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tenbear

Northern Vermont, USA

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Posted: 02/07/15 06:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chrazyman wrote:

I'm not an electrician. Does the 3A 14V not matter? The one on eBay is different. Thanks for everyone's help.


I have used the AC switches on DC and they have worked just fine. I don't know what they do differently for a 12v DC switch but I haven't found it to matter.


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wa8yxm

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Posted: 02/07/15 07:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Depending on the size and if you want the markings or not....

I recently replaced the light switch for the hood over my stove.. I got the new switch at Pep Boys Slightly different color and has a light inside it I could have conected had I wished (and may still do) but they had the switch.

Electroics parts stores (NOT Radio Shack, which used to be one but they phased out the profit making parts of the business and are not doing well i bankruptcy) but someplace that caters to Industry.


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myredracer

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Posted: 02/07/15 07:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you have an independent RV repair shop nearby, I would take the switch there and they can possibly match it up out of a parts catalogue. Hallsville looks to be a small town so don't know if you have an RV shop nearby?

Maybe find a good electronics shop somewhere that sells all things to do with electronics. We have one here that is way better than a Radio Shack and carries a huge range of parts and components. You could possibly measure the switch and and send that to an electronics store like this along with some pics and maybe they can come up with something. It's very likely to be an industry standard dimension.

Another manufacturer of RV switches is American Technology.

Or... Just replace the entire light fixture c/w switch?





wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

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Posted: 02/07/15 01:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

myredracer wrote:

If you have an independent RV repair shop nearby, I would take the switch there and they can possibly match it up out of a parts catalogue. Hallsville looks to be a small town so don't know if you have an RV shop nearby?

Maybe find a good electronics shop somewhere that sells all things to do with electronics. We have one here that is way better than a Radio Shack and carries a huge range of parts and components. You could possibly measure the switch and and send that to an electronics store like this along with some pics and maybe they can come up with something. It's very likely to be an industry standard dimension.

Another manufacturer of RV switches is American Technology.

Or... Just replace the entire light fixture c/w switch?


Or just buy the switch from Digikey online. It's only 85 or 98 cents, depending upon the color.

westend

Shorewood, MN

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Posted: 02/07/15 08:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wnjj wrote:

myredracer wrote:

If you have an independent RV repair shop nearby, I would take the switch there and they can possibly match it up out of a parts catalogue. Hallsville looks to be a small town so don't know if you have an RV shop nearby?

Maybe find a good electronics shop somewhere that sells all things to do with electronics. We have one here that is way better than a Radio Shack and carries a huge range of parts and components. You could possibly measure the switch and and send that to an electronics store like this along with some pics and maybe they can come up with something. It's very likely to be an industry standard dimension.

Another manufacturer of RV switches is American Technology.

Or... Just replace the entire light fixture c/w switch?


Or just buy the switch from Digikey online. It's only 85 or 98 cents, depending upon the color.

Best advice so far. You could also send me $1 and I'll mail you one but I only have them in black. Digikey will send you the switch via USPS, that saves considerably on shipping. I'm in MN as is their Northern distro center. Parts ordered on Monday arrive by Weds.


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Bobbo

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Posted: 02/07/15 09:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tenbear wrote:

I have used the AC switches on DC and they have worked just fine. I don't know what they do differently for a 12v DC switch but I haven't found it to matter.

It MAY work fine. It may not, at least for long.

DC arcs a lot longer and a lot hotter than AC when you break the connection. If the switch is not made for the longer/hotter arc, it can burn the contacts. You won't see the problem immediately, but it MAY lead to premature failure.

AC is 60 hertz, which means that the power stops completely 120 times a second as its direction reverses. That is why its arc is shorter, and therefore cooler. DC never stops until the switch completely breaks the contact, and that is not when the contacts separate. It is when the arc that occurs as the contacts are separating stops.

An example in my personal experience: This is not from AC vs DC but from using a switch on a circuit with higher voltage than it was rated for.

