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 > Leak-free Class-C?

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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 12/30/18 09:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If it is an RV it will leak. Class C with windows on the front of the cab over are worse than those without. Clearance lights are an issue, too.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 12/30/18 09:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Mine is 43 years old and it has not had a cabover leak. Regular maintenance (e.g., caulking windows and seams) will prevent leaks.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

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Posted: 12/30/18 10:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

the RV should be stored (not used) out of the sun and rain.

It's hard to overstate the importance of this. Sure, not everyone has room for a cover, but I see plenty of folks who spend 6 figures for a rig, but won't spend 6 thousand to protect it. If a rig springs a leak and is exposed constantly, the damage is ongoing. With a cover you can catch it early and save the situation. As a buyer, look first to sellers that have their rig covered, and these folks probably also inspect regularly cause they care. The average bill for damage to an overhead cab leak is $7000, ironically more than the cover they should have bought. The new one piece overhead is a good improvement, but the joint where it meets the roof needs an inspection yearly. Also the overhead cab lights. I'm sure there are plenty of uncovered C's that are fine, but they only come with owners who care and stay on top of it. As a side note, there is a RV salesman, when taking a C in trade, asks the owner right of the bat "where is your leak?".

* This post was edited 12/30/18 10:20am by T18skyguy *


Retired Anesthetist. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. 2017 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS .Wife and daughter. Three cats which we must obey. Thorp T18, tons of tools and tons of junk.

wildtoad

Blythewood, SC

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Posted: 12/30/18 10:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you get anything marked “RV” sooner or later it will leak. Leaks are not limited to Class C’s.


Tom Wilds
Blythewood, SC
2016 Newmar Baystar Sport 3004

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 12/30/18 12:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

T18skyguy wrote:

As a buyer, look first to sellers that have their rig covered, and these folks probably also inspect regularly cause they care.


Not always true. There are many posts from folks who put their RV under cover and then never bothered to look at them until spring only to find a leak had destroyed the rig.

The ideal owner does regular maintenance to prevent leaks, checks out their rig throughout the rainy/snow season regardless of where it's kept to identify any leaks early, and takes action to stop any leaks as quickly as possible.

However, no matter how on top of things a owner might be, there is always room for a leak to happen - whether the owner got ill or injured, there was a death or divorce in the family, or maybe just got caught up in work... Sometimes life gets in the way.

I have found that a roof vent leak is an easy fix. If the owner catches it early (which is usually easy to do because it's right in the open), then it may show a small water stain still but had been dealt with promptly and effectively with some basic caulking.

A leaky seam or window is different. The water is more likely to have drained down the side of the RV, doing additional damage along the way. It's harder to see because you have cabinets, beds, couches, etc., blocking your view of the leak and so it goes longer before detection. And repair is a lot more involved.

theoldwizard1

SE MI

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Posted: 12/30/18 09:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MDKMDK wrote:

Agreed. Build quality, roof material/design, and maintenance are the issues that affect whether or not a particular roof will leak or not.

I would change the order to roof material/design, build quality and then maintenance.

If the first two are done to top notch standards, the third item is almost non-existant !

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

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Posted: 12/30/18 11:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

toedtoes wrote:

T18skyguy wrote:

As a buyer, look first to sellers that have their rig covered, and these folks probably also inspect regularly cause they care.


Not always true. There are many posts from folks who put their RV under cover and then never bothered to look at them until spring only to find a leak had destroyed the rig.

The ideal owner does regular maintenance to prevent leaks, checks out their rig throughout the rainy/snow season regardless of where it's kept to identify any leaks early, and takes action to stop any leaks as quickly as possible.

However, no matter how on top of things a owner might be, there is always room for a leak to happen - whether the owner got ill or injured, there was a death or divorce in the family, or maybe just got caught up in work... Sometimes life gets in the way.

I have found that a roof vent leak is an easy fix. If the owner catches it early (which is usually easy to do because it's right in the open), then it may show a small water stain still but had been dealt with promptly and effectively with some basic caulking.

A leaky seam or window is different. The water is more likely to have drained down the side of the RV, doing additional damage along the way. It's harder to see because you have cabinets, beds, couches, etc., blocking your view of the leak and so it goes longer before detection. And repair is a lot more involved.


Quote:

Not always true. There are many posts from folks who put their RV under cover and then never bothered to look at them until spring only to find a leak had destroyed the rig.

