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 > Stand-alone GPS or smartphone?

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Dick_B

Palos Heights, IL USA

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Posted: 02/11/19 11:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I like our GPS mounted on the dash that I can glance at without taking my eyes off the road for more than an instant.


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Dutch_12078

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Posted: 02/11/19 11:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our primary GPS is a Garmin Nuvi, and I have the Co-Pilot app on my phone as a backup. No matter which GPS setup you use, never set the options