Seems like you already made uo your mind. If you think it takes two wheels on each side for stability, then that is the answer.

[emoticon]

No, I haven't made up my mind. I've heard duallies increase stability but that may be more for fivers. The rig I'll be towing is 10400# GVWR, so a Ram 2500 (no dually available) might be adequate. "Changing Gears" calculator indicates it is, but without much TV GVWR remaining.
$$money weighs in to the decision--vehicle purchase price, tire price, higher fuel consumption. If I don't need a 3500, good.

SoCalDesertRider

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Posted: 04/22/11 07:03pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you want 2 rear tires, go with the 3500/350SRW, they have greater GVWR and RGAWR than the 2500 trucks, with very little difference in price, no physical difference in size of the truck and no measureable difference in fuel economy. The 350/3500 SRW is a no-brainer in lieu of the lesser rated 250/2500.

19gc45

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Posted: 04/22/11 07:21pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SoCalDesertRider wrote:

If you want 2 rear tires, go with the 3500/350SRW, they have greater GVWR and RGAWR than the 2500 trucks, with very little difference in price, no physical difference in size of the truck and no measureable difference in fuel economy. The 350/3500 SRW is a no-brainer in lieu of the lesser rated 250/2500.


I hadn't checked fuel economy difference between the 2500 & 3500. Just assumed the 2500 would perform better. Thanks.

Bigfootchevy

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Posted: 04/22/11 07:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SoCalDesertRider wrote:

If you want 2 rear tires, go with the 3500/350SRW, they have greater GVWR and RGAWR than the 2500 trucks, with very little difference in price, no physical difference in size of the truck and no measureable difference in fuel economy. The 350/3500 SRW is a no-brainer in lieu of the lesser rated 250/2500.


EXCELLENT ADVISE SoCalDesert:

Paul


catfishmontana

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Posted: 04/22/11 07:39pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Last year (actually 11 months ago) I bought a brand spanking new dually. it pulled like a dream, rode nice, etc. But it was also my daily driver. Spring through Fall it was a pleasure to drive. You don't notice the extra 2 tires unless you look in the mirror. Then Winter hit....I now own a brand spanking new 1 ton with single rear wheels. If you use your truck as a driver other than towing, its something to consider. Granted, I was asking that dually to plow some serious snow and mud to get onto remote oil rig locations, but the single rear wheel trucks are much easier for me to get into those locations in adverse conditions.


2016 F350 Platinum Dually, CC
2014 Cyclone 3800 toyhauler
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