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Topic: Dual Rear Tire Valve Stems?

Posted By: TwoPines on 11/18/15 08:23am

Looking for suggestions about options for adding air valve stem adapters on dual rear wheels? Bought a Jayco E-350 Class C with 225/75 16" tires a few months back and while winterizing noticed that the valve stems on the dual rear wheels are located between the two tires. So, unless I dismount the outer tire, I can't check tire pressure on either tire, nor can I add air if needed. Are there types of adapters preferred or are there replacement stems or what options are there? I would rather have an idea about what I need before going to the tire shop for a fix.

Thanks in advance.


Posted By: IAMICHABOD on 11/18/15 08:48am

What is needed is a extended valve stem that will let you quickly check your tire pressure. They add no extra weight like the Extenders would and balancing is no problem.
The best on the market,that are the original,are Tire Man any others are Knock offs.

Chuck is the original designer of these an he has been around for years. If you have any questions just give him a call, he is always happy to help.

The kit looks like This it is for all 6 wheels,they also come with flow-thru valve caps so you don't even need to take then off to check the pressure.

Here is a list of all the products he sells.


2006 TIOGA 26Q CHEVY 6.0 WORKHORSE VORTEC
Former El Monte RV Rental

Buying A Rental Class C



Posted By: MobileBasset on 11/18/15 08:50am

If you go to a commercial trucking tire center they can make you custom brass valve extenders for a reasonable price. Or you can go to one of the online sources and get the same thing for an exhorbitant price.


MobileBasset
2014 Itasca Spirit 25B on Chevy Express 3500 chassis
Daisy and Hank the Basset Hounds



Posted By: DouglasC on 11/18/15 08:51am

The pressure of the outside tire can be checked with a proper gauge where you can reach in and then pull back on the gauge to get a reading - - but the inside dual will need an extender. I have always used extenders and have had them installed by a tire store or by my mechanic. They can be problematic and will wear and leak over time. I just had mine replaced after about 5 years in service due to leaking.


Doug
2006 Jayco Greyhawk Model 27DS
Towing 2019 Ford Fusion Energi with Brake Buddy



Posted By: Bordercollie on 11/18/15 09:20am

Having solid metal custom formed valve stems also installed on front wheels is best for easy tire pressure checking and filling with beauty discs installed, no need for special chuck or gymnastics trying to make gas station tire chuck seal properly and not let your air out. Cheap screw on valve extenders are not reliable and can cause tires to lose pressure and fail with RV underside damage or possible loss of control. This subject should be a "sticky" on this forum.


Posted By: DrewE on 11/18/15 09:28am

You do need a dually tire gauge and likewise a dually inflation chuck. These have a sort of angled head on the end, with one port back at an angle (to get to the outer tire) and one forward on the end (for the inner tire). I find the style with the end port straight with the stem, rather than angled, is much more convenient.

With one of these and short valve extenders (1" or so) you should be able to check and air up the tires with only moderate hassle. The fancy extenders are nice, but you can get simple short airless ones that generally work fine too. Make sure your valve stems have a metal shank (as is usual for duallys) or are all metal; rubber valve stems with extenders tend not to last very well.

Dually tires can be rather a pain, truth be told. Ford's love for wheels with lots of tiny access holes doesn't help matters any.






Posted By: kalynzoo on 11/18/15 10:12am

I would go to a Truck tire center and have them mount solid stem extensions. They cost a bit more but it is a one time expense. I used the steel flex extensions for many years on many motorhomes. Twice over the many years I had gradual deflation due to wear on the stems. That is not to say the flex stems were bad, rather I did not check them regularly. I have gone for solid stems, not the extenders mounted in the tires.


Posted By: OFDPOS on 11/18/15 10:15am

Yep learned the rookie way myself. Bought a used MH and the salesguy pointed out "it even has the valve extenders for easy air checks"
Little did I realize all the wheels had rubber valve stems and the "extenders" were those cheap braided ones you see at the local autoparts stores and CW.

We were on a trip back East pulled off the FW into a little town to fuel up. I always do a walk around and even with my bad hearing I heard a hiss coming from the rear duals , bent down and sure enough the braided extender had the "rubber" valvestem tweeked over to the side and it had started to tear the rubber valvestem and was leaking air.
Found a Firestone truck tire shop a few blocks away and had them put metal valve stems on.
They didn't have any of the longer brass ones like mentioned above so had to put the braided extender ones back on.

