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Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Restoration & Vintage RVs

 > Anyone interested in 83 Pace Arrow Tear down and Rebuild?

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fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

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Posted: 08/11/19 09:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, it was a good weekend. Not for motor home work, but for getting another Pt Cruiser back on the road. I think it's about ready for state inspection.

I pulled some parts off of Wrinkles. Tires and wheels, wiper blades, front and rear, recently new battery, air filter, 1 brake caliper, and a clutch pedal cover.

Not sure I can do it, but if I can get the rear hatch open, I'll also take the rear lift supports for the rear gate. That'll save another $36.00 plus tax. Nothing like being cheap. Lol. Hey, I bought them a few years ago, so they're still in good shape if I can get to them.

That would amount to nearly $600 worth of stuff, for only $260.00. What a deal!

Nothing like having a spare car for parts! Wahoo!

Anyhow, while I was at it, I added new plugs and plug wires.

Ok, that should be nearly enough talk about the Pt Cruiser replacement. Time to get back to working on the motor home this week.

Working for the niece Monday, so it may or may not happen til Tuesday.


If you want to do something, you will find a way.
If you don't, you will find an excuse.

-------------------------------------------------

Good judgement comes from experience.
A lot of experience, comes from bad judgement.

2bzy2c

California

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Posted: 08/12/19 08:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FWIW - I used to build surfboards back in the day. We didn't have epoxy resins back then, just polyester. Considering your use, your common polyester resin will be just fine. Just make certain you use the proper amount of catalyst for the temperature out side. It makes a huge difference on working time and strength. Too much catalyst will make the resin overheat in the pot. Use type "S" cloth. It is the strongest and easiest to work with. You have a variety of cloth weights to chose from, though probably not at Home Depot. Also, there are two types of resin. One being a laminating resin, that stays a little sticky for applying multiple layers, and a sanding resin, that cures hard and allows for sanding and polishing. Surfboards generally use 4 oz on the bottom, and 8 oz on the deck. For your use, 8 oz is a good general weight.

Best of luck.


My advice is worth exactly what you paid for it.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

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Posted: 08/12/19 09:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, I should be able to get to work on the motor home tomorrow, FINALLY! Took the 2nd Pt Cruiser for inspection today, hopefully, tomorrow, I'll get a call and it will be done.

Time for some extra coats of fiberglass on the wheel wells, and the next move, whatever that is. Lol.

Thanks for hanging in there. It's time to get moving again, and make some progress.

I did contact Amazon about the failed shipment of the last gallon of Por 15, and they are sending another gallon, which should be here tomorrow. YeeHaw!

I am going to have to get some angle iron or aluminum shortly so I can finish the roof to side wall connection, and then fill in the inside corner with insulation.

Anyone have an easy way to bend angle iron/aluminum about an additional 30 degrees?

wildmanbaker

Kennewick, Washington

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Posted: 08/13/19 08:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Unless you are going to start with flat stock and weld them to the required angle, no. You will be hard pressed to find a shear/bender longer than 48". Most cheap benders will only do 90 degrees without a jig to go farther. Then if it is anything thicker than sheet metal, it may facture due to how it is made. You could try the Armstrong method, but it may not be a good look, or uniform.


Wildmanbaker


fulltimin

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Posted: 08/13/19 09:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wildmanbaker wrote:

Unless you are going to start with flat stock and weld them to the required angle, no. You will be hard pressed to find a shear/bender longer than 48". Most cheap benders will only do 90 degrees without a jig to go farther. Then if it is anything thicker than sheet metal, it may facture due to how it is made. You could try the Armstrong method, but it may not be a good look, or uniform.




Kind of what I had figured. I guess if I am going to bend that, I'll have to come up with something myself. Not sure that's going to happen.

If I can't come up with anything, I may have to do something differently.

I want to fasten the small roof overhang to the side of the wall framing at the top.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

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Posted: 08/13/19 09:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I took a little time today and worked on the fiberglass wheel well a little bit. There was an area on the one corner that didn't suit me, so I got the grinder out and cut out that section a little bit.

That's the cool thing with fiberglass. If you get an area that doesn't suit you, just grind it out, and fill it in with more cloth and resin, or epoxy.

After a couple of coats, looks good as new.

Here's the corner I worked on. Looks better than it did, but probably still could be better.



[image]

fulltimin

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Posted: 08/13/19 09:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is the other side of the wheel well. I added a section on the side, and also on the bottom. The darkened areas are where the new cloth and resin are.



[image]



Got the Pt Cruiser back today. Passed inspection, but not emissions. The car hasn't been driven enough since I put the battery in to set the computer for the test.

We'll have to drive it for a few days and take it back so the garage can run the emissions test. That means we should have another Pt Cruiser to drive! Yay!

STBRetired

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Posted: 08/14/19 07:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fulltimin wrote:


Kind of what I had figured. I guess if I am going to bend that, I'll have to come up with something myself. Not sure that's going to happen.

If I can't come up with anything, I may have to do something differently.

I want to fasten the small roof overhang to the side of the wall framing at the top.

The guys that did my facia and gutters when I had my roof replaced had a sheet metal brake that was 20' long. Now what they were bending was some pretty thin aluminum, but if you do not require structural strength from your junction piece, then you might be able to find a gutter/facia guy who could do some bending for you.


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fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

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Posted: 08/14/19 09:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

STBRetired wrote:

fulltimin wrote:


Kind of what I had figured. I guess if I am going to bend that, I'll have to come up with something myself. Not sure that's going to happen.

If I can't come up with anything, I may have to do something differently.

I want to fasten the small roof overhang to the side of the wall framing at the top.

The guys that did my facia and gutters when I had my roof replaced had a sheet metal brake that was 20' long. Now what they were bending was some pretty thin aluminum, but if you do not require structural strength from your junction piece, then you might be able to find a gutter/facia guy who could do some bending for you.



Well, I suppose if I had them bend enough of layers, that would give me the strength I want. Lol.

Drawing below is what I am trying to accomplish. The green angle is where I wanted to put the steel/aluminum and fasten it to both the roof plywood and the upper side wall.



[image]



The purpose is to make sure the plywood would be straight running between the joists from front to rear.

The second function was to be able to attach brackets to hold solar panels that I plan on putting on the roof.

I am probably too paranoid about putting holes in the roof, but I figured if I attach brackets at the end of the roof plywood, I could eliminate another place for leakage. (Silly, I know).

As such, it's kinda structural, and yet not really for the overall roof to sidewall connection. More so for the solar mounts.

fulltimin

Home is where we Park It.

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Posted: 08/14/19 09:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I added another layer of fiberglass and resin today. It's starting to get smoother and thicker, as well as stonger.

The pic looks not very great, but the grooves are actually on the back side of the glass, and I intend to fill them in and smooth them out before calling this complete.

It is definitely getting much stronger with each coat.



[image]



I gotta start doing some other work and finishing up with the fiberglass later in the day.

Couple of things I have learned with the glass. It takes longer than you think. Lol. That's pretty much true with almost any project.

Using a little more resin seems to make things smoother, and thicker, faster.

The smell is the same, whether you use a little or a lot. Yes, I used a respirator, but, Ya gotta take it off sometime. Lol.

Anyhow, I had to spend a little more time on the Cruiser today, and probably will tomorrow, but, that should soon end, and I'll get moving a little faster here shortly. Wahoo!

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