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 > 1968 Travel Queen Resto Mod - 10. Galley & Greatroom

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Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 01/08/16 06:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It's been a number of months since I've made a post. For a good deal of that time Lil' Queeny hasn't been worked on. But there have been quite a number of projects and other events occurring, as well as reorganizing my shop and even here recently, conducting quite a lot of work on Lil' Queeny.

Today I restart the posts, although I seriously doubt they'll become a daily routine like they were in the past. Even so, there are things to let you in on.

While reorganizing the shop, I decided to finally do something with the stack of exterior vinyl house siding I purchased to make the interior outside-corner trim pieces (color and vinyl to match the original interior trim). You may recall a post way back ago that described those intentions.

Today I'll show how I cut out what I needed and to prep the rest for discard, or for some other use.

Here's a picture of one of the four locations with original outside corner that was warped, discolored or otherwise damaged...

[image]

And here is the new replacement piece I cut from the house siding...

[image]

I still need to install the pieces, which I plan to do with the same black screw and brass upholstery washer combo as used elsewhere in the camper.

The need is to cover about 1" on the one surface and as little as 1/8" plus on the other. I think I cut the trim to about 1.25" by 1/4". Here's how I did it.

I starting with a small-tooth finish blade on the table saw, and a slow feed to avoid chipping. Then I cut to length and ripped the runs.

[image]

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Here is a close profile...

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Here's the scrap. I saved most of it in case I find some other use for it.

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And here are my pieces for the four interior locations, plus some extra.

[image]

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Lil' Queeny - 1968 Travel Queen 8' Resto-Mod TC
Tow-Mater - 1964 Roadrunner 15' Canned Ham Resto-Mod (for DD)
Teal Tripper - Mix of old and new (in vision stage for DS)
Fairweather June - 1957 Leisurehome 20' Park Model Resto-Mod
The Po' Boys - Just you wait

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 06/23/16 05:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

edit

* This post was edited 09/19/17 04:37pm by Dave Pete *

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 01/03/17 04:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hey Gang! Happy New Year!

What a past 6 months, what a past year! So many projects came up.

My elderly mother just went back to my sister's after being here for almost 3 months. And that keeps you out of the shop more than you'd think!

Got that plow set-up done on Lil' Willy!

Still have to finish up Lil' Spen before I get back to work on Lil' Queeny. But that's getting close. Some paint and then it's back outside so I have room to work on the camper.

And the camper is covered with dust. Was working on the exterior paint and a little more on the door aluminum, if you recall.

But today I'm here in Galley and Greatroom because even though it might have worked in The Night Chamber, this is where upholstery will really be visible.

I got me a new toy.

See, of the two shops in town who do upholstery work, one never returns calls. I think they went kinda semi-retired. Don't blame 'em.

The other is always too busy and too pricey. He has too much work. Lil' Queeny is special enough that I didn't want just ANY upholstery. No - something special was needed.

And it's not as if that's my only upholstery job! No sir! There's the previous top on Lil' Willy that got torn and needs to be made into a Bikini Top now. There's the whole pop-up tent trailer idea I have for Lil' Spen. And any other project that comes up requiring heavier fabric and stitching. According to my buddy who makes canvas Jeep tops a steel geared walking foot commercial machine was required.

So I got me a 1954 Singer 111W155.

[image]

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Isn't that just too cool? Now I just have to learn to sew. [emoticon]

But I promise, while not necessarily upholstery work, I'm gonna do some actual work on Lil' Queeny within a month's time. And then I'll be back heavy into finishing her up this season.

* This post was edited 09/19/17 04:41pm by Dave Pete *

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 01/20/17 06:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A recent previous post here shows where I was making "outside corner" molding for the camper interior. Trying to mimic what was originally installed, but no longer available. I had ripped lengths of vinyl household siding to obtain outside corner, which I'll fasten with the black screw, brass upholstery washer method used elsewhere in the interior.

