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 > Class C Ford E-450 chassis spare tire -- or lack thereof

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Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 09/10/18 05:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On our E-350 2012 Nexus 24' C I mounted the typical bumper mount spare tire holder to our square rear bumper.... After a couple of thousand miles through pretty close to every pothole between Tucson and Maine the mount fractured leaving my spare leaning back at a 45 degree angle. Fortunarely I caught it in time, moved it to the cab over and got on down the road.

I have yet to ever encounter a bumper mount spare tire holder any sronger than the one I mounted and it quickly failed. The physics of this equation simply dictate failure. The leverage imparted by the weight of a spare combined with the bumps and motion of being located on the rear bumper guarantees a a disaster and probably sooner than later.

We solved the problem {after the failure} by stopping at the Nexus factory in Elkhart {which we happily were passing by} and had them custom weld a spare tire mount up under the rear of the coach. The weight is down low, very secure and out of the way but ready for deployment when we need it and there is no question that some day we WILL need it.

A couple of decades ago the auto industry decided that no one needed a real spare and the little mini spares began appearing in trunks across the nation. These are garbage, probably the worst idea to ever emerge from Detroit and it remains a concept {less than a real spare} embraced by the RV industry {because it saves them money to not install a proper spare}.

IMHO: Get a proper spare, fully mounted on the appropriate wheel and then... get on down to Harbor freight {or wherever} and buy the tools necessary to change said sapre - Bottle jack, jackstands, lug wrench, chocks, tire reparir kit and a compressor is a nice touch. Practice at home in your driveway and hope that when you call your ERS they arrive promptly {not likely} change your tire and send you on your way but... knowing that in a pinch you can get it done without them.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]





IAMICHABOD

Sunny So Cal 90713

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Posted: 09/10/18 05:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The rear bumper may not be the best choice,although some RVs have them.
Mine is mounted inside my large rear storage compartment,bolted to a frame that is welded to the frame rails.

[image]
Another way to go is mounting the spare using the receiver.

Here are some examples

Or you can mount it underneath

Like Baja Man did

I also carry roadside assistance,to have them do the replacement.
If you don't have your own tire you are at the mercy of them to get one for you and that is really expensive.


2006 TIOGA 26Q CHEVY 6.0 WORKHORSE VORTEC
Former El Monte RV Rental

Buying A Rental Class C

Chevrolet Based Class C


ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 09/10/18 06:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Back in the day, our Phoenix Cruiser included an integrated spare tire compartment (with spare tire & wheel) as shown.
[image]

As of late, now you have to special order a PC and request it, otherwise you will get this [emoticon]
[image]


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


rjstractor

Maple Valley, WA

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Posted: 09/10/18 06:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I vote for the under-mount between the frame rails. This keeps it out of sight of potential thieves (although I suppose they may look under) and away from UV exposure. Changing one of these is not much different than a full size HD pickup. The rear axle will be heavier of course, but the tires are about the same weight and the lugs should only be tightened to 140 ft./lbs. A person of average strength should have no problems loosening or tightening with a standard 2 foot tire iron as long as some knucklehead installer didn't rattle them on with a 3/4" impact wrench. These are nowhere near as difficult as the 22.5s found on larger rigs, these are often torqued to 450-500 ft./lbs.

Expyinflight

Mesa, Arizona

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Posted: 09/10/18 07:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The spare tire on our 2017 Winnebago Spirit 25b was optional. I wanted one, and would not leave home without it. Ours is mounted inside the rear storage compartment.
Our neighbor just bought a 2019 Winnebago Spirit 22m. The optional spare tire is mounted underneath, between the frame rails.


2017 Winnebago Spirit 25b

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 09/10/18 10:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rjstractor wrote:

I vote for the under-mount between the frame rails. This keeps it out of sight of potential thieves (although I suppose they may look under) and away from UV exposure. Changing one of these is not much different than a full size HD pickup. The rear axle will be heavier of course, but the tires are about the same weight and the lugs should only be tightened to 140 ft./lbs. A person of average strength should have no problems loosening or tightening with a standard 2 foot tire iron as long as some knucklehead installer didn't rattle them on with a 3/4" impact wrench. These are nowhere near as difficult as the 22.5s found on larger rigs, these are often torqued to 450-500 ft./lbs.


That's exactly where my Winnebago Itasca came with it's spare - mounted in the rear up in between the frame rails just like where the spare is on a pickup truck - including my GMC pickup.

I would not buy a new motorhome without a spare ... but I would also tell the salesman that ... so that he knew why I walked away from a new model they were showing me that otherwise met all of my other requirements. This would be called "customer feedback" and might train the dealer to order all future inventory with spares!

