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memtb

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Posted: 01/30/19 10:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Byork wrote:

memtb wrote:

twodownzero wrote:

I would only look at tires made in the USA. Hankook tires are often made in Korea. Check before buying.


The Korean Hankooks have a very good reputation in the trucking industry. Now, some Hankooks are outsourced to Chine, and I have no information on their quality. I just make certain where the Hankooks I purchase, where from Korea!


I thought I read that Hankooks were made in Tennessee? I could be wrong.
I put Hankooks on my RV mid summer of 2018 and they were all dated from early 2018, just a few months old. I haven't put many miles on them yet, but I'm happy so far. FWIW


It probably depends upon the tire. We’re running 19.5’s on our truck. The DH07’s, a grip/drive tire are made in Korea, which we use all the way around as we have a 4x4.:The AH11’s (steer tire) were made in China!


Todd & Marianne
Miniature Schnauzer's - Sundai, Nellie & Maggie Mae
2007 Dodge Ram 3500, 6.7 Cummins, 6 speed manual, 3.73 ratio, 4x4
2004 Teton Grand Freedom, 39'
2007 Bigfoot 30MH26Sl


Byork

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Posted: 01/31/19 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

memtb wrote:

Byork wrote:

memtb wrote:

twodownzero wrote:

I would only look at tires made in the USA. Hankook tires are often made in Korea. Check before buying.


The Korean Hankooks have a very good reputation in the trucking industry. Now, some Hankooks are outsourced to Chine, and I have no information on their quality. I just make certain where the Hankooks I purchase, where from Korea!


I thought I read that Hankooks were made in Tennessee? I could be wrong.
I put Hankooks on my RV mid summer of 2018 and they were all dated from early 2018, just a few months old. I haven't put many miles on them yet, but I'm happy so far. FWIW


It probably depends upon the tire. We’re running 19.5’s on our truck. The DH07’s, a grip/drive tire are made in Korea, which we use all the way around as we have a 4x4.:The AH11’s (steer tire) were made in China!


Ok, yeah those are a much bigger tire than the 16" on my class C.


2000 Chevy Yellowstone Sport 30', class C


pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 01/31/19 12:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Byork wrote:

memtb wrote:

Byork wrote:

memtb wrote:

twodownzero wrote:

I would only look at tires made in the USA. Hankook tires are often made in Korea. Check before buying.


The Korean Hankooks have a very good reputation in the trucking industry. Now, some Hankooks are outsourced to Chine, and I have no information on their quality. I just make certain where the Hankooks I purchase, where from Korea!


I thought I read that Hankooks were made in Tennessee? I could be wrong.
I put Hankooks on my RV mid summer of 2018 and they were all dated from early 2018, just a few months old. I haven't put many miles on them yet, but I'm happy so far. FWIW


It probably depends upon the tire. We’re running 19.5’s on our truck. The DH07’s, a grip/drive tire are made in Korea, which we use all the way around as we have a 4x4.:The AH11’s (steer tire) were made in China!


Ok, yeah those are a much bigger tire than the 16" on my class C.


You comment in the last sentence depends upon what you mean by a "bigger tire". If you mean tire width, then yea, maybe 19.5 inch rims can fit wider tires

However, if you mean tire diameter (or tire height), then probably much taller tires can be fitted on your 16 inch rims than what came stock on your RV.

Our Ford E450 based Class C motorhome's tire wells can accept way taller tires than what came stock on it. For years I have been running taller tires on our Class C's 16 inch rims to as to get more ground clearance all around. Changing of the rims was not necessary at all.

Additionally, say we for example compare two tires that are 34 inches in diameter - one on a 16 inch rim and one on a 19.5 inch rim. Which one do you think will ride better carrying a given weight, at a given air pressure, and with a given suspension? I'm betting that the tire on the 16 inch rim will ride better because it has a greater sidewall tire material height to expand/compress more on bumps - between the road surface and the solid metal of the rim.

For the life of me, I cannot see why so many trucks nowadays have large rims with skinny sidewall tires on them. They must really ride hard. I see the need on race cars to reduce sway on curves at high speeds with strong side forces (and we all know how stiff race cars ride) ... but for common vehicle use???

(I have three vehicles, and all have tires with smaller rims combined with large air chamber tires for a great ride and good ground clearance.)

* This post was last edited 01/31/19 01:15pm by pnichols *   View edit history


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

memtb

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Posted: 01/31/19 01:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pniichols, I can see nothing wrong with your logic. When I originally got involved on this posting, I thought I was on the 5th wheel site( senility has it’s downfalls)....we have both a class c and a 5 th wheel. When I mentioned the 19.5’s, I was referring to the truck, thinking I was on 5th wheel site! . We haul very heavy loads with a SWD truck, another topic for another day. The 19.5’s allowed us to have “much” greater rear load rating.

When we put “new shoes” on our class c, we will do the same as you. A much taller, 16” tire, and recalibrate the speedometer. We’re running 4.30 gearing, taller tires will be a huge plus in many ways!

pnichols

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Posted: 01/31/19 01:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

memtb wrote:

pniichols, I can see nothing wrong with your logic. When I originally got involved on this posting, I thought I was on the 5th wheel site( senility has it’s downfalls)....we have both a class c and a 5 th wheel. When I mentioned the 19.5’s, I was referring to the truck, thinking I was on 5th wheel site! . We haul very heavy loads with a SWD truck, another topic for another day. The 19.5’s allowed us to have “much” greater rear load rating.

When we put “new shoes” on our class c, we will do the same as you. A much taller, 16” tire, and recalibrate the speedometer. We’re running 4.30 gearing, taller tires will be a huge plus in many ways!


I'm curious ... how do you recalibrate the speedometer without spending money for a repair shop to do it via the OBD2 connection?

Our speedometer only reads about 1 MPH slower, so I have just left it as is.

By the way, of course when you go up in tire diameter on the 16 inch rims you usually wind up with tires that have higher per tire weight rating. Hence you get maybe a quadruple bonus using your stock 16 inch rims with taller tires: 1) More ground clearance, 2) a better ride, 3) slightly better gas mileage from making the overall drive ratio a bit taller, and 4) increased tire life due to less tire tread revolutions per mile.

My Ford E450 Class C came with the usual stock 225/75R16 LR E tires. I now run 215/85R16 LR E tires on it. I use the same tire pressures, use the stock 16 inch rims, get the same per tire load ratings, and gain about a 1.2 inch larger tire diameter for an increased 0.6 inches of ground clearance.

Another very subtle bonus is that the 215 tires are just a bit narrower - for better cooling air flow in between the sidewalls on rear dually sets during hot weather and for slightly more pounds per square inch downward pressure on all six tires that improves traction and steering via being able to better push through the slick layer to rougher material on wet or snowy road surfaces.

Larger diameter tires are always a better way to go. Even towables should, IMHO, come stock with larger diameter tires than what is commonly found on them.

* This post was edited 01/31/19 02:58pm by pnichols *

memtb

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Posted: 01/31/19 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I concur. We like narrow tires for a multitude of reasons, one being they seem to work better in snow.....which we see a bit. I was just using the assumption that we would see a greater mph change, and the correction would be wise. When we got our rig, it had already been computer chipped....and while I haven’t actually checked, I figured that the tire size was reprogramable. If not needed.....all the better! The only bad thing, of course “not” spending money is not really a bad thing”.....it had brand new tires when we bought it last August. It will be a while before we get the much needed ground clearance with taller tires. When we win the lottery [emoticon].....it will get a 4x4 conversion, which will cure most any clearance issues, as well as low range for those steep grades and boat removal from slick ramps!

pnichols

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Posted: 01/31/19 03:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

memtb wrote:

I concur. We like narrow tires for a multitude of reasons, one being they seem to work better in snow.....which we see a bit. I was just using the assumption that we would see a greater mph change, and the correction would be wise. When we got our rig, it had already been computer chipped....and while I haven’t actually checked, I figured that the tire size was reprogramable. If not needed.....all the better! The only bad thing, of course “not” spending money is not really a bad thing”.....it had brand new tires when we bought it last August. It will be a while before we get the much needed ground clearance with taller tires. When we win the lottery [emoticon].....it will get a 4x4 conversion, which will cure most any clearance issues, as well as low range for those steep grades and boat removal from slick ramps!


Is your current rig a Class C?

Our 24 foot E450 Class C can still crawl along great with it's 4:56 rear differential, even though I've countered that slightly with the taller tires.

The one thing I don't like about 4X4 conversions is the lifting of the whole rig, thus doing something you don't want - creating a higher overall center of gravity. You want everything as low as possible in a 4X4 for off-highway use - EXCEPT the undercarriage and suspension/drive components. Increasing tire diameters thus does just what you want - raising undercarriage and suspension/drive components for rough roads while at the same time not raising the overall center of gravity any more than absolutely necessary.

We take our Class C into the Oregon and Utah back country with, so far, no problems - but we we do have to travel slow when off-highway with it.

memtb

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Posted: 01/31/19 05:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols, It would be a minor lift, no more than 4”! This thing, body, frame, steps,etc. are so low, you couldn’t pass over a small turtle without contact. Certainly understand the center of gravity elevation change, but for our uses and desires....this thing is near useless. We much prefer the roads “less” traveled by rv’ers. We will have to respect the higher potential “roll-over” risks involved! We’re not looking for a “rock crawler” just something we can travel on a mild “two-track” for some boondocking/ hunting/ fishing/ hiking, etc!

pnichols

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Posted: 02/02/19 05:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

memtb wrote:

pnichols, It would be a minor lift, no more than 4”! This thing, body, frame, steps,etc. are so low, you couldn’t pass over a small turtle without contact. Certainly understand the center of gravity elevation change, but for our uses and desires....this thing is near useless. We much prefer the roads “less” traveled by rv’ers. We will have to respect the higher potential “roll-over” risks involved! We’re not looking for a “rock crawler” just something we can travel on a mild “two-track” for some boondocking/ hunting/ fishing/ hiking, etc!


I assume that you're talking about your 2007 Bigfoot 30MH26Sl?

If so, then I'm guessing that the length of it - instead of it's traction - may be the biggest limitation to going on some two-track roads (in dry weather) to/from off-highway camping sites.

Our 24 foot Class C - with it's slightly larger diameter tires - now has about stock pickup truck road surface clearance, including all under-floor coach components. Also, it's relatively short wheel base length also helps to provide some high-centering protection.

I actually prefer it's rear duallies on rutted two-tracks because, if I take it easy, I can steer carefully so as to keep each rear tire up onto the upper sides of the ruts instead of having single rear tires that ride right down into the ruts. Driving this way with duallies decreases the chance of suspension and drive line components scraping the road surface between the ruts in the road.

However, driving off-highway with a Class C above all else requires driving very slow - unlike being able to blast along in a highly lifted 4X4 vehicle with it's long-throw shocks and suspension. That's especially a problem way out there when a "true off-road" vehicle comes up behind and wants to pass a Class C on a two-track with nothing but soft surfaces on each side of the road! [emoticon]

memtb

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Posted: 02/02/19 08:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols, Yes, wheelbase is our biggest enemy, rear hangover, not so much! We went down a “very” tame two-track this past summer, it required some very careful navigation to prevent dragging. We came within less than an inch (much less) from an exhaust pipe contact. It will never be an off-road vehicle, but with our clearance....it’s barely a parking-lot speedbump vehicle. In it’s present configuration, it virtually eliminates our desired uses. While an inch or so isn’t much, it would certainly help. We really love the unit, it is certainly more at home in a paved parking lot, than a dirt/rock road! [emoticon]

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