But before I could install it in the four locations it belongs, I needed to complete a wall surface in one of those places - the stove top back and side coverings - in tile. Okay, okay now, let's just hold off on judgements. [emoticon]

But before I could do tile work (which I also need done before counter, which is also ready to work on), I had to get some work done on both the uneven mating of where the two wood surfaces meet at that corner, as well as decide definitively on the range vent opening. Let's work out the latter today.

The kids gave me their 1995 (I think) Skamper camper. It came with a truck he had bought for the wheels and tires and other stuff which he fixed with this and that and sold - which netted him profit. The camper structure is more work than he or I wanted, so I'm using it for a shed and for spare parts.

One of the parts is this Ventline Range hood with fan/light. Might it work well in Lil' Queeny? I had to find out.

Here you see it side by side with the little avocado colored manual unit that came originally. Note the differences in dimension.

[image]

The newer is about 1/2" wider. Under cabinet depths are different, smaller guy is for a deeper cabinet, newer guy is a shallower cabinet, but with a flare that "sticks out into the room" further.

[image]

The newer unit is also taller, making it closer to whatever you have on the stove top. And if you're a tall cook - which we are, that makes you have to bend further and work harder to put your fork up in the pan.

I sort of test fit the bigger unit and it really felt cramped in the galley. But what about fitting the fan/light box to the original hood?

[image]

Hmmmm. Well, let's see how it feels in the camper!

[image]

Yeah - I don't know. Naw!

Let's stick with manual. The original unit works on convection. Hot over the stove - open the (inside available) sliding vent door and let the heat (and moisture) escape. Need more than that? Open a window, or turn on the Fantastic fan. Gotta keep in mind her small size. Can't be dressing Lil' Queeny up with too much costume, if you know what I mean.

Besides, look at the difference in vent openings! That would require structural modification, and I already closed out that chapter. [emoticon]

[image]

I also noticed the method for telescoping exterior/interior vent parts into one another were of the exact same design, old and newer. Plus the newer would require a plastic vent cover (trying to avoid too much of that when able). I think I have my exterior vent designs already figured out. No big deal.

Incidentally, this is the extra range. Might it work best?

[image]

Perhaps, but we like this one better.

[image]

And the fridge? Well the parts camper has this cool little 4 cubic foot Dometic. Nice unit.

[image]

Might work well in future as a spare or replacement, or an outright re-sale. Because we just think we want to keep the original era Hadco 410, shown upside down in this shot.

[image]

And that grey painted metal band around the outside fridge perimeter has need for some attention. Some rust, paint pulled from the stuck fridge door seal. This is part of the fridge that when installed, will be quite visible. Yeah. Needs attention.

[image]

And DW doesn't like the avocado color on the range vent, even IF the range is avocado. I can't disagree. One is just paint, while the other is appliance epoxy (I suppose). Quite different. So I pulled the chrome band off the vent in prep for some attention on it too.

[image]

And the other old Travel Queen parts camper also gave up a folding range cover in chrome plating. But it hadn't been treated well and was quite pitted.

[image]

DW wanted to use the range cover too, but had her own ideas on finishes.

Maybe we can talk about that tomorrow in Finishes & Finishing.

* This post was last edited 09/19/17 04:53pm by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 01/22/17 07:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another job needing done before applying tile to the stove side wall, was to flush up the surface.

The fridge cabinet face-board was jutting out further than the stove side wall, creating an angle on the last row of tiles at that corner. Visually awkward, not to mention poor adhesion.

I considered removing the excess material with a belt-sander (pretty messy), a sabre or jig-saw (hard to get a good right angle) and some various other ideas. I settled on my Grandpa's plane, shown in the photos. The last time I used it was to shave a 2x4 in a bathroom wall that was bowed into the room before sheetrock (and tile) went up. What an awesome tool these are.

So I got the edge smoothed and the mess was in the form of pretty big shavings, easily picked up with the shop-vac. I forgot to take pictures until after cleanup.

