RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Tech Issues: Generator questions!

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Generator questions!

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 7  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
azrving

Tucson

Senior Member

Joined: 05/17/2013

View Profile



Posted: 09/21/17 10:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

From what I can gather a furnace blower typically pulls about 7-10 amps, depending on size. I'm picking 8 amps without knowing the model of the furnace (RV is in IL right now and I am in TN.) So if the furnace runs say 8 hours out of 24 (very generous estimate), that would be 64 amp-hours.

Our other battery usage is very low---no big inverter for microwave or coffeepot or hairdryer. We run the water pump and LED lighting. We have a 12V outlet that we use with a 400W inverter to charge electronics, but that is often done in the tow vehicle while out and about. Very little or no TV use.

I'm going to estimate 80 amp-hours/day and I think that's generous based on our habits.

So we need a converter that will replace that 80 amp-hours in a reasonable amount of time, say 4 hours or less. That means a converter with a bulk charge mode of 20 amps or higher. So a 30 or 40 amp converter should serve us well.

We will likely be at an electric site at least once a week, for 24 hours or longer. So if we get the batteries up even close to 100% otherwise, during that time frame they should definitely get maxed out and be just fine.

Does my reasoning make sense? Any big flaws in my logic?


If you are down 80 amp hours a 20 amp converter wont recharge in 4 hours. A 40 amp converter wont recharge it in 2 hours either. A 50 amp convert will work just fine and if you ever go to four gc2 it will still work pretty good.

* This post was edited 09/21/17 10:48pm by an administrator/moderator *

byronlj

Arizona

Senior Member

Joined: 11/30/2002

View Profile



Posted: 09/21/17 10:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You must decide on brand on your own. I bought the predator 3500 after owning a Yamaha for many years and I am very happy with it. You can buy an extended warranty within 30 days of purchase. I live at 6600' and the predator runs fine. You can look in that long Predator post for my input if you wish.
Dave


byronlj
07.5 Silverado LTZ Ex. Cab 3500HD dually 4X4 duramax 2013 Dynamax Trilogy 3800RL 99 Arctic Fox 990S truck camper


MrWizard

Traveling

Moderator

Joined: 06/27/2004

View Profile



Posted: 09/21/17 11:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

you can get back to about 80% at what ever max amps the batteries will accept
then approx 2hrs to from 80% to 90%

after that from 90% is a long run time, in the summer needing A/C it happens almost everyday

but in weather where the A/C is not needed, a conscious effort must be made to spend the GAS and effort of charging the batteries

spending 24Hrs or more on shore power should accomplish this, IF you did NOT allow them be be run down below 50%
but don't expect a full rehab, on an overnight 12hr charge, in at 6pm and out the next morning

i think your plans are reasonable

of course NO battle plan survives contact with the enemy, in this case 'weather' and use/abuse are the enemy

enjoy your big trip


Radiate The Happy
....

Connected using Verizon and AT&T


MEXICOWANDERER

las peƱas, michoacan, mexico

Senior Member

Joined: 06/01/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/22/17 02:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

theoldwizard1 wrote:

MEXICOWANDERER wrote:

After roaring and fuming, this power supply gets my vote and the only viable battery charger that will do whatever you want it to.
.
.
.
http://www.trcelectronics.com/View/Mean-Well/RSP-750-15.shtml

Whoa !

Mexico, I thought you were hooked on MegaWatt power supplies. Why the change of heart ?

Personally, I think a 50A power supply is overkill for someone with a dual 6V golf cart battery bank.


This single unit would be by far the quickest route to charge batteries as used in a stand alone position. The Megawatt intends to be a supplemental charging unit used to augment a "decent" on board converter. The WFCO is an indecent on board converter and folks who rely on a WFCO for boondocking are braver than I. If the converter does what WFCO does "best" a 400 watt Megawatt is just plain too small.

This Meanwell pumps out a minimum of 50 amperes and when you calculate a 50 percent SOC acceptance in excess of 100 amperes, suddenly 50 looks like the bare minimum. After about an hour's worth of charging charge acceptance will be falling toward the 50 amp mark but with the unit set at 14.8 volts, it's going to feed far and away more power safely than any brainless smart charger.

I chose a pair of modified Megawatts as the heart of the Borg system. Not the least of which is the fact the Borg is two Megawatts meaning backups that are totally interchangeable with one another. More modifications meant a total charger delivery in excess of 90 amperes. And a programmable timer to default from absorbsion to float whenever I wish. And utterly adjustable absorbsion and float voltage limits AND an ability to supply in excess of 40 amperes at FLOAT to eliminate psychotic needless cycling with varying hotel loads.

When a person considers it takes a wheeled charger the size of a 7,000 BTU portable air conditioner to do less than what a cigar box size Meanwell can do, the choice is pretty clear. This critter has a remote on/off switch capability and remote voltage sensing capability.

There is no one-size-fits-all answer for battery charging. It took a lot of effort from Mr Crippled here to manufacture the Borg. I certainly do not expect anyone in their right mind follow in my footsteps. The Borg has been working 24/7 for years. This is what I demanded. I am going forward with the successor of the Borg, the Hyperwatt. The Hyperwatt will have twin 56 amp Megawatts, but the float unit will use an ultra heavy duty thermistor to compensate temps from -20F to +122F

SoundGuy

S Ontario

Senior Member

Joined: 02/11/2015

View Profile



Posted: 09/22/17 03:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

Question 2: How much does altitude affect the performance of this type of generator? Many of our planned campsites are at 5000 ft elevation or higher.