Next up sold and bought another new to us MH, pulled another rookie stunt, when I had new tires put on I had them put all metal valve stems on,, on another post here I saw someone post up about the metal extenders (not the braided type) so I ordered up them... Yep another rookie mistake.
Being on a fixed income I didn't want to pay the money for the Tire Man ones..
Should of done it... One of the extenders I have to sit there and in about 5 minutes I can get just about 10 lbs of air pressure put in the one tire ;(
Read the post on tire pressure vs weight of MH and was adjusting the pressures.
Didn't like the ride so went back to the pressures I had ....

Spend the money and get the Tire Man ones !! In the long run IT IS WORTH IT ...


Posted By: j-d on 11/18/15 11:18am

Tire Man is fine, so is Dually Valve aka BORG.

I found BORG first and have been completely satisfied. Excellent quality, no install issues, and great personal service from Bill FalkenBORG when I (NO fault of the product) ruined an Inner Valve and he rushed me a no-charge replacement.

Just get SOMETHING that:

1. Is Solid Metal

2. Extends to where you can use ANY Air Gauge, ANY Air Chuck

3. Only involves ONE joint, ONE Valve Core

Both products referenced here accomplish all three. You'll go from a miserable tire checking job every few weeks to an easy job every several months. I couldn't believe how much air gets lost with rubber valves, screw-on extenders, etc.

Some kits come with Air-Through Caps. I got six and found the two on the front make ordinary metal stems accessible with our wheel simulators. So I can check all tires with any gauge/chuck and it takes only minutes. I add air only a couple times a year.

If you can outfit your wheels less expensively than BORG or TM, Fine. More Power to You. Just get SOMETHING that does 1-2-3 above, no compromise. Life it too short for tire issues that are SO easily avoided.


If God's Your Co-Pilot Move Over, jd
2003 Jayco Escapade 31A on 2002 Ford E450 V10 4R100 218" WB


Posted By: dennislanier on 11/18/15 12:11pm

Another vote for the solid metal valve stems. They will probably be my next purchase before de-winterizing next spring. A couple of months ago I bought new tires for my Class C, and went to CW to get new braided valve extensions for the inside dually tires. Gave them to the tire store so they could install them with the new tires. Took a short trip a couple weeks later and had a FLAT tire on the left inside. Came to find out that the extensions were screwed on too tight which caused the leak. With those kind of braided airless extensions they have to be screwed on just right. Too loose and you can't check pressure or add air, too tight and they will leak. My advice is just spend the money and get it done right.


Posted By: TwoPines on 11/18/15 12:15pm

Thanks to everyone responding to my questions!

I now understand that this is more than simply adding an extension and that the lasting solution is solid metal stems. I'll likely wait until the spring to have this done since I'm in the process of winterizing the RV right now and it appears the tires have sufficient pressure for the winter. Moreover, it's good to know that one can count on the great folks here to provide timely help. Thanks again. Your help is greatly appreciated.


Posted By: BruceMc on 11/18/15 04:09pm

In the mean time before you get a chance to put custom valve stems on, you can still properly maintain your tire pressures.

I added short extensions to the outer dual, and use the following process to check & add air (78% nitrogen!):

[image]

I can move them to any wheel I want when I rotate the tires. I just completed this task a month ago as I had a vibration develop in the front right on our last trip. I pull the wheels & haul them to the tire shop for balancing. I reinstall them where I want, and I ensure the duals are properly installed, that is, the sight hole in both wheels is lined up with the indicator in the hub, and the stems are opposite each other:

[image]

Here's my Pressure Checking Process in pictures.


'16 Forest River Sunseeker 2250SLEC Chevrolet 6.0L
Previously:
'00 Four Winds 26Q Class C (Ford E350 V10)
'96 Kit Sportsmaster 212f Fifth Wheel/'93 GMC Sierra K2500
'91 SunLite poptop truck camper
and the first: a Wildernest flip-top canopy.



Posted By: samven1 on 11/18/15 06:19pm

After doing all the research several months ago and deciding I needed the one piece valve stem and then calling around for someone to remove my tires to install them I went with a TPMS that has an in cab display. I still have to pop the hub caps to add air which is a pain but it is really nice to just flip the monitor on 5 min before I leave and read the tire pressure and temp of each tire. It is also very informative to see the temp and pressure change as you heat them up and one big surprise was watching the right hand side heat up and pressure rise going across SD with a strong wind from the left. In the 6 mos I have had them I only had to add air once because of the dropping temps and double check the monitor accuracy against my digital gauge.
They do all read 2 psi lower than my gauge but I am not sure which one is off since 2 psi is within the spec of both.


