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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Weighing rv

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Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 01/07/19 01:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DP


Huntindog
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Tvov

CT

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Posted: 01/07/19 04:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As far as I can tell in Connecticut, gates close off the highway scales when they are not being used by DOT / State Police. When they are being used, it is mandatory that commercial trucks stop at the scales, and there is a line of trucks and a bunch of officers there. People would not be happy if a camper pulls in to get different weights.

My town uses a "transfer station" for garbage - garbage trucks and personal vehicles hauling garbage are weighed, they dump into a hopper, garbage gets hauled away to a trash-to-energy plant. At slow times, usually late afternoon, the place is almost empty. If you ask the scale operator, and are polite about it, they are perfectly happy to let anyone weigh pretty much anything at no charge.


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2008 F-250 CrewCab 5.4L,
2004 21' Forest River Surveyor


deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 01/07/19 07:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

frisbeekev wrote:

This is a silly question I am sure, but here it goes. I know you can weigh your rig at a truck stop on their scales. I was wondering if you can use those random truck scales on the side of the highway or do they frown upon that?


I do it all the time in WA.... when the scales are closed.

If the scales are open and in use by a line of truckers, keep going.

WA leaves the scale display rotated around for outside viewing specifically so people can randomly stop and weight their rigs.


2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
2009 Arctic Fox 811 (bought new 11/9/09)
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rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 01/07/19 10:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The real world number for my rig across the CAT scales for my last trip were.

Total truck axel weights equaled 6500#
Total truck and trailer weight 13,080#
So, the weight of trailer was 6580#
Weight of trailer axels 5740#
Weight transferred to WD hitch was 840# about 13% of trailer weight.

The truck's yellow door sticker shows 15,000# max total load, 7200# max total truck axel weight.

Trailer manufacturer's sticker shows gross trailer weight of 7500#

2011 F-150 towing guide states a max trailer weight for my truck is 9800# with 10 to 15 percent on the tongue. However the max WD hitch weight is 1130#.

While I am nowhere nears truck or trailer total limits, I have found I need to watch the rear axel weight. Not because of the WD weight but because of all the camp gear I load into the truck bed that should be carried it the camper.

The CAT scales are your friend when it comes to long distance trips.


Twenty six foot 2010 Dutchmen Lite pulled with a 2011 EcoBoost F-150 4x4.

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Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

The real world number for my rig across the CAT scales for my last trip were.

Total truck axel weights equaled 6500#
Total truck and trailer weight 13,080#
So, the weight of trailer was 6580#
Weight of trailer axels 5740#
Weight transferred to WD hitch was 840# about 13% of trailer weight.

The truck's yellow door sticker shows 15,000# max total load, 7200# max total truck axel weight.

Trailer manufacturer's sticker shows gross trailer weight of 7500#

2011 F-150 towing guide states a max trailer weight for my truck is 9800# with 10 to 15 percent on the tongue. However the max WD hitch weight is 1130#.

While I am nowhere nears truck or trailer total limits, I have found I need to watch the rear axel weight. Not because of the WD weight but because of all the camp gear I load into the truck bed that should be carried it the camper.

The CAT scales are your friend when it comes to long distance trips.
These figures, though they may be "real", may not mean anything if it was not weighed properly..

What is the TW WITHOUT WD engaged? That is just for starters. Gotta go to work now, but you can look up the right way to do this on the forum


* This post was edited 01/08/19 08:08am by Huntindog *

rbpru

North Central Indiana

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Posted: 01/08/19 10:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My point is the tongue weight without the WD hitch means little. Unless you have enough weight to bend the frame.

If the the tongue weight is 1000# or 1500#. The purpose of the WD hitch is to redistribute some of that weight from the rear truck axle, to the front truck axle and the trailer axles.

If the hitch is set so the truck and trailer sit level, and all the axle weights are within spec, I am set to go. (Actually I use the yellow sticker max cargo rating, as it is a bit less than the sum of the truck's axle ratings).

