RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Truck Campers: Newfoundland by TC

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Newfoundland by TC

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Next
Sponsored By:
Clattertruck

Centennial Colorado

Senior Member

Joined: 06/19/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 10/23/12 02:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Newfoundland by TC

Looking back on trips we have made, the outstanding ones are fondled by our memory. It is with sweet nostalgia we remember the poignant times and details.
One of our most memorable destinations was Newfoundland in 2005. From Colorado we left our home and travelled the northern states until we crossed into Ontario Canada at Sault Ste. Marie Michigan. Our rig at that time was a 10 ft. Northstar on a 2002 F350 DRW 7.3 diesel.

We spent a month touring Eastern Canada, which was very rewarding.
We moved on to Nova Scotia on HWY 104 heading for New Glasgow and to North Sidney where the ferry departs for what is known as "The Rock".

[image]

You meet the nicest people while waiting for the ferry. We arrived at the ferry terminal at 5:30 for a 2:30 AM departure (one way $165.00 for truck and 2 seniors).

With a lot of time to kill we chatted with others who were in the same situation. Most of them only have cars to sit in instead of and instant cabin like we had.. [image]
We set up our lawn chairs and sat drinking wine and beer.

[image]
This trucker had his family with him. they were going to visit friends while he delivered produce. Conflict with nighttime moose is dangerous to truckers.

[image]
The ferry trip was enervating. Semis parked next us were running their reefers all night right next to us. We could not sleep but for an hour or so. Loading started at 1:00 AM for the six hour voyage. After loading we found reclining chairs to sit in. They were not bad but sleeping was difficult.

[image]
The ferry entered Port-Aux-Basques at 8:30 AM through a very narrow opening. No doubt the Captain is always stressed. Immediately one sees that Newfoundland (pronounced New-fun-land) is different. The town of Port-Aux-Basques looks small, simple, and 1950s fishing village. The houses remind us of Wrangle Alaska

[image]

The Atlantic Provinces have a crust of population around the sea coasts, but inland is wild and boggy. The boreal forest keeps civilization at bay. Rarely is there a community out of sight of salt water.
[image]

Sleep deprivation hammered us as we left Port-aux-Basque, but we stopped at Stephenville for shopping. In the store parking lot, two different men walked up to the camper to tell us welcome to Newfoundland. Yes, these are very friendly people. What a nice touch of fleeting kindness.

[image]

We drove on to Corner Brook and into a camp ground. We were in bed by 7: PM.

[image]
The Kinsman Prince Edward CG was being repaired so we had to use the overflow field

Refreshed in the morning, we headed for Gros Morne National Park on HWY 430.
[image]
Winter House Brook

At 431 we turned towards Trout River which is a small fishing village. We did not know what to expect. Our tour of the main street was engrossing.
[image]

Here was a fishing community that has changed little in the last century. The fishing industry is down, but the people tenaciously cling to their way of life.

[image]
Winter is on the way, a man was cutting wood for his winter stock.

[image]
Houses are small so they are easier to heat. Some of the homes have entrances placed high or at the second floor. The snow piles up to 5 feet on the level.

This town has no “pretty people” for the summer, and no cutesy shops tended by wealthy hobbyists. There are simply residents of long maritime traditions.
These are sturdy folks who have leaned into the wind on small boats in a dangerous life for small rewards.

Leaving Trout River we passed through Gros Morne National Park.
[image]
Lobster Cove Lighthouse

The road (430) follows the rocky coast at the edge of the Tablelands, which are a vast bog of stunted trees and peat that lead to the Long Range Mountains. The trees near the shore are sculpted by the wind so they look as if they flow away from it. These balsam fir and spruce trees are called “Tuckamore” by Newfoundlanders.
[image]
Tuckamore leans from the wind, never able to stand against it.

[image]
Our route up the northwest coast along the Gulf of St Lawrence to headlands facing the Atlantic.

North of the Park we camped at Port au Choix (Port of Choice). There is evidence here that four ancient native cultures were here for 5500 years. The campground is managed by the local Lions Club. The elderly man tending the camp was a delight.

[image]
It was only 100 yds from the waters of the bay. Until late evening, we the only people there.

[image]
The busy season was over. The weather was clear and mild.