Sam
03 Dodge Ram 1500 QC LB Hemi
2015 Four Winds 22E Chevy


Posted By: jjrbus on 11/18/15 07:38pm

I had an expensive set of valve extenders on my motor home. One leaked, I almost lost a new $400 tire!

I recently purchased a Toyota motor home, on the drive home I heard a funny noise and wondered what it was and then BAM an inner dual self destructed. It was an old tire, when I was checking things the valve extension was broke.

Did the blowout break the valve extension, or did the broken valve extension cause the blow out? I'll never know.

Proper valve stems can be purchased along with gauges and inflators that will work with them. Only way I go.

I also use the 78% nitrogen fill. Jim
Jim


Posted By: OFDPOS on 11/18/15 07:39pm

samven1 wrote:

After doing all the research several months ago and deciding I needed the one piece valve stem and then calling around for someone to remove my tires to install them I went with a TPMS that has an in cab display. I still have to pop the hub caps to add air which is a pain but it is really nice to just flip the monitor on 5 min before I leave and read the tire pressure and temp of each tire. It is also very informative to see the temp and pressure change as you heat them up and one big surprise was watching the right hand side heat up and pressure rise going across SD with a strong wind from the left. In the 6 mos I have had them I only had to add air once because of the dropping temps and double check the monitor accuracy against my digital gauge.
They do all read 2 psi lower than my gauge but I am not sure which one is off since 2 psi is within the spec of both.


Or see the difference in tire temp parked with the sun heating up the tires that face it. Couldn't believe that much difference, watched a video showing a Class A with the big tires and they had a Infrared Thermometer showing the tires before sun-up 57 degrees and pressure at 80 all tires.
A couple hours later after the sun had been up they did it again only this time the two tires facing the sun were at 107 degrees and 85 pressure while the other two still in the shaded side were still 57 and 80 pressure...

Got one of those craftsman digital tire gauges for a stocking stuffer a couple yeas back , it reads 3.5 lbs less than 3 other (2 digital and 1 manual) cheap tire gauges I've had for years and yes all three of the gauges are different brands and they all read the same...
I guess so much for craftsman quality [emoticon] ...

Didn't mean to get off track but still related ...


Posted By: Gene in NE on 11/18/15 08:22pm

TwoPines wrote:

Looking for suggestions about options for adding air valve stem adapters on dual rear wheels? Bought a Jayco E-350 Class C with 225/75 16" tires a few months back and while winterizing noticed that the valve stems on the dual rear wheels are located between the two tires. So, unless I dismount the outer tire, I can't check tire pressure on either tire, nor can I add air if needed. Are there types of adapters preferred or are there replacement stems or what options are there? I would rather have an idea about what I need before going to the tire shop for a fix.
Thanks in advance.
Many of us have had the exact same concerns and have found a few ways to solve the problem. However, adding an extension piece usually will either have a slow leak or will break off the original rubber stem. We drove our RV to Midwest Tire Store that sells truck tires. Not tires for pickups, but for the 18 wheelers. Those trucks have a number of duals with the same problem. Midwest had bins full of the longer straight stems and the "u" shapped ones. You could select from brass or chrome. They were cheap - like $2 to $3 each. I had called them before driving down there and they knew exactly what I needed. I waited about 20 minutes and they were done with all 6 tires. They merely used a floor jack, raised the wheels in the air, used air guns to remove the lug nuts, took the wheels to the tire machine, broke the beads, threw away the old rubber shorties, put in the curved chrome stems, aired up the tires, mounted them and dropped the RV on the ground. Charged $10 per tire plus the $3 stem. Total cost about $80. They had done it hundreds of times before. [emoticon]


2002 Trail-Lite Model 211-S w/5.7 Chevy (click View Profile)
Gene


Posted By: j-d on 11/19/15 06:41am

Let me say again:

JUST GET SOMETHING THAT WON'T LET YOU DOWN!