I also carry all the equipment along in our Class C to jack up the rig, inflate a tire, plug a puncture hole in a tire, or change a bad tire ... just in case we're out someplace where ERS won't come to.

P.S. We also carry along a satellite access texting device to maybe get help when cell phones wont' work.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

b17drvr

Houston

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Posted: 09/10/18 10:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

On our E-350 2012 Nexus 24' C I mounted the typical bumper mount spare tire holder to our square rear bumper.... After a couple of thousand miles through pretty close to every pothole between Tucson and Maine the mount fractured leaving my spare leaning back at a 45 degree angle. Fortunarely I caught it in time, moved it to the cab over and got on down the road.

I have yet to ever encounter a bumper mount spare tire holder any sronger than the one I mounted and it quickly failed. The physics of this equation simply dictate failure. The leverage imparted by the weight of a spare combined with the bumps and motion of being located on the rear bumper guarantees a a disaster and probably sooner than later.

We solved the problem {after the failure} by stopping at the Nexus factory in Elkhart {which we happily were passing by} and had them custom weld a spare tire mount up under the rear of the coach. The weight is down low, very secure and out of the way but ready for deployment when we need it and there is no question that some day we WILL need it.

A couple of decades ago the auto industry decided that no one needed a real spare and the little mini spares began appearing in trunks across the nation. These are garbage, probably the worst idea to ever emerge from Detroit and it remains a concept {less than a real spare} embraced by the RV industry {because it saves them money to not install a proper spare}.

IMHO: Get a proper spare, fully mounted on the appropriate wheel and then... get on down to Harbor freight {or wherever} and buy the tools necessary to change said sapre - Bottle jack, jackstands, lug wrench, chocks, tire reparir kit and a compressor is a nice touch. Practice at home in your driveway and hope that when you call your ERS they arrive promptly {not likely} change your tire and send you on your way but... knowing that in a pinch you can get it done without them.

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]


The auto industry went to the small spares to save fuel. They are much lighter.

Last month a young guy at work was late because he had a flat. He said AAA took awhile. I asked him if the car had a spare, he said it did. He said he had to wait for AAA to change it. I asked why he didn’t change it and he said he didn’t know how.

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 09/11/18 06:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

I also carry all the equipment along in our Class C to jack up the rig, inflate a tire, plug a puncture hole in a tire, or change a bad tire ... just in case we're out someplace where ERS won't come to.
pnichols is offering very good advise.

In the 11 years owning our E350 chassis motor home, I finally had a reason to handle the front tires when replacing the shock absorbers. Over the years on RV forums including this one, there is much mention of road-side assistance for changing a tire. It had me thinking the tires are too heavy to handle. I am not a strong person, never was, never was athletic because of it, never worked out, 60 years old, not young, yet I had no physical challenge in removing the front tires and put them back on. They reminded me of handling the tires on my first car, a 1971 Delta-88. Maybe in my 70's and beyond I might consider roadside assistance.

I advise to do as pnichols says and carry what you need to change or repair a tire yourself, and actually "change" the tire yourself if or when you need to. A half hour delay is much better than wasting a day or longer. If you don't know how, learn how at home. It takes just one practice.

lakeside013104

North America

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Posted: 09/11/18 06:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

My philosophy about not having a spare on board is like getting dressed and not putting on pants. Might be ok around the house but anywhere else, not so good.

I have a spare on mine and if I could not physically change it, still would be cheaper than having a road service to a tire change off and on a rim in the boonies. A mounted spare makes life easier and much less expensive because, it's not if you get a flat, it's when you get a flat.

Happens to everyone sometime and the difference between being prepared and caught with no pants on can be appreciable, money wise.

Ponder that.


Good one, Mr. Sidecar, Your post gives me something else besides my zipper, military alignment and whether or not my belt is on backwards to think about every time I put my pants on from now on. Now I will be thinking about my spare tire.

Seriously, it is a very good idea to travel with a spare already mounted tire and wheel. Great idea to be prepared whether driving an RV, camper, 5er, boat, auto, or utility trailer. Cheaper in the long run and the preparation comes with peace of mind.

Lakeside

mleekamp

Washington, IL

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Posted: 09/11/18 06:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for all the great info. I agree it should have a spare, and you gave me exactly what I hoped for...your situations and experiences. LIke I said, we always added a spare to our various TT's over the years.

When we looked at the C, I glanced under, from the middle of the unit, and all looked ok. Could not see the back overhang. SHame on me for not verifying.

Before our big trip next summer to Glacier & Yellowstone, a spare will be added.


2019 Jayco Redhawk 29XK Class C, Ford V10 E450 with Roadmaster Hitch Mounted Spare Tire holder, Bigfoot Hydraulic Leveling
Dinghy: 2021 Ford Ranger XL

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