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 > Structual Repair with metal components

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biggjb

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This is more a theoretical question as I have not seen posts pertaining to using steel 2x4s to replace rotten wooden ones. My camper has some significant repairs and I thought about trying to incorporate metal frame components in order to reduce weight. I can see a problem if the wooden part only needs to be partially replaced, however, if the whole component requires replacement could one use a metal component in its place? Any thoughts would be welcome.

camp-n-family

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How is a steel 2x4 going to save weight over a wooden one?


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Kayteg1

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2x4 aluminium angle is way lighter than 2x4 fir and much stronger, water resistant and such.
That said where do you see 2x4 in the camper?
I did extensive front end repairs on my Fleetwood and the thickest wood member was 3/4".
Than the slide support on my Lance sag and broke off on 1 end. The wood construction used .75 x 2.5 wood, but it is beech, so much stronger than fir.
Reinforced it with aluminium angle as well, who hid conveniently under siding.
That said such repairs are not easy as going from metal to wood frame require some engineering.
It is not for just anyone.





ppine

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Welded aluminum. Find someo0ne that is good at it. If it is a small job you could probably screw and bolt it together.

gbopp

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Posted: 01/07/19 12:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've read that there is a concern in Tiny Houses, screws in metal studs vibrate loose while being towed. And they are towed less than a RV.
Welding or nuts and bolts would be an option.

I've done a few small projects with metal studs, they're really easy to work with as opposed to wood.
But, for what you plan, wood may be a better choice.

ticki2

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Posted: 01/07/19 12:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

biggjb wrote:

This is more a theoretical question as I have not seen posts pertaining to using steel 2x4s to replace rotten wooden ones. My camper has some significant repairs and I thought about trying to incorporate metal frame components in order to reduce weight. I can see a problem if the wooden part only needs to be partially replaced, however, if the whole component requires replacement could one use a metal component in its place? Any thoughts would be welcome.
There will be almost no weight savings between metal suds and wood studs . There will be some difficulty using both in the same wall . Metal studs will transfer more heat and cold . Metal strapping and cleats at joints will greatly strengthen the wood framing and repairs . That's about 2 cents worth .

* This post was edited 01/07/19 12:38pm by ticki2 *


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biggjb

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Posted: 01/07/19 06:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

These are all very good comments. As the newer TC have a metal(aluminum) frame I thought I could use some while making repairs to my Fleetwood. As it turns out it now makes sense for me to just stick with wood. I have measured some of the framing and I have some places where it is 1-1/2 X 2-1/4. However, most of the frame is 1x1, 2x2 or 1x3. Thanks everyone for your comments and I think I'll stick wood. My next question now is what type of wood. I read in one beech was used. I was thinking of pine, pressure treat of course.

Kayteg1

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Posted: 01/07/19 11:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You should not use pressure treated wood in sleeping quarters.

Grit dog

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Posted: 01/08/19 10:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Depends what you're replacing and what it's supporting.
I'd use hardwood in structural locations. Use whatever in low stress areas.


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joerg68

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Posted: 01/09/19 01:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Do not use PT wood in the camper. It can be highly corrosive due to the chemicals used. So the wood may hold up, but may cause issues with any metal parts around it, such as aluminum siding. See https://galvanizeit.org/hot-dip-galvaniz........-does-hdg-last/contact-with-treated-wood for more info, or just google "pt wood corrosion".

It also used to contain arsenic, but this has been banned for about 15 years now, so any PT wood currently on the shelves should no longer contain any.
See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chromated_copper_arsenate for more info if you like. However... the chemicals now used for the purpose may or may not be safer, I do not know.

ETA: this document has some impressive images of steel vs. PT lumber:http://www.ggashi.com/wordpress/wp-conte........ads/PT-Lumber-Causes-Steel-Corrosion.pdf

* This post was edited 01/09/19 01:25am by joerg68 *


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