OK - Here's a cheap fix:

Get Straight Metal Valve Stems

[image]

And Air-Through Caps

[image]

Put'em on all Six or Seven (if you've got a Spare) Wheels. You just need to remember you'll need TRUCK type Air Gauge and Air Chuck. The "straight" kind that are configured like this:

[image]

Not the more common angled one like this:

[image]

The STRAIGHT will pass through Dicor Simulators on the common 10-hole Ford wheels. Push straight onto the inner valve cap and pull back onto the outer.

Gene was fortunate. The truck shops I checked at couldn't give me what Gene got.

The fix I show here will also meet the wishes of those who want to rotate all their tires. I don't. I'm willing to leave the rear duals in place and rotate my spare with the two fronts.

Two cautions:

1. Domestic "Big Trucks" use a .625" hole in the wheel for the valve. Class C's, Cars, Pickups, etc. use .453". Some valves come with both gaskets, just be sure what you get fits .453".

2. On Ford Class C wheels, a 1-1/2" metal valve will NOT let you put even a truck air gauge onto the valve. The shape of the RIM interferes. You don't notice with Rubber valves since they'll flex. The custom guys (BORG, TM) sell Angled Front valves. If you use 2" valves, you're OK. OR... 1.5" + those Air Through Caps.

But remember this:

Friends Don't Let Friends Use Rubber Tire Valves!!!

Nope, not even with no extenders. That's how we got our Jayco, and I heard leaks just putting the gauge onto the fronts.


Posted By: Harvey51 on 11/19/15 02:15pm

Nice to have the Tire Man solution, but not necessary. I used plastic extenders that came with our used MH until I got new tires. I asked Costco to put longer valve stems on the outers so I could reach them with my pressure gauge: [image]
No problem with the inners. No extensions needed. I actually put regular valve caps on to keep dirt out and use BruceMc's hose or tube tool to put them on and take them off the inners (link in his post above). I can reach the outers with my fingers.

Now I'm just worried about j-d's warning about plastic valve stems. Costco only has plastic ones. Tires cost way more elsewhere. But no problems in 7 years, except one time when I tried metal extenders and one failed to close after I checked pressures at a rest stop. I will start looking for metal valve stems for the next time I get new tires.


2004 E350 Adventurer (Canadian) 20 footer - Alberta, Canada
No TV + 100W solar = no generator needed


Posted By: TwoPines on 11/19/15 02:38pm

More great information here. Really appreciated the different approaches being offered here, providing lots to think about including proper gauges and chucks.

For BruceMc, regarding those extension used on the outer tires, what are the wire clips used to keep them in place?


Posted By: BruceMc on 11/19/15 03:02pm

Those are short pieces of welding rod. A wire coat hanger would serve the same purpose.
Costco installed rubber stems on the first set, so I wanted to ensure the hook style extender wouldn't cause issues, which is why I created & installed the wire clips.
When those Michelins were recalled, Costco installed new stems, but this time they were metal, but still with a rubber base. A much more substantial base, but still a rubber base. I re-installed the clips.

I've yet to look at the stems on the new Sunseeker, but from what I've read, the wheels are supposed to have all-metal stems. (with a gasket/o-ring, of course) I'll install the same type of extenders on the Sunseeker before the winter is out.
On the ford, I initially tightened the inner fitting with a tiny set of channel-locks on the ford rims - it was a major pain. Subsequently, I installed the extender after balances, before the wheels were re-installed on the rig. I learned that it was easier to remove & haul them to Costco in my pickup rather than have them deal with it.... parking lot with jacks, anyone?

I posted an article on the recall, but can't seem to find it at the moment. Here's some images:
[image]

Michelin Tire Recall


Posted By: Gene in NE on 11/19/15 08:16pm

j-d wrote:

Let me say again:

JUST GET SOMETHING THAT WON'T LET YOU DOWN!

Gene was fortunate. The truck shops I checked at couldn't give me what Gene got.

1. Domestic "Big Trucks" use a .625" hole in the wheel for the valve. Class C's, Cars, Pickups, etc. use .453". Some valves come with both gaskets, just be sure what you get fits .453".

Friends Don't Let Friends Use Rubber Tire Valves!!!
I've "snipped" some wise comments from the excellent write-up by j-d. I should have expanded my comments. I drive a Chevy, so the rim holes are different than the Ford rims. Midwest Tire handles pickup, semi's, and the Class 5 and 6 trucks like you find on U-Haul lots and for furniture delivery trucks. So, I don't really know what the bins of straight and curved stems fit. I know the ones they used fit my Chevy rims just fine. [emoticon]


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