From Port au Choix on the Northern Peninsula, we traveled to the far tip to
L’Anse aux Meadows (Cove of Meadows).

[image]
The headlands here are arctic; stunted trees, brush, and grasses. The Atlantic brings a Siberian chill to the coast line.

It is the site where the Vikings made the actual first landing in North America. Columbus, of course never came close. He touched the Caribbean Islands and the coast of Venezuela. All controversy about the Vikings being first was settled in 1960 when Norse archeologists with help of a local guide found and excavated the site.

[image]
Artifacts clearly identifiable to be Norse were found. They called it Vinland in their historic sagas. The wild berries the found reminded them of vineyards.

The National Historic Site has reconstructed the type of buildings that were used around 1000AD. They have done a first class job, and the interpreters were excellent.

[image]
The actors.

[image]
Interior construction.

[image]
As one follows the roads here, you see piles of logs on the edge of the road. The piles have tags identifying the owner. This is winter fuel so necessary for survival. Stealing the wood is a very serious matter.

[image]
From the Meadows we went 50Km south to St. Anthony (2700 pop.), which was the setting for the novel and movie Shipping News. We found good light in the morning to photograph the city surrounding the natural harbor.
The history of European settlement of St. Anthony reaches back to the early 16th century, when French and Basque fishermen used the well-sheltered harbour as a seasonal fishing station. By the time explorer Jacques Cartier came across the settlement in 1534, he reported it was named St. Anthony Haven.
After St. Anthony we returned down the West Coast pounding our way through frost heaves. We arrived at Deer Lake on the Trans Continental Highway expecting to find it easy to locate a good camp at this busy intersection. No such luck, there was only the municipal park. The sites were not bad, but they were on a road to where the local youth gather for mating exercises and then race their cars up and down the road. Activity abated about 2 AM.

[image]

We were now in the Central Region of NL. HYW 330 to 331 to 340 took us to the historic town of Twillingate on North Twillingate Island. The headlands face the unpitying Atlantic waters. Settled around 1700, French fishermen named it Toulinguet after a Point near Brest, France. It is a large fishing port of 2600 citizens.
[image]
Twillingate headland.
The earliest known people to inhabit the area were the Maritime Archaic who occupied the area about 3,500 years ago. in 1500 BC. The Maritime Archaic people were later supplanted by the Beothuk.

[image]
The Long Point Lightstation at the end of the island is well preserved and still in operation. Built in 1876, Long Point lightstation is situated atop of a cliff called Devil's Cove Head in Notre Dame Bay (a.k.a. Iceberg Alley).

[image]
We were fortunate to meet the lightstation keeper who was there checking on its operation. He gave us a private tour up to the top on 130 year old stairs showing the original wood burnished by history. He explained that there are no ice bergs that year because the current is farther east than usual.

[image]
Our camper below.

[image]
Long Point
[image]
Looking for whales, and one was spotted.

[image]
Our campground was called Windmill Bight.

[image]

After Twillingate our route went through Boyd’s Cove and Musgrave Harbour on HWY 330. The little loop through Boyd’s Cove proved to be a world class piece of disintegrated pavement. It was 5 to 10 MPH until it turned into gravel which was much better. Returning to the main highway, TCH 1 we went through Tera Nova NP and then proceeded NE up the Bonavista Peninsula to the town of Bonavista and the Lightstation on the cape.
[image]
This is the location where John Cabot probably put his foot ashore in 1497 under commission by the English. His actual name was Caboto and he was Italian. The English thought it better to imply that he was from Britain.

[image]
Cape Bonavista

[image]
We had met our daughter, Sarah in St John's and retraced some of our steps.
We showed Sarah Cape Bonavista and the town. The day was sunny at moments between squalls of sharp rain.

[image]
The wind was trying to take us off the headlands at a steady 30 to 40 knots. While at the Lightstation, we thought of the fishermen who have seen their end on days like this. Little did we know that a fishing boat was capsized with eight hands in grave danger. News reports of the next day said that four were rescued by the Coast Guard and one body recovered. The Captain’s youngest brother was gone with two other men. I was reminded of the book title I had seen, “A sea of Mother’s Tears” referring to the frightful Atlantic.

