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 > 1968 Travel Queen Resto Mod - 10. Galley & Greatroom

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Dave Pete

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Posted: 12/13/14 05:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well not really irrelevant; info discovered here might help others even if I'm upgrading. But something I should mention is that there is a sliding metal door on the back of the hood that is meant to stop air drafts or large amounts of water and dust. Of course it isn't sealed and water or minor dust might get through. I suppose one could use sealant (caulking or weather stripping of some sort) to seal the three pieces together pretty good, isolating the internal wall segments. So if it was me and I wasn't doing a full rebuild and just wanted to attack this one area, I'd at least make sure the channel through the wall was sealed well to prevent structural water damage.


Lil' Queeny - 1968 Travel Queen 8' Resto-Mod TC
Tow-Mater - 1964 Roadrunner 15' Canned Ham Resto-Mod (for DD)
Teal Tripper - Mix of old and new (in vision stage for DS)
Fairweather June - 1957 Leisurehome 20' Park Model Resto-Mod
The Po' Boys - Just you wait

Dave Pete

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Posted: 12/13/14 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The Ventline link was informative. Two things I noticed.

One is that in one product there's a choice of vent covers, one being louvers like my original. Interesting that it's still an option when the hooded grills make so much sense.

Two is that on all five examples it appears the hole in the wall is going to be too low for my app. My original hood upper surface is only 1/4" below the cabinet (as positioned by the hood flange on the top of the metal unit). These all look like a larger distance.

Thanks for the link, I'll keep an evaluation going.

ticki2

NH

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Posted: 12/13/14 07:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My Avion has a similar exterior grill to the one in your picture but in addition there is a three sided cover that screws or rivets to the outside shell , the bottom being open . It looks something like the Ventline without the back flange that would go into the opening . It is also aluminum not plastic . One could probably make one without too much trouble . They were pretty common on older campers , a salvage yard may have one . I'l try to get a better picture if it's not too covered in snow.

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And yes the floor can get wet from the frig vent but in truth have only noticed it rarely .

* This post was edited 12/13/14 07:57am by ticki2 *


'68 Avion C-11
'02 GMC DRW D/A flatbed

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 12/13/14 08:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hmmm, definitely an option. Thanks!

ticki2

NH

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Posted: 12/13/14 11:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Here are a few pics , pretty simple .

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Look at that , one screw wasn't ss . They all have to be replaced anyway , ss is not good for aluminum .

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I have good luck finding older parts here
http://www.rvdoctorgeorge.com/

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/06/15 07:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Now that I had the front wall of the camper box in place I could work on the refrigerator cabinet; the same way as I had done back ago on the propane cabinet. So here we are back in 10-Galley and Greatroom - I guess because most of what is happening is refrigerator related. But there is great deal going on here.

Like the double duty being pulled out back, where the propane cabinet is also the bathroom sink vanity and counter top, the fridge is not "just a fridge" - no, it is here, perhaps more so than anywhere else in the camper, that we try and pull every cubic inch available into use.

From the interior side we have the fridge itself and because of the rounded sidewall, the fridge cannot be placed any higher than it is, so we made use of the space between the fridge top and the enclosed door-style cabinet above to use as a deep, but short shelf landing for whatever. We imagine maps, literature, books, laptop, travel guides, etc.

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And below, at least until a fridge replacement is necessary if ever, another open shelf this time for a couple pairs of shoes. Like at home where shoes come off upon entry, I expect our camper will be quite similar. Coming in? Lose the street shoes. Put on the slippers, camp shoes or just don socks or go barefoot. We'll figure out a good method for the on/off thing and perhaps outside storage of muddy boots.

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But how did we get there? And what next? Glad you asked.

Quite some time ago I began work on the fridge cabinet, while the front wall was still out and I could get to things for both planning and building. The fridge is designed for "zero" clearance on all sides except right above for the chimney stuff. And in order for the convective air flow to operate the fridge cooling correctly, the sides of the fridge have to be within a MINIMUM distance of the side walls in the cabinet, and that distance is a small fraction of an inch; what maybe 3/16" max? I forget - I saw it on another brand installation manual. So I started with the wall build-out on the left (common to the wall on the right of the range).

Here I found I had made a shelf cleat too short for the fridge wall. So that got replaced first.

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Notice the channel cut in the longer cleat for the propane line.

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And in place.

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Then I cut 3/4" insulation board and filled the cavities, cutting a groove for the propane line and conduit.