Any gas aspired engine fed with a carburetor will suffer noticeable power loss as altitude increases, particularly above 5000' - Honda offers a couple of high altitude jets to help alleviate this issue but other brands may or may not. Since much of your intended use seems to be at altitude the class leading Honda EU3000iS would be a logical choice, especially if you're retiring and expect to have the opportunity to use it a lot.

Personally I wouldn't swap out your converter just because it's a WFCO ... try it first for awhile, then if you find your charge times are longer than you'd like that's when it would make sense to consider a more capable charger. Who knows, in time you might even want to add a couple of solar panels to reduce your reliance on the genset, in which case upgrading the WFCO would be a waste. Baby steps. [emoticon]

ReneeG

Meridian, Idaho

Senior Member

Joined: 07/13/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/22/17 07:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

time2roll wrote:

I would skip the generator and get 200 to 400 watts solar.
I doubt you will need air April/May but if you do get some hookups.
Was rather warm last month at Glacier. We were seeing 90+ and plugged in. Locals were saying it was the most heat ever. But you will be there early.

If you get a generator you also need to get a new converter such as the PD9260-14.8
WFCO is a trickle charge at 13.6 volts unless you are one of the lucky few where it actually works in boost mode.

http://www.bestconverter.com/PD-9260C-148-60-Amp-RV-Converter


We have solar and can run everything but AC and MW on it. We have an eu2000 Honda for backup, but have not had to use it since installing solar and have camped in late fall using the heater, etc., but we also supplement heat with a Mr. Heater Big Buddy. Everyone's right about not needing AC at that time of year, but other times at that elevation you will. We dry camped at 5600 elevation over the Labor Day weekend and it was hot. Hot enough that we will be purchasing an extra eu2000 to connect with our first in order to run AC when needed. If you're going to purchase anything for your RV, plan it to address future (possible) needs.


2011 Bighorn 3055RL
2011 F350 SD CC DRW 6.7L Diesel Lariat, Hensley BD3 with Ford Under-Bed Adaptor
Dave & Renee plus (Champ, Molly, Paris, and Missy in spirit), Maggie, and Mica!


RSD559

Central California

Senior Member

Joined: 07/09/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/22/17 10:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SoundGuy wrote:

coolmom42 wrote:

Question 2: How much does altitude affect the performance of this type of generator? Many of our planned campsites are at 5000 ft elevation or higher.


Any gas aspired engine fed with a carburetor will suffer noticeable power loss as altitude increases, particularly above 5000' - Honda offers a couple of high altitude jets to help alleviate this issue but other brands may or may not. Since much of your intended use seems to be at altitude the class leading Honda EU3000iS would be a logical choice, especially if you're retiring and expect to have the opportunity to use it a lot.

Personally I wouldn't swap out your converter just because it's a WFCO ... try it first for awhile, then if you find your charge times are longer than you'd like that's when it would make sense to consider a more capable charger. Who knows, in time you might even want to add a couple of solar panels to reduce your reliance on the genset, in which case upgrading the WFCO would be a waste. Baby steps. [emoticon]

If you do go with the "class leading Honda EU3000iS", you probably have the spare $300 to get the MicroAir Easy Start. About a 50/50 chance you'll need it to start your A/C with your "class leading Honda EU3000iS". Been there, done that. So have a bunch of others.


2017 Highland Ridge Ultra Lite UT2704bh.Just right ++
Ford F-150 Ecoboost V6. Very happy.
Honda Ruckus scooter - Great fun.
Suzuki Burgman 400 scooter - Greater fun.
Champion 3100 Inverter Generator - (huge grin)!

TomG2

Central Illinois

Senior Member

Joined: 03/07/2004

View Profile



Posted: 09/22/17 10:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Is that "Class leading" in terms of weight or price? Come on Honda fanatics, it is a joke. Take a deep breath and relax.

SoundGuy

S Ontario

Senior Member

Joined: 02/11/2015

View Profile



Posted: 09/22/17 10:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RSD559 wrote:

If you do go with the "class leading Honda EU3000iS", you probably have the spare $300 to get the MicroAir Easy Start. About a 50/50 chance you'll need it to start your A/C with your "class leading Honda EU3000iS". Been there, done that. So have a bunch of others.


And I'm one of those who could successfully & repeated start my 13,500 BTU Coleman Mach 3+ A/C with the smaller EU2000i, the only downside being that as outside ambient temps rose into the 90s so too did compressor head pressure so success under those conditions wasn't always guaranteed. However, had I'd been aware of a product like the Micro Air Easy Start at the time, yeah I'd have installed one on the A/C ... whether this would also be required with an EU3000iS I couldn't say as I've never tried it but yes, the Easy Start would be an obvious solution. "Class leading" as no other genset in this class is anywhere near as quiet, despite what any pundits may claim.

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/22/17 10:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SoundGuy wrote:

Personally I wouldn't swap out your converter just because it's a WFCO ... try it first for awhile, then if you find your charge times are longer than you'd like that's when it would make sense to consider a more capable charger.
I agree except you can immediately know by measuring the voltage.

Leave a light on and run the battery to 11.9 to 12.2 volts and then plug in. Voltage should steadily rise to 14.2 to 14.4 volts and you are good.(let charge 24+ hours) More likely 13.4 to 13.6 and you have a dud trickle charging WFCO that needs replaced. Do not wait for the big boondocking trip to find this out.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 7  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Generator questions!
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2017 CWI, Inc. © 2017 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS