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 > Structual Repair with metal components

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Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 01/09/19 09:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In deck construction pressure treated wood require "hot dip galvanized" brackets and fasteners.
Beside harmful fumes, most of PT wood is secondary quality lumber, so its strength is not the best.
For job like that I go to Home Depot and run via pallet of lumber to find 4 nice and dense pieces.
Still see it old houses where lumber has density that will bend the nail, or shear a screw.





Cannon George

Ojai, CA

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Posted: 01/10/19 06:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting question, I agree wood as you indicate is probably best in your case. Structurally, what the framing member is doing stress-wise is important. Section modulus and moment of inertia properties vary widely between wood and aluminum box or C-channels, and for a camper application I expect a lot of off-axis loads - not to mention transient and sub-transient dynamic shock loads - which defy a static analysis performed when sitting level while parked.

Retro-fit framing repairs introduce possibility of inadequate load transfer capacity as compared to original framing design (whether documented or not) (and potential liability issues)

I've previously asked/looked for actual stress analysis/design figures used for framing design from manufacturers; naturally most are hesitant to provide this.

I've seen and repaired buckled square Al tubing on campers before, when failure is tracable to a known cause (ie, accident) that is preferable to failures with no obvious reason.

free radical

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Posted: 01/10/19 08:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

biggjb wrote:

These are all very good comments. As the newer TC have a metal(aluminum) frame I thought I could use some while making repairs to my Fleetwood. As it turns out it now makes sense for me to just stick with wood. I have measured some of the framing and I have some places where it is 1-1/2 X 2-1/4. However, most of the frame is 1x1, 2x2 or 1x3. Thanks everyone for your comments and I think I'll stick wood. My next question now is what type of wood. I read in one beech was used. I was thinking of pine, pressure treat of course.

Id use lightest wood available and laminate/glue few thin strips together to make any thickness you want,need,that would be stronger then single piece of wood

Gluing aluminum to wood can be done also,however requiers very expensive epoxy..plus very expensive special caulking gun..

jefe 4x4

West Slope, Northern Sierra Nevada

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Posted: 01/10/19 10:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I had a leak under the propane compartment door that dry rotted the wood framing underneath, I asked my RV guru dude the same question. The former owner turned the tie downs too tigh pulling down the bottom frame. My guru discouraged use of multi materials and simply peeled back the sheathing, and cut out the offending wooden framing and (industrial) STAPLED the 1x2's back together, just the way the factory made it.
As fasteners, screws, NBW's, and glue do not work and will not last. I've gotten another decade out of his repair.
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jefe


'01.5 Dodge 2500 4x4, CTD, Qcab, SB, NV5600, 241HD, 4.10's, Dana 70/TruTrac; Dana 80/ TruTrac, Spintec hub conversion, H.D. susp, 315/75R16's on 7.5" and 10" wide steel wheels, Vulcan big line, Warn M15K winch '98 Lance Lite 165s, 8' 6" X-cab, 200w Solar

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 01/11/19 09:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don't think I would sleep well having wood joint under main holding bracket. New wood suppose to go to the corner where you have metal reinforcement.
Than stapled frame calls for well glued siding for shearing strength.
One more way to repair partially rotted wood is laminating.
Some epoxy will soak rotten wood, giving it new strength and couple layers of fiberglass will make structural strength. It is messy job, so takes some practice, but with excelent results.

Jack Spratt

Maine

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Posted: 01/11/19 06:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

In deck construction pressure treated wood require "hot dip galvanized" brackets and fasteners.
Beside harmful fumes, most of PT wood is secondary quality lumber, so its strength is not the best.
For job like that I go to Home Depot and run via pallet of lumber to find 4 nice and dense pieces.
Still see it old houses where lumber has density that will bend the nail, or shear a screw.


Ceramic coated screws are the preferred choice for pt lumber


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