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Then covered it up.

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At this stage we took the fridge down off the high garage shelf and tried to slide it in place. It wasn't happening. The fridge hadn't very much lip to cover the rough opening, or to place mounting screws for that matter, so I was very exact on minimum sizing. As it turned out I had to increase height about 1/2" and width about 3/16". You might detect such increases in some of the photos hereafter.

The width was simply a matter of cutting more out of the face board, but the height required lessening the fridge shelf board thickness. I went from 3/4" to 1/4". Fortunately the fridge weight is right over the shelf supports. But the new 1/4" shelf front edge posed a problem for the 3/4" thick piece of trim board I needed to put on its front. You'll see in today's post how that worked.

To get a proper feel of what outside storage capability there would be, I temporarily installed the access opening frame, and a scrap board for the camper corner.

[image]

Originally I had planned in my head to leave ALL of the space under the fridge for outside storage. When I made the face board cuts I decided to reclaim that space for interior storage (shoe shelf). At this stage I decided to split the difference, so I put a pair of my big feet shoes in place and made a pencil mark. Then I rounded up to an even 13" and planned the back of the cabinet to be there. What that accomplishes is a slightly larger depth for outside storage, allowing a place for something like a coiled extension cord above an enclosed utilities (wiring) channel below. You see a scrap piece of plywood acting as that wall in the above photo.

[image]

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And, by cutting off the unnecessary back three inches of angle iron horizontal leg from the fridge (compare previous photos and next photo) and filing all edges and corners smooth, I could more easily access the area between the front wall of the camper, and the cabinet wall still to be built on the RIGHT side of the fridge (while standing inside facing the fridge). Believe it or not, that space will allow room for a full size ax and perhaps a small shovel (I picture a folding army shovel like I carry in Lil' Willy) resting on top of the fridge shelf just above the front wall utility channel area.

[image]

The back wall board of the shoe cabinet will give excellent support to the thin 1/4" fridge shelf, as does the shelf supports on either side. But again, the front edge is weak, and needs a 3/4" trim fastened to it's front - part of the original cabinetry that was cut out when I made the new rough opening. To get that on I started with a 1" strip of 1/2" plywood, glued and 1/2" stapled from the 1/4" surface into the 1/2" strip. Nice and strong.

[image]

Then I glued and nailed the 3/4" by 3/4" trim strip onto the new 3/4" edge. I used a 1 1/4" pneumatic finish nail for fastening it, but really, it is the glue that does all the holding. The nails and staples help yes, but they really just hold it tight until the glue dries. And it's not the glue that holds, it's the wood fibers gripping each other through the medium of the glue. If you can figure out how to make wood fibers grip themselves without use of glue, nails or staples, you will become rich!

Anyway, this is how the edge turned out.

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Oh and here's how the back wall board worked.

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I'll meet up with you all tomorrow morning in 7-Finishes & Finishing as we put paint on these pieces.

* This post was last edited 01/06/15 08:01am by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/14/15 06:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Getting the fridge cabinet built meant several times putting the fridge in place and checking things, then removing it to do the work. I don't think it's been in and out 10 times, but well over five. It was enough to become a routine.

The stand and shelf, and the fixed left cabinet wall, were important to complete first. Once I got those done, including the finish, then it was a matter of making a right side partition wall.

Of course the fridge is insulated so the cabinet walls don't necessarily need insulation, like how the cabinet was stuffed full of Styrofoam block upon removal of the original icebox. And it was important for me to recoup the storage spots when able. I built the right wall in such a way as to carry a full size ax. Even so it was quite a tight fit and in actuality, I'll probably carry a folding army shovel and a 3/4 size ax in that space.

I also wanted a nice tight cabinet, in both the fridge space, and in all the storage spaces. Therefore, along with primer and paint I am applying a good bead of caulking in all the corners and other seams. Anywhere I can reduce air and dust drafts will help.

As we use the camper, finding air leaks (such as the wide open flow between the interior bottom control area of the fridge and the back side lower open air vent, will become easier to control and mitigate if I know from the beginning that the cabinets and storage locations are sealed.

Here's the build...

Test fit fridge in place.

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Here's the back side. Note the angle iron horizontal leg on the far side has had about 3" cut off to allow easier access into the storage area.

