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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > The difference between dry an loaded weight.

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Mickeyfan0805

SE Wisconsin

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Posted: 02/28/18 10:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As others have said, there is a huge difference between going off of 'dry' and what I consider 'empty' weight. Dry weight doesn't consider late manufacturer and/or dealer adds and mods, fluids, etc... Depending on tank sizes dry weight can be bumped by 500+ pounds by batteries, water and propane alone. Other items can drive it even higher. Empty weight, in my mind, is what the trailer weighed when you got it home and had it loaded with propane and a 'typical' amount of fresh water (for your usage).

So, it is not at all surprising to me that you are running at 1,200-1,400 pounds above dry, but my guess is that 1/3 or more of that weight has nothing to do with your gear and a lot more to do with the real 'empty' weight of the trailer.

rbpru

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Posted: 02/28/18 11:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have long since given up on where the 1200 to 1400 lbs of TT weight came from. It is a 2010 Dutchmen Lite that I bought used and for all I know the dry weight figures never were correct.

What was deceptive was the 8% tongue weight from the factory and the 10% figure in the Ford towing guide.

So the point of my post was to advise the newcomer and not so newcomer to be careful when "guesstamating" tongue weight.

The easiest way was to have others comment on their discoveries. There is a lot of experience on this website.


Twenty six foot 2010 Dutchmen Lite pulled with a 2011 EcoBoost F-150 4x4.

Just right for Grandpa, Grandma and the dog.


1stgenfarmboy

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Posted: 02/28/18 11:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Camper manufacturers need to only list the MAX trailer weight on the tag, if this was done there would be far less confusion.

I just figure my trailer weighs the max every time I leave home.

My 24ft TT has a dry weight of 5300ish and a max load of 7,500, and the tongue weight is 900lbs when loaded to go.


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Takamine

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Posted: 02/28/18 01:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When we were in the process of transitioning from the pup to a TT, I was concerned about weight, so I weighed every piece of stuff that was in the pup which came to around 300 pounds. That added to the TT, along with bedding, food and a few luxuries, still only came to around 500 pounds of cargo. Add a full tank of fresh water, a battery and a couple of propane tanks and soon we were at 1000 pounds. It doesn't take long for it to add up to more than what you think.


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coolmom42

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Posted: 02/28/18 01:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So you are adding 1200-1400 lb to the dry weight. I've heard estimates of around 1000-1200 lb. Much of that is batteries and propane, depending on your setup.

Is that with a full tank of fresh water?


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coolmom42

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Posted: 02/28/18 01:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So you are adding 1200-1400 lb to the dry weight. I've heard estimates of around 1000-1200 lb. Much of that is batteries and propane, depending on your setup.

Is that with a full tank of fresh water?

bobndot

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Posted: 02/28/18 02:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dry weights are often without any optional equipment.
I added about 1500-1700# to the 4500# dry wt and doubled the TW to 950#-975# . My Jayco has an Acrtic package and Elite package which is a 12 option package .

My tw is sometimes more, depending if I carry a bikes ( 50# combined weight ) on the tongue or not (the tongue rack is there in place regardless)
I use 1000# bars but 1200's would also work.

Mickeyfan0805

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Posted: 02/28/18 02:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:


What was deceptive was the 8% tongue weight from the factory and the 10% figure in the Ford towing guide.

So the point of my post was to advise the newcomer and not so newcomer to be careful when "guesstamating" tongue weight.

The easiest way was to have others comment on their discoveries. There is a lot of experience on this website.


Dead on all around! As for the 10% - that is more common for utility trailers and boats, which is where the number comes from.

BurbMan

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Posted: 02/28/18 03:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was at 6900 empty, 8500 loaded, so about 1600 lbs in "stuff", but the TT is 32'. In fairness, I had the fresh tank half full, so that was a couple hundred pounds right there (25 gal x 8 lbs/gal = 200 lbs).

I have been saying for years that the "average" family adds about 1200 lbs in STUFF to an RV. If the trailer is smaller it's usually around a 1000 lbs, if a bigger bunk model with kids (and toys) can be upwards of 1500+ lbs.

Hard to believe that pots/pans, clothes, groceries, etc can add that much but it's true. We were at the RV show last week looking to see if anything smaller that we liked and surprised to see TTs listed with 800-900 total carrying capacity. Most will be overweight when they leave the driveway with RVers complaining about blowouts....


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Oasisbob

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Posted: 02/28/18 03:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From dry to ready to camp we gained a tad less than 600 pounds. Full water tank, twin batteries, fire wood, cloth's food. I would guess we have gained weight over the past many years. I would guess the tongue weight would rise accordingly, but mayby not.


Oasis Bob
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HAPPY TRAILS">

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