If you have enough tongue weigh to bend the frame, you have other issues.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 01/08/19 11:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

My point is the tongue weight without the WD hitch means little. Unless you have enough weight to bend the frame.

If the the tongue weight is 1000# or 1500#. The purpose of the WD hitch is to redistribute some of that weight from the rear truck axle, to the front truck axle and the trailer axles.

If the hitch is set so the truck and trailer sit level, and all the axle weights are within spec, I am set to go. (Actually I use the yellow sticker max cargo rating, as it is a bit less than the sum of the truck's axle ratings).

If you have enough tongue weigh to bend the frame, you have other issues.
You either believe in the ratings, or you don't.

You stated that the max WD hitch weight is 1130#.

If you are really (you never come right out and say it) over 1130# before engaging WD, then you are over the rating... Probably of the hitch itself, but that is just a guess.

You state that your weight transferred to WD (really no such thing) is 840#.

That means that you are really close to being over the rating when you measure the TW properly...

Thou doth protest too much..... I think you are over the limit, and don't want to admit it.

Will it cause you a problem being a little over?? Who knows.

You either believe in the ratings or you don't.

But do not fool yourself, and worse encourage others to do the same by using your measuring methods.

Weigh it right. Know the truth. Then either believe in the ratings, or don't.


drsteve

Michigan

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Posted: 01/08/19 02:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rbpru wrote:

My point is the tongue weight without the WD hitch means little. Unless you have enough weight to bend the frame.

If the the tongue weight is 1000# or 1500#. The purpose of the WD hitch is to redistribute some of that weight from the rear truck axle, to the front truck axle and the trailer axles.

If the hitch is set so the truck and trailer sit level, and all the axle weights are within spec, I am set to go. (Actually I use the yellow sticker max cargo rating, as it is a bit less than the sum of the truck's axle ratings).

If you have enough tongue weigh to bend the frame, you have other issues.


The WD hitch is a lever that distributes load to the front axle, and some to the TT axles. The tongue weight remains right where it is, and must be accounted for.

If your TT had zero tongue weight, and you hitch up with a WD hitch, the spring bars will STILL distribute load from the rear axle of the truck to the front, and some to the TT axles, and a scale would show that. The bars do not distribute tongue weight. Tongue weight is not even part of the calculation.

This subject has been beaten to death around here. There is a lengthy sticky at the top of the Towing subforum that covers this in great detail. There used to be a diagram that illustrated how it all works, but I do not know if it survived the Photobucket purge.


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BarneyS

S.E. Lower Michigan

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Posted: 01/08/19 05:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I fixed the sticky with the diagram again. [emoticon]
Barney


2004 Sunnybrook Titan 30FKS TT
Hensley "Arrow" 1400# hitch (Sold)
2019 Ram Limited 1500, 5.7L Hemi, 4x4, SB
Not towing now.
Former tow vehicles were 2016 Ram 2500 CTD, 2002 Ford F250, 7.3 PSD


trailer_newbe

Tucson

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Posted: 01/08/19 07:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My sig says trailer newbe. I like it, but I’m not a newbie anymore. Two trailers and two trucks and many miles traveling I’m not an expert, but no longer new to this game. Gas engine is all about RPM and HP. A diesel is all about torque. You can get up the hill using RPM and down the hill using RPM. Diesel gets up the hill with torque and down the hill with diesel breaking (Both, much more effective). A 1/2 ton truck has less overall weight suspension, axel and breaks. A 3/4 ton has more weight axel and breaks. When the wind hits on the highway the difference between a 1/2 ton and a 3/4 ton is like night and day. Don’t make the mistake I made over the years. Buy the trailer you want, then buy the truck to tow it. Ive been down the justification road for towing with a 1/2 ton, but if you are justifying, you are already conceding the argument.


2018 Jayco White Hawk 28RL

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