[image]

[image]

[image]



Alright, so let's get that tile up. This surface was the hardest of the two. So many edges to consider and rounded edges in some spots. Marking out in pencil was the last step after deciding where best to place cut tiles (which can be a bit jagged when nipped). But here's the main portions up, after only a few cut pieces placed.

[image]

Then a completed surface.

[image]

And the back wall.

[image]

The next morning I found one loose tile that got re-done. And that lower edge of the vent hole also received some cut tiles as I discovered it was visible below the vent hood.

It's all ready for grout now, but I did some other stuff while adhesive dried. I'll cover that over the next few days before attempting grout.

* This post was last edited 09/19/17 05:00pm by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/23/17 07:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Now originally there were multiple "green tone items" in the camper: the avocado green range and vent hood, the upholstered board across the bunk opening to cover the edge of the mattress, the translucent plastic decorative lens in the archway wall - what else?

Well - probably some of the original cushions, not that we had any of those. But I've seen other, more complete Travel Queens that would indicate such.

Now, with the vent hood color changed, and new colors, materials and fabrics kind of already picked out in our heads, the green was getting sparce. Not that that's a bad thing, but rather just a fact. Would the single green avocado range look okay, all on it's lonesome? You see where I'm going right?

Wrong!

No, we are not planning to paint the range after all. No, we are not planning to replace the range.

But, that one recent evening as we sat out in Lil' Queeny marveling and planning with our beer (that's when we get some of our best ideas), I left and went back over to the supply shelf and pulled down the "upholstered board across the bunk" and the "plastic archway wall lens" and held them up for DW. And she got that little look of disgust cross her countenance, like she does sometimes, and in my mind I said "fine".

Then, like only one beer later, she surprised me and said, "you know, they're in such good original condition, and it's not like they're permanent. We could always replace them if they don't grow on us. And they are part of Lil' Queeny and carry her energy". And I'm going, "yeah".

I'm really a fan of the range (and so is she, especially with that cute little window in the oven door), and I really think the single green is wrong. There needs to be more green balanced throughout the camper a little. And while in close proximity the green tones are not exact matches, they are pretty close, and I think well chosen originally. So that's what we'll do.

Let's start with the retainer board.

[image]

Great original condition, and the fabric still so flexible, no tears. Kind of amazing when you think about it.

[image]

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Hey look - they got the fridge in place!

[image]

And look at the "eyeballing" again on the screw holes! Just like the exterior running lights, "well, that looks good - naw, I don't need a tape measure - just slows me down". I'm going to try and fix that here in a minute.

[image]

Now, the little window. It was originally held on the back side of the wall with mirror clips. And the edge was left unfinished. When I took it down, I noted that, and didn't really like the unfinished look. What to do?

So I ran over to the home center - I needed some 2" screws anyway - and looked for whatever they might have in "banding".

These are "close-out" lengths of edge banding used for those plastic ceiling panels made to look like a tin ceiling? Yeah, my color choice was on close-out! [emoticon] 16 cents a piece, down from - what does that sticker say - $1.69?

Brittle plastic, gotta be careful cutting. I used a fine tooth jamb saw.

[image]

[image]

And the back side (front side).

[image]

And now installed, here's the back side (front side).

[image]

And the front side (back side).

[image]

And all together now.

[image]

Oh yeah, that's what I'm talking about baby!

Okay, let's talk about that blue masking tape. Now see the original two screw holes to the left are just over 20" from each other. The two screws in the middle are 18.5" apart. And the two on the right side are almost 17". See how easy it is for the eye to pick up anomalies? I think that's an evolved thing about pro-creation, but I digress.

I tried a few ideas, but settled on a best choice balance of new screws at the blue tape locations. I have it done now, and the screw head depths adjusted for a best look, but didn't get pictures. Onward!

* This post was last edited 09/20/17 04:41am by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/25/17 06:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Back in September of 2015, I made the first cuts on the countertop board.

First Cuts Countertop

I had also been using spacer boards to position the range and sink like this, even previous to that - March 2015.