[image]
Bonavista headlands as a storm comes with angry clouds.

[image]
Southwest from Cape Bonavista is the town of East Trinity. Across the bay is historic town of Trinity.

[image]
East Trinity has a an excellent 5km trial that is easy for young people but a bit difficult for ancient bad-knee folks. Oddly, the next day, the hurting joints of the walk were not even felt. Motrin and beer in large quantities are excellent natural remedies.

[image]
Sarah on helpful steps.

[image]

[image]

[image]

[image]
Looking at Trinity from the Skerwink.

Trinity has an interesting collection of buildings some going back to the 18th century. Most of the structures date from the 19th and early 20th centuries.

[image]
Holy Trinity Catholic Church established in 1833.

[image]
Parish Hall 1898.

[image]

[image]
St Paul's Anglican Church. first built 1730, third structure 1892.

[image]
Campbell house 1840.

Englishman Richard Whitbourne fished in Trinity Harbour in 1579. Later in1620 he proclaimed Trinity Harbour “… the best and largest in the land”.
An interesting historical factoid is that in 1800 Dr. John Clinch experimented here smallpox vaccination, a first in medical history.

St John's
[image]
St. John’s metro area is about 200,000 population. Over half the population of Newfoundland lives in the metro area of the Provincial Capital.

[image]
St. John’s has a long history dating back to the sixteenth century. The old central city burned four times, and as a consequence the buildings are mostly late nineteenth century and early twentieth century.

[image]
Sarah shopping.
Both houses and businesses are colorfully painted. There are plentiful places for dining and nightlife. Cruise ships dock there almost daily and flood the streets with potential money spenders.

[image]
Big time shoppers.

[image]
Glitterman. Every famous city has to have this type attention starved oddball.

[image]
We stayed at Pippy Park Camp Ground, which is close to downtown and the Airport. It was quite satisfactory.

Cape Spear is near St. John's.
[image]
Cape Spear Lightstation.

[image]
Cape spear is the farthest east point in North America.

[image]
When at the cape, we were some 4000 miles from Colorado and 2500 miles from Ireland.

[image]
We traveled down the Avalon Peninsula.

[image]
Ferryland is an interesting historic town where excavations were going on to find it's history.. It was founded by Lord Baltimore in the 1620s. His son, the second lord Baltimore founded Baltimore MD where the weather was better. A little to the south is Renews which is so old that the Mayflower made a stop there.

[image]
Fishing boat at Ferryland.
[image]
Newfoundlanders love lawn decorations.

[image]
The country south of Ferryland on HWY 10 changes to a broad flat plane of treeless tundra that is the home of Caribou. Here lives the southern most Caribou herd in North America. Of course, we did not see any. There is some soil in this area that supports hay and livestock. Sheep and cows are seen braving the wind in this arctic landscape.

[image]
Near the south end of the peninsula, we stayed at Chance Cove Provincial Park. Finding it was a bit of a problem . This small sign was the only indication.

[image]
There were no established sites, just find a place that you like.

[image]
This wonderful sign was near our site.

[image]
It was a gloomy afternoon, but there we young men in wet suits offshore looking for a wave to ride.

[image]
We traveled around St. Mary’s bay down to Cape St. Mary’s Ecological Preserve

[image]
The bird Rocks were about a 3km walk where sheep frequented the trail. The exercise was good for legs in paralysis from travel.

[image]
We saw the Northern Gannets by the thousands finishing the raising of their young.

[image]
We camped just outside the Preserve at Gannet’s Nest Camp Ground. The wind blew all night at 30 to 40 knots. We were the only ones in the CG. The season for tourists was over. The owner was a fisherman who has furnished his life savings to the camp and restaurant venture. We wish him well, but the short season seems dream shattering. Even at the peak of the tourist season, I suspect the not many pass the intersection of HWY 100 and the Cape St. Mary’s road.

[image]
After taking Sarah to the airport at St. John's, we crossed "The Rock" to get the ferry at Channel-Port-aux Basques. this was our last night before the ferry.
We stayed at the Grand Codroy RV Park at Doyles, NF, which is 36 Km from the ferry. Our final morning in Newfoundland greeted us with a fine sunrise and mild winds. We headed south to Port aux Basques and soon felt the buffeting of high winds and light rain. As we bid adieu to dear old Newfoundland. We felt very pleased with the venture into this fascinating country.


