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jfkbunkie

Chicago

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Posted: 12/06/18 07:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is our first year storing a Class A for the winter. Previously, with towables (and inexpensive used ones, at that), I just protected the plumbing and not much else. Now, with a brand new Class A, I'd like to be more thorough. We're storing outdoors in the cold and snowy midwest, so I bought a cover. Looking for opinions from others on:

1. Relieving weight from tires
2. Periodically exercising the drivetrain
3. House battery disconnection vs. maintenance charging
4. Deterring rodent entry

dalenoel

S.E. Michigan

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Posted: 12/06/18 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Your situation may be different but in Michigan I do the same for the coach as I did with the TT. I have it next to the S&B so it is plugged in all the time. I do not cover but we leave for south in January. I do not exercise the drive train but will use the block heater prior to driving. rodent entry has not been a problem at this house but was at our other home. Normal plugging of all entry points, etc. for rodents. I also do not put it up on jacks.

Don't know if this helps but it may give you other ideas.


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Matt_Colie

Southeast Michigan

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Posted: 12/06/18 08:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jfkbunkie wrote:

This is our first year storing a Class A for the winter. Previously, with towables (and inexpensive used ones, at that), I just protected the plumbing and not much else. Now, with a brand new Class A, I'd like to be more thorough. We're storing outdoors in the cold and snowy midwest, so I bought a cover. Looking for opinions from others on:

1. Relieving weight from tires
2. Periodically exercising the drivetrain
3. House battery disconnection vs. maintenance charging
4. Deterring rodent entry

Well JFK,
I will answer your points directly:
1 - Makes little difference. Covered is good, but it isn't sun that hurts them, it is heat and you won't see much of that for a while.
2 - Don't do it. Unless you plan to take the coach out on the sale (fender solvent) coated roads long enough to get it to full temperature, leave it alone. You give us no hint what it is, if it is gas, you might (notice - Might) like to fog it. Diesels are best left alone. There is a way to fog a diesel, but don't do it if you don't know how.
3 - If you have reliable shore power available, I feel maintenance charging is best. If not, fully disconnect them. Both main engine and house banks. (Take pictures if there is more than a single cable removed.
4 - Good luck with this one. Try everything, we have had no success with Irish Spring or Dryer sheets, some with Cab Fresh, peppermint oil and mint leaves. Not much is 100% sure.

Matt


Matt & Mary Colie
A sailor, his bride and their black dogs going to see some dry places that have Geocaches in a coach made the year we married.


gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 12/06/18 08:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Exercise your generator (if equipped) under a load once a month for about 30-40 minutes.

I keep out 96 Southwind plugged in to shore power 24/7 when not being used.

jfkbunkie

Chicago

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Posted: 12/06/18 02:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the replies. Are all in agreement that covering is not necessary in the wintertime?

Also, has anyone had experience with spraying the ground with ammonia around the perimeter to keep mice away?

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 12/06/18 03:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jfkbunkie wrote:

Thanks for the replies. Are all in agreement that covering is not necessary in the wintertime?

Also, has anyone had experience with spraying the ground with ammonia around the perimeter to keep mice away?


I think covering is based on preference but a couple things to consider - aside from is being a huge pain to take on and off in the summer let alone winter;
If you plan to travel at all in the winter, snow and ice are a royal PITA to deal with and the cover is on. Also, covers can rub the paint and the buckles can scratch.

I had a cover once, used it for about a month before a few things happened. I got tired of putting it on and removing it, if there was snow or ice it can bond to the RV making it tough and dangerous and possibly damaging to try and remove it, the buckles scratched and in decent wind the cover started to tear. Add to the difficult task of storing it while not in use and if it's wet then what?

All in all the cover simply had far more issues than benefit - if any. Winter exacerbated the issues.

RodLyle

Almost Heaven

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Posted: 12/20/18 01:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have owned 4 different Class A over a 33 yr period.

Have done this every month in that time.

1. Take out on road for 50 mile round trip.
2. Run generator for 45-50 mins with load
3. Level
4. Extend slideouts
5. I use a battery tender on marine batteries

NOTE: I try to extend and level on a decent day temp wise.

Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 12/20/18 03:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the RV is going to be parked for the Winter you do not need (do not want!) to start the engine UNLESS you are also planning to take it for a long drive. You must get all fluids up to operating temperatures and that cannot be done without a drive.
You do not need to run the generator either if it will be sitting for the same extended period of time. If you plan to use it at all then you will need to run it under load for at least 1/2 hour.
If the coach will not be plugged in to allow the batteries to be maintained then you should use the 12V shut off, take pictures, mark and draw diagrams of all battery connections and then remove and store them. Assuming they were fully charged when you removed them you do not need to keep them on a charger but just keep them out of freezing temps until you are ready to reinstall.
Personally, I don't think you need to cover the coach. Unless the cover is absolutely secure (unlikely) when the wind blows the cover will move. Everwhere the cover moves and touches the coach body you will have unnecessary wear. A good cleaning and waxing before storing will have it ready for a good cleaning in the Spring with no damage.
Rodents? I've got nothing other than try to ensure that every exterior opening is sealed.


What I post is my 2 cents and nothing more. Please don't read anything into my post that's not there. If you disagree, that's OK.
Can't we all just get along?

jfkbunkie

Chicago

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Posted: 12/21/18 08:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for the additional replies. I have my RV uncovered now based on advice given. No power outlets readily available, so I need to determine a solution for the house batteries. Even with the disconnect, I know they won’t last through the winter. Any thoughts regarding complete removal vs. running the generator to keep them charged?

Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 12/22/18 07:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Personally, I would make sure they are fully charged and then remove them. It will take less time than you will spend returning to the RV every couple of weeks to run the generator and it will make your life pretty easy. They don't need to be put on a charger at home, just keep them in a space where they won't freeze. Reverse the process in the Spring and you are ready to travel.

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