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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Moving to Class C from TT Need Guidance

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Winnebago Bob

United States

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Posted: 03/06/18 07:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

S1njin wrote:

Winnebago Bob wrote:

After 15 years and two TTs we moved to a Class C last year. Did about 160 days last season and learned a lot. They are very different animals.


What's your yellow sticker CCC on that rig? 27' - it should be much more favorable then the 32' rigs.


Model is 27K but she's a 30'.

2610 pounds CCC. [emoticon]

It's one of the highest CCCs available in a very well-equipped Class C, and we have one of the biggest storage areas available.


2017 Winnebago Aspect 27K

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S1njin

NJ

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Posted: 03/07/18 05:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Winnebago Bob wrote:

S1njin wrote:

Winnebago Bob wrote:

After 15 years and two TTs we moved to a Class C last year. Did about 160 days last season and learned a lot. They are very different animals.


What's your yellow sticker CCC on that rig? 27' - it should be much more favorable then the 32' rigs.


Model is 27K but she's a 30'.

2610 pounds CCC. [emoticon]

It's one of the highest CCCs available in a very well-equipped Class C, and we have one of the biggest storage areas available.


I hear you - it’s one of the things I love about the rig I’m about to pick up. 3500 pounds !


2019 Jayco Greyhawk 26Y


legolas

North East Ohio

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Posted: 03/07/18 08:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WOW, I knew I'd get good stuff thanks to all who took time to give advice. Not to appear to stupid ...just stupid enough.....I understand the definition of "tail swing" but not necessarily the actual working if that makes any sense. Perhaps someone can give me an example. I know it sounds dumb.

NWboondocker

Hillsboro, OR

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Posted: 03/07/18 08:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

legolas wrote:

WOW, I knew I'd get good stuff thanks to all who took time to give advice. Not to appear to stupid ...just stupid enough.....I understand the definition of "tail swing" but not necessarily the actual working if that makes any sense. Perhaps someone can give me an example. I know it sounds dumb.


The most extreme case is cranking the steering wheel to the stops from a stopped position, then taking off. The back end pivots around the rear axle, leaving the body overhang to swing into whatever is adjacent (gas pump, car in next lane, etc.). You moderate it by starting to turn slowly as you pull away, then turning harder later in the turn once clear of potential obstructions.


'13 Coachmen Freelander 26QB


snowdance

State of Jefferson

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Posted: 03/07/18 09:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Getting lots of good advice.. Couple things from some one doing the RV thing from 1969.
Look close at the rear of the RV does the rear over hang slope up the the bumper or just stay flat. Rear slope up keeps you from draging getting into drives and service stations.

When you find the rig you like.. If it has slides put them in and see if you can find comfort in the drivers and passengers seats.. can you recline them back enough to be comfortable.. I found one class C we loved but when the slides were in I could not get into the drivers seat because the slide made it lean forward. I am 5'8" , weigh 150 lbs.. Also check to see if you can access the bathroom and kitchen with the slides in..

Hope you find the RV of your dreams..


Snowdance

We spent most of our money traveling... Just wasted the rest..

Chevy 7.4 Vortex
2000 Jamboree 23b Rear Kitchen

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DrewE

Vermont

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Posted: 03/07/18 09:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

NWboondocker wrote:

legolas wrote:

WOW, I knew I'd get good stuff thanks to all who took time to give advice. Not to appear to stupid ...just stupid enough.....I understand the definition of "tail swing" but not necessarily the actual working if that makes any sense. Perhaps someone can give me an example. I know it sounds dumb.


The most extreme case is cranking the steering wheel to the stops from a stopped position, then taking off. The back end pivots around the rear axle, leaving the body overhang to swing into whatever is adjacent (gas pump, car in next lane, etc.). You moderate it by starting to turn slowly as you pull away, then turning harder later in the turn once clear of potential obstructions.


If you're of a bit of a mathematical or mechanical bent, it can help your understanding to think a bit about the physics of a vehicle turning. At any given point in time, the motion at the wheels needs to be perpendicular to their axles (or the wheel will be skidding sideways in addition to rolling). This means that the axles all intersect the center point of your turning circle. The outside corner of the rear end of the vehicle (and, I guess, the inside corner too if it's long enough and you can turn sharply enough) will of necessity be at a greater radius from the center than the outside edge of the outside rear wheel.

When translated into practical terms on the ground, this means that the back corner swings further out than the back wheel when making a turn, and if you start off approaching the turn straight with an obstruction next to you on the outside edge, it will swing into the obstruction--something that doesn't intuitively feel right, even though it's physically sound.

This also helps explain why you need to pull further ahead than in a car or pickup before turning to avoid clipping curbs. The key consideration is where the back axle aligns with the center of your turn, but you're seeing things from the perspective of somewhere closer to the front axle, and with a longer vehicle there's a bigger difference between the two.





pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/09/18 10:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Winnebago Bob wrote:

Model is 27K but she's a 30'.

2610 pounds CCC.

It's one of the highest CCCs available in a very well-equipped Class C, and we have one of the biggest storage areas available.


I just compared the specs of your 29'5" Aspect on the current E450 chassis to those of our 24'7" non-slide Spirit on it's 2005 E450 chassis.

Our CCC is of course off the charts too, even considering the lesser GVWR of our 2005 E450 chassis .... which is one of the reasons why we wanted a small non-slide Winnebago Class C on the optional E450 chassis.

Note that your excellent CCC relative to the size of your Class C is primarily due to the generous improved front axle rating of your current E450 chassis over that of earlier ones. What this means is that as you make use of your high CCC rating ... make sure it's mostly in the FRONT HALF of your rig that you do it. [emoticon]

* This post was edited 03/09/18 11:47am by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

DrewE

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Posted: 03/09/18 11:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:


Note that your excellent CCC relative to the size of your Class C is primarily due to the generous improved front axle rating of your current E450 chassis over that of earlier ones. What this means is that as you make use of your high CCC rating ... make sure it's mostly in the REAR HALF of your rig that you do it. [emoticon]


I believe you meant to say FRONT HALF abobve.

(Adding weight in back of the rear axle will unload the front axle and transfer that additional weight to the rear one, as with any lever.)

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/09/18 11:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DrewE wrote:

I believe you meant to say FRONT HALF abobve.


Andrew ... kindof right you were!

However, taking into account the long wheelbase of Bob's Aspect, maybe I should have said something like "make sure it's mostly in the MIDDLE HALF of your rig that you do it". [emoticon]

* This post was edited 03/09/18 01:38pm by pnichols *

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