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Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Restoration & Vintage RVs

 > Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

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BigRabbitMan

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Posted: 04/12/19 10:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One last wood fact: redwood expands and contracts longitudinally rather than cross grain. Don’t know why but has to be allowed for when using it.


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turbojimmy

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Posted: 04/12/19 11:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fulltimin wrote:

I know this has gotten a little side tracked, but, I figure there may be some out there who have little to no experience with actual solid wood and it's seasonal movements. I figured this may, (or not), help someone.


I've been in my house for a little over 3 years now. It's the first house I've had with all solid wood (oak) flooring. I'm amazed at the gaps that open up between some of the planks in the winter. Not huge but noticeable. Right around this time of year they start closing up. By summer time they'll be gone. And don't get me started on sticky doors...

I put Pergo ("manufactured wood") in my Allegro. It's held up really well with the wild swings in temperature and humidity. It's not heated in the winter or cooled in the summer 99.999% of the time. Except for some scrapes from sliding chairs around, it looks like the day I installed it.


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Bruce Brown

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Posted: 04/12/19 08:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

turbojimmy wrote:

fulltimin wrote:

I know this has gotten a little side tracked, but, I figure there may be some out there who have little to no experience with actual solid wood and it's seasonal movements. I figured this may, (or not), help someone.


I've been in my house for a little over 3 years now. It's the first house I've had with all solid wood (oak) flooring. I'm amazed at the gaps that open up between some of the planks in the winter. Not huge but noticeable. Right around this time of year they start closing up. By summer time they'll be gone. And don't get me started on sticky doors...

I put Pergo ("manufactured wood") in my Allegro. It's held up really well with the wild swings in temperature and humidity. It's not heated in the winter or cooled in the summer 99.999% of the time. Except for some scrapes from sliding chairs around, it looks like the day I installed it.

Yup...one if the joys of true hardwood flooring. I've installed a bunch, still my favorite flooring.


There are 24 hours in every day - it all depends on how you choose to use them.
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fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 08:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BigRabbitMan wrote:

One last wood fact: redwood expands and contracts longitudinally rather than cross grain. Don’t know why but has to be allowed for when using it.




Don't have any experience with Redwood. Wish I did. No matter what, solid wood has a look that nothing else can fully replicate, but, like all things, isn't perfect to work with.

As long as considerations are taken for what the wood is going to do, it's all good!


If you want to do something, you will find a way.
If you don't, you will find an excuse.

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A lot of experience, comes from bad judgement.

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

turbojimmy wrote:

fulltimin wrote:

I know this has gotten a little side tracked, but, I figure there may be some out there who have little to no experience with actual solid wood and it's seasonal movements. I figured this may, (or not), help someone.


I've been in my house for a little over 3 years now. It's the first house I've had with all solid wood (oak) flooring. I'm amazed at the gaps that open up between some of the planks in the winter. Not huge but noticeable. Right around this time of year they start closing up. By summer time they'll be gone. And don't get me started on sticky doors...

I put Pergo ("manufactured wood") in my Allegro. It's held up really well with the wild swings in temperature and humidity. It's not heated in the winter or cooled in the summer 99.999% of the time. Except for some scrapes from sliding chairs around, it looks like the day I installed it.




Congrats on the Pergo. As long as you're happy, that's all that matters!

As far as sticky doors go, I normally trim mine when they get sticky, which around here is summer time, just to eliminate it, and then we're good to go for the rest of the year. It's easier to add weather stripping, if needed, than to deal with sticky doors.

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bruce Brown wrote:

turbojimmy wrote:

fulltimin wrote:

I know this has gotten a little side tracked, but, I figure there may be some out there who have little to no experience with actual solid wood and it's seasonal movements. I figured this may, (or not), help someone.


I've been in my house for a little over 3 years now. It's the first house I've had with all solid wood (oak) flooring. I'm amazed at the gaps that open up between some of the planks in the winter. Not huge but noticeable. Right around this time of year they start closing up. By summer time they'll be gone. And don't get me started on sticky doors...

I put Pergo ("manufactured wood") in my Allegro. It's held up really well with the wild swings in temperature and humidity. It's not heated in the winter or cooled in the summer 99.999% of the time. Except for some scrapes from sliding chairs around, it looks like the day I installed it.


Yup...one if the joys of true hardwood flooring. I've installed a bunch, still my favorite flooring.




Mine also.

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Moving on, here is a pic of one of the 2 pieces of glass next to the copilots window.

Both of them had a coating of window tint film applied on the inside. The film was not in the best of shape, so I prepared to remove it.

Before.



[image]

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Then of course, we have to have an after picture. That was a lot of fun, or not. Lol.

Had to use a razor blade to get the film off. Some of it would come off in a sheet, but most of it had to be scraped off.



[image]

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Back to the window frame, we have a close up of the window frame with the rubber.

The picture is labeled, with the glass sliding between the rubber gasket and then glued to the aluminum framing.

Obviously, the rubber gasket slides out, and is a replaceable part. Just in case you need to know how older windows were put together. Yours may be different, but this is what mine look like.



[image]

fulltimin

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Posted: 04/12/19 09:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I bought more ChemLink M-1, but only 3 tubes and this time it was black, instead of white. I think I'll be using that for the windows instead of the white stuff.

As such, I need to update the spreadsheet. former total was, $6685.02. 3 tubes @ %7.50 per tube, plus tax cost $23.85, so our new grand total amounts to $6708.87.

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