[image]

These 1/8" panel pieces cover a 3/4" deep by about 2.5" wide channel for 110V and 12V wiring. It's possible I'll still run the galley sink grey water drain line through here (above the covers), but it may also run between the fridge and the range on the range side. The fresh water will all run on the interior to control freezing. The small space below the "ax shelf" can store medium size tools and objects, unless the grey line runs through there, or even with it.

[image]

Here is a test fit view of where the fridge cabinet right wall partition needs to be added.

[image]

This storage area will allow for small objects to be placed in this sort of tray, under the shore power cord(s). That tray is between the wiring channel on the outside and the shoe storage on the inside.

[image]

This was quite a gap to fill, as the wall piece was originally designed for the 3/4" fridge shelf board. Because I ended up needing to use 1/4" material I had to place some of the gap above and some below. It all got filled with caulking. Paint to follow.

[image]

And from the chimney (upper vent) the fridge appears thus...

[image]

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Here is the right wall partition, built out of 1/8" paneling as there is no need for structure here, just partition. This will be the fridge side...

[image]

And the narrow storage side...

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Here are 3/4" cleats, cut to size, pre-drilled and put in place. These will keep the partition in a nice, secure position, but with enough room for the fridge to slide in and out as easily. Most of the cleats were fastened with screws through the cleat and into the surface material, except on the 1/4" shelf where shorter screws were driven from below into the cleat.

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And with the partition in place. I used pneumatic 3/4" staples for fastening the panel to the cleats.

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Here are some shots of how the storage space works out with the partition and fridge in place.

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That's a 50' cord. For a 15-20 Amp Input I think I could easily fit a 100' cord in here. I also have a 10 footer (blue) for easy carry and hookup if I feel two cords of different lengths are useful to have on board. Incidentally, the blue cords are "cold weather" cords. They stay flexible in sub-zero temperatures; we picked ours up while living in Fairbanks, AK. They sell them in the lower 48, but they are EVERYWHERE in Fairbanks.

And these next photos show the caulking treatment, paint to follow. It's important to me to not only have finished (painted) utility service areas, but to also have dust, water and air sealed out as much as possible. Again, that will aid in future fine-tuning of draft areas, not to mention keep things as free from dirt as possible. I want to treat the storage areas themselves, as tool-boxes.

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When push comes to shove, all these compartments can have little fasteners and straps and loops and hooks, etc. fastened easily into the solid wood corners and surfaces for all kinds of small tools, etc. As on a small boat, this camper will require a place for everything, and everything in it's place.

* This post was edited 01/14/15 09:41am by Dave Pete *

ticki2

NH

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Posted: 01/14/15 08:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You are certainly getting creative with the nooks and crannies , always useful . It seems that in the ax and shovel compartment the wall above the bed area will not be insulated and have cold air coming up from the fridge bottom vent . Below the bed doesn't matter as it is an exterior wall .

I found a lot of cold air coming in around the fridge and blocked both sides and bottom with insulation . I left the burner area out so it used outside air .

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/14/15 09:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good plans ticki. And yes cold bedroom wall. If that is too drastic I'll do more insulating and less storage. But consider, it is a 3/4" wall (plywood) or maybe 7/8" and much of the camper (wings, box walls, etc.) is 1/2" plywood. There will be other cold spots. I intend to insulate where possible, and use radiant heat source otherwise. As long as a heater is enough, and the cubic footage is small enough, I should have enough propane. [emoticon] and with the heater I have some open ventilation anyway (catalytic).

* This post was edited 01/14/15 09:45am by Dave Pete *

Dave Pete

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Posted: 02/06/15 06:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One of the oldest features in a camper just HAS to be a dinette table. And of course it HAS to have always been convertible to make up a bed.

Of course mine is no different and the conversion uses a pedestal. I've never thought much about it until now but my parts camper came with an original style pedestal complete with floor and table flanges.

I'll show these in more detail further down the road, but suffice to say for now, the original is MUCH stouter than modern day pedestals. And the original has a lever close to the table that you use to easily pop the table off the tube.

The original tube and table flange were missing from Lil' Queenie, but the floor flange was still there so I had two to choose from. I took the flanges apart and used the best pieces. (The silver ring applies to the table flange - I think). Err no, I think it goes around the raised floor board, yeah that's it - the raised floor board! I think.

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After sanding up the best base flange I primed and painted.

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Then assembled and installed.

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The front and rear screws are #10 by 1.5" and go into the plywood and the 2x2 framing. The other holes are just in the 1/2" plywood as original and are #10 by 1", so they're getting some grab in the insulation (just kidding).

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