I had an electric fence around a garden pond to keep my dogs out of it. DW liked to work in her pond so I put a switch by the pond that broke the connection on the fence wire. It did not turn off the fence pulser. I originally had a switch rated for that voltage. Over time (outside in the weather) the switch finally broke. I went to a big box store and bought a cheap 120v/15amp light switch and wired that one in. Imagine DW's surprise the next time she went out, turned off that new switch, and touched the fence. The voltage was high enough to arc across the open contacts continuously. The voltage to the fence was NOT interrupted. She had words for me.

The same type of thing CAN happen with an AC rated switch on a DC circuit.

* This post was edited 02/07/15 09:35pm by Bobbo *


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tenbear

Northern Vermont, USA

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Posted: 02/08/15 05:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bobbo wrote:

tenbear wrote:

I have used the AC switches on DC and they have worked just fine. I don't know what they do differently for a 12v DC switch but I haven't found it to matter.

It MAY work fine. It may not, at least for long.

DC arcs a lot longer and a lot hotter than AC when you break the connection. If the switch is not made for the longer/hotter arc, it can burn the contacts. You won't see the problem immediately, but it MAY lead to premature failure.

AC is 60 hertz, which means that the power stops completely 120 times a second as its direction reverses. That is why its arc is shorter, and therefore cooler. DC never stops until the switch completely breaks the contact, and that is not when the contacts separate. It is when the arc that occurs as the contacts are separating stops.

An example in my personal experience: This is not from AC vs DC but from using a switch on a circuit with higher voltage than it was rated for.

I had an electric fence around a garden pond to keep my dogs out of it. DW liked to work in her pond so I put a switch by the pond that broke the connection on the fence wire. It did not turn off the fence pulser. I originally had a switch rated for that voltage. Over time (outside in the weather) the switch finally broke. I went to a big box store and bought a cheap 120v/15amp light switch and wired that one in. Imagine DW's surprise the next time she went out, turned off that new switch, and touched the fence. The voltage was high enough to arc across the open contacts continuously. The voltage to the fence was NOT interrupted. She had words for me.

The same type of thing CAN happen with an AC rated switch on a DC circuit.

You are right Bobbo, but we are talking about switching a meter, only a few milliamps at most. I don't think there will be much arcing.

Bobbo

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Posted: 02/08/15 08:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tenbear wrote:

You are right Bobbo, but we are talking about switching a meter, only a few milliamps at most. I don't think there will be much arcing.


He is not switching a meter with a few milliamps. It is an overhead light that could be 2 to 4 amps. According to www.bulbs.com an 1156 bulb is 26.9 watts at 12.8v. That divides out to right at 2 amps per bulb.

I used words like "can", "may" and "could" for a reason. In some applications, it really won't matter, but in others it really could. If the person making the substitution doesn't understand the possiblities, he may make a substitution in a place where it will matter.

I never said "don't do it", I merely educated as to the issues so he can make an informed decision. I did tell him that "I" would pass on the AC rated switch, because DC rated switches are available.

Also, a properly rated DC switch is little more expensive, if any at all. It just takes a little more looking. I know, I bought a spare ShurFlo water pump and wired it to pump water from 5 gallon totes into my freshwater tank. I put a 14v DC rated switch on the wire I use to power it. It was no more expensive than the AC switches I found everywhere, but it did take a little more looking to find it.

tenbear

Northern Vermont, USA

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Posted: 02/08/15 02:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Sorry, got confused with another thread I am following. [emoticon]

Better to get a DC rated switch.

Mathman80

usa

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Posted: 06/10/17 03:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you can wait a couple of weeks to get them (from China), I just got 5 for $1.98 and ship free on ebay. Search for "5PCS White ON/OFF 2 Position SPST Boat Rocker Switch 6A/250V 10A/125V AC". Presently the link is "http://www.ebay.com/itm/232274699192".

These fit perfectly and you can't beat the price!

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