[image]

Well, no time like the present. Let's finish that build now.

I got the countertop board placed, and pencil marks drawn on the underside. I also located where I wanted the cross boards, to act in various tasks, most importantly to prevent the edge-glued countertop boards from breaking their edge bonds. These also needed to clear obstructions, and act as locations for fastening the counter top to the cabinetry.

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Then after measuring again (more than twice), I cut.

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And test fit.

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Then I fine-tune cut the range cutout, sized and cut out the dinette table and breadboard, made the support pieces for those and glued and stapled and finish-nailed and wood-filled and sanded - starting with 60 grit and finishing up with 220. It was time for stain.

[image]

[image]

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I'll show those stained and polyurethaned pictures over in Chapter 7. Finishes & Finishing. As of now the stain is on, but the poly will take a few days. Maybe I'll grout back splash in between poly coats.

* This post was last edited 09/20/17 04:57am by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

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Posted: 01/30/17 06:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Upon completion of the table and countertop finish, it was time to install. The first piece to go in was the countertop.

[image]

To the right of the range cutout, I fastened the counter with three screws into the fridge cabinet wall.

[image]

Along the back wall were three fastening locations.

[image]

Along the front edge, one here above the drawer,

[image]

and one above the front of the breadboard at the far end.

[image]

There were two more holes at mid and rear, along that same board, but I now found them unnecessary. There will also be 1 to 3 across the front edge of the sink, in conjunction with the sink-to-counter fasteners. That's because the front sink cutout is flush with the inside face of the cabinet - to allow enough space at the rear for the faucet - and that fact prevented a fastening cleat.

Close-ups of the finished wood grain.

[image]

[image]

Then it was on to the table. I mounted the post hardware to the bottom of it,

[image]

and put it in place.

[image]

Of course it can also turn this direction.

[image]

In the normal position, there is just enough room to allow this cabinet access lid to raise - I just got a hinge on it a few days ago.

[image]

It can open fully and flat like this,

[image]

Or, if you turn the table a bit, it can be held up out of the way.

[image]

When making up a bed here, or when we are ready to lounge, the table goes down into the bed position,

[image]

and rests on these boards made from excess countertop/table aspen wood board, finished in the same cream coloring for contrast, and fastened with the same black screw/brass washer combo being used throughout the camper interior.

[image]

[image]

In fact, I had mentioned I added the extra screws to the green cushioned retainer board. Here's how that turned out.

[image]

I had also planned to hinge the center access cover here, but instead, prefer to simply lift all three of these out when needed. The center one (accessed routinely for a waste container) can simply be lifted in front with the little leather tab, as if it were hinged, but also removed completely when necessary. No hinge desired.

[image]

* This post was last edited 09/20/17 05:12am by Dave Pete *   View edit history

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 01/31/17 06:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lately I've been pleased to be able to start "putting up stuff" that's been laying around, just waiting, for quite a while, things like: the table and counter boards, the table post, the bunk cushion board and plastic window, even the fridge!

Soon, once the exterior paint arrives, and I get it applied, additional things will change from "stored" to "installed", like: windows, water-fills, etc. The storage areas will really begin to clear out, and my garage will be getting back closer and closer to normal. That's pretty exciting to me.

Another thing I "got put-up", which has been laying around inside the camper now for a long time, and even before than that, when it was vinyl home-siding, laying on the floor under one camper wing for an even longer time, is the interior "outside corner" trim/molding I made and described in this thread sometime back.

Here is one length of that on the bench, getting measured and pre-drilled for the decorative screw treatment installation.

[image]

And here it is installed on the first outside corner to greet you as you look into the camper, running vertically down to the floor from the rounded corner of the countertop. Also note the shorter, thin cream-colored edge on the opposing corner of that same lower cabinet. That's another one.

[image]

And here are those same two corners from the other direction. Note the shorter one was cut narrower, to fit the different application style of that wood edge.