If that's true I would like to see their cover. Some folks put a few pieces of tin up and call it good, when it's very little protection from sun or blowing rain. Another possibility is they had a major leak in progress during a trip, didn't notice it, put the rig under the cover, and discovered it later and said the cover was inadequate. I have a 32 foot rig under a 40x14x12 foot cover, full back and full left side enclosed, and halfway down the right side. The rig sits 8 feet in and I've had a few drops blow on the front but that's it Nothing on top ever.

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 12/31/18 04:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

T18skyguy wrote:

toedtoes wrote:

T18skyguy wrote:

As a buyer, look first to sellers that have their rig covered, and these folks probably also inspect regularly cause they care.


Not always true. There are many posts from folks who put their RV under cover and then never bothered to look at them until spring only to find a leak had destroyed the rig.

The ideal owner does regular maintenance to prevent leaks, checks out their rig throughout the rainy/snow season regardless of where it's kept to identify any leaks early, and takes action to stop any leaks as quickly as possible.

However, no matter how on top of things a owner might be, there is always room for a leak to happen - whether the owner got ill or injured, there was a death or divorce in the family, or maybe just got caught up in work... Sometimes life gets in the way.

I have found that a roof vent leak is an easy fix. If the owner catches it early (which is usually easy to do because it's right in the open), then it may show a small water stain still but had been dealt with promptly and effectively with some basic caulking.

A leaky seam or window is different. The water is more likely to have drained down the side of the RV, doing additional damage along the way. It's harder to see because you have cabinets, beds, couches, etc., blocking your view of the leak and so it goes longer before detection. And repair is a lot more involved.


Quote:

Not always true. There are many posts from folks who put their RV under cover and then never bothered to look at them until spring only to find a leak had destroyed the rig.

If that's true I would like to see their cover. Some folks put a few pieces of tin up and call it good, when it's very little protection from sun or blowing rain. Another possibility is they had a major leak in progress during a trip, didn't notice it, put the rig under the cover, and discovered it later and said the cover was inadequate. I have a 32 foot rig under a 40x14x12 foot cover, full back and full left side enclosed, and halfway down the right side. The rig sits 8 feet in and I've had a few drops blow on the front but that's it Nothing on top ever.


My disagreement was with the idea that an owner who puts their rig under cover cares more and checks it out more frequently. Many owners will put it under cover and not look at it until the next season - that is not caring for the RV more than a person who stores it outdoors and checks it after every rain, etc.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 12/31/18 09:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My B+ as some care to call it, the Itasca Cambria, has the entertainment center up front and the fiberglass shell. I watch as it bounces along while traveling down the road.
How many RV owners, new and seasoned, store items in their class C with the bunk while traveling causing the issue of leaks and cracks to be even further guaranteed. It is a nice large space and can be tempting.My guess is the folks that don't store items in the bunk while traveling have less leaks.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 12/31/18 10:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The bottom of our cabover area's floor is cutout part-way (so you can raise up out of the cab seats to go back to the coach) and mates securely to a matching cutout in the cab's steel roof. In fact in looks very much like the cab's steel roof helps to support the cabover - in addition to the aluminum struts in the cabover walls themselves that are of course extensions of the aluminum joists and runners used in the entire coach area's walls and ceiling.

How can our cabover area "bounce independently" if it's bottom rides right on - and is attached to - the Ford cab's steel roof? Especially how can it bounce relative to the coach's sidewalls that are the same piece of vertical material making up the cabover's sidewalls?

I'm almost about to use the word "impossible" relative to any cabover up/down movement separate from the Ford cab roof itself. I've never seen our cabover "move separate from" the main coach structure ... and I sure hope that our whole coach never moves relative to the main chassis steel frame beams that it's bolted to and that support it.

However, we did once own a Class C in which the cabover floor was separate from the cab's intact steel roof. There was 2-3 inches of air between the outer surface of cabover floor and the cab's steel roof (just like in a truck camper). I suppose in that case, the cabover could sometimes bounch a little vertically separate from the cab, but even then we never experienced any leaks in the cabover sleeping area.

What I don't trust to not need leak over time are: The five forward facing clearance lights in the cabover, and the forward facing cabover window seal for those of us unlucky enough to have one. When our Class C is in uncovered storage out in the back yard, I'm very careful to keep it parked it in the shade so that the sun cannot shine on the cabover window or on the clearance lights. The sun's UV rays are a killer to just about any sealing material - so shade or a roof covering are essential to keeping an RV's roof areas sealed up tight.

We also long ago installed vent covers over our roof vents so that UV rays wouldn't cause the plastic crank-up vents to crack and leak water. These covers over the vents also help to keep water away from the screwed-down and sealed vent frame itself so as to help prevent leaks in that area.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca 324V Spirit

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