Clattertruck
2008 SD F450 Pickup PSD 6.4L CC 4X4 DRW, Lariat Auto trans 4.30 LS, 2013 Lance TT 1885, Toyota 2014 Tundra Crew Max 5.7.


spacedoutbob

SF Bay Area

Senior Member

Joined: 07/20/2009

View Profile





Offline
Posted: 10/23/12 03:27pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Clattertruck, Newfoundland is one place on my bucket list. Thanks to your Great Trip Report and Photos, I feel like I have been there. Thanks again for posting.

Bob in Calif.


Good Sam Club Life Member


NCWriter

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 10/05/2011

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 10/23/12 03:57pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Enjoyed your photos! We were there this summer for a few weeks and loved it. You are so right that the villages aren't overrun with the beautiful people. Not a touristy place, just towns filled with friendly folks. I read someone else's thought that it reminded him of the 1950s in the US, a simpler time and way of life.


2013 Itasca Navion IQ 24G


jmtandem

western nevada

Senior Member

Joined: 01/18/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 10/23/12 04:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wonderful pictures! Thanks.


'05 Dodge Cummins 4x4 dually 3500 white quadcab auto long bed.

ticki2

NH

Senior Member

Joined: 07/09/2008

View Profile



Posted: 10/23/12 04:20pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Newfoundland for too long has eluded me for one reason or another . Your TR has inspired me to move it closer to the top . Thank you for that and the wonderful pictures and description .


'68 Avion C-11
'02 GMC DRW D/A flatbed

woodhog

NS

Senior Member

Joined: 08/06/2002

View Profile



Posted: 10/23/12 04:37pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the lovely pictures, this summer we spent 2 months in Newfoundland and Labrador.

If at all possible anyone with an RV should try to go there at least once. You will not be disappointed.


2004.5 Dodge 4x4 SRW Diesel, 245/70R19.5 Michelin XDS2, Bilstein Shocks
Torklift Stable loads, BD Steering Stabilizer Bar, Superchips "TOW" Programed,Rickson 19.5 wheels

2006 8.5 Northstar Arrow, 3 Batteries 200 Watts Solar,
12 Volt DC Fridge.

Tiger4x4RV

Inland Empire, Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/14/2007

View Profile



Posted: 10/23/12 04:40pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Your trip reports are always an inspiration. Thank you for the time and effort which you put into sharing your travels with us.


2006 Tiger CX 4x4, 8.1 L gas V-8, Allison 6-speed


silversand

Montreal

Senior Member

Joined: 09/12/2004

View Profile



Posted: 10/23/12 04:51pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Beautiful expedition!

I was in Newfoundland way back in the mid '80s. I didn't drive nearly the comprehensive route you had!

I'm archiving this one on my laptop for our future planned journey to Newfoundland.

Many thanks for this exceptional trip report!

Cheers,
Silversand-


Silver
2004 Chevy Silverado 2500HD 4x4 6.0L Ext/LB Tow Package 4L80E Michelin AT2s| Outfitter Caribou

Gunship Guy

Destin, FL

Senior Member

Joined: 08/09/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 10/23/12 05:01pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What a great trip!

I've flown in and out of St John's many, many times and just love that place. The people of NF always treated me and my crew like family.


2017 Weekend Warrior (by The RV Factory)
2013 Ram 3500 Longhorn LB DRW 4x4 Aisin 4.10


Previous:

2014.5 DRV Mobile Suites 41'
2006 DRV Mobile Suites 38'
Volvo 770

Clattertruck

Centennial Colorado

Senior Member

Joined: 06/19/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 10/23/12 05:23pm Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

silversand wrote:

Beautiful expedition!

I was in Newfoundland way back in the mid '80s. I didn't drive nearly the comprehensive route you had!

I'm archiving this one on my laptop for our future planned journey to Newfoundland.

Many thanks for this exceptional trip report!

Cheers,
Silversand-


Fyi we spent over a month and about 3200 miles. My post does not cover everything.

This Topic Is Closed  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Newfoundland by TC
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Truck Campers


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.