[image]

Now this view shows the lower part of the longest trim molding, which is on the bathroom cabinet corner.

[image]

And the upper reaches.

[image]

You might also see in the above photo, the trim board between the edge of the tiled back-splash, and the wood paneled wall. Here is a better picture of it.

[image]

And a close-up from the other direction. This is some left over from a treatment in our home.

[image]

And one final cabinet, here between the overhead bunk and the galley on the fridge cabinet face right-side corner.

[image]

And the left side corner to cap the tiled edge.

[image]

Yeah. I noticed the missing screw too. [emoticon] The hole is drilled, but I guess I was in a hurry.

* This post was edited 09/20/17 05:20am by Dave Pete *

Dave Pete

Wyoming

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Posted: 02/01/17 07:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In order to hold the breadboard from sliding out and falling while underway, and to provide a method for placing sink hold-down clips along the front edge of the sink and counter top (due to it's tight spacing caused by shifting the sink forward and making room for the faucet behind), I had to again remove the counter top.

Done.

Let's start with the breadboard. It is poly finished on one side (for food prep - same as on the counter) and unfinished on it's reverse (for cutting - it will get some food grade oiling). In other words, the board needs to be able to flip. But it also needs to hold in place while underway. I discovered it could receive a simple barbed "hold-close" just like all the other pop off cabinet drawer fronts. And I had an extra wood piece and several pairs of hardware. I did need to add a simply 1/8" thick piece of wood paneling behind the wood block to obtain proper positioning. The rest was basic install.

[image]

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This finished paneling board acts as a slide between itself and the breadboard bottom surface, keeping the breadboard from falling and angling down, and at the same time, protecting the top Styrofoam of the water heater.

[image]

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With the countertop back in place, you can see into the breadboard slot from the cabinet face. Note the sliding board at bottom of the slot, and the two white primed "runners" above the slot. Those runners keep the breadboard flat in the other direction, and at the far ends you can see the small fastening cleats with the mounting screws.

[image]

And here is a side view.

[image]

Because the breadboard is "flippable" that creates a danger of pulling it out too far and having it fall. If we think in terms of a "square" size usable area, I think we'll be okay.

[image]

And the unfinished side.

[image]

The sink install was a little difficult - on that front edge. The clips were easy-peasy when used as designed. I found it surprising how the slightest distance out of "design" created trouble.

But the vision started this way.

I used a router to cut this in three spots, pre-chosen based on sink examination. The center spot was between basins, quite of bit of space. In hind-sight, I should have placed the two ends (in the front) a little further outboard of the sink, just to obtain space between the basin corners and the clip screws. You'll see in a minute.

[image]

And a "repair strap" only 1/16" thick. Okay, with the routed mortise, its bottom surface was closer to 3/32" further from the sink lip than was the countertop bottom surface. But I was trying to hold down the sink, AND fasten the countertop down against the cabinet face.

[image]

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This picture shows what an awesome fit were the clips on a standard 3/4" countertop thickness. But add that extra 3/32" at the front and LOOK OUT! I really fought those two front outer clips!

[image]

I also discovered the "outer" positioning of the clips helped hold the sink upper edge down good, especially at the corners. Too much further inboard on a given side and the corners were much less tight against the countertop surface. The long edges sat just fine regardless.

This final picture shows the three clips on the front edge. I actually had to cut the far screw shorter to get the clip on and access with a nut driver! Crazy.

[image]

And note the straighter install of the middle clip screw. I cannot explain that. These front outer two clips were a real bear. The middle one was easy, and it had the most room for access, even though it didn't require it as much as the other two. Again, I can't explain it.

Also, I first tried plumbers putty, but it was too stiff and nowhere for the excess to spread out and it kept the sink too high for ANY of the clips to work. So I removed the putty and ran a bead of kitchen/bath sealer and then cleaned that all up once done.

Didn't get pictures from above, but today I'll install the faucet and we'll show the whole thing.

* This post was last edited 09/20/17 05:35am by Dave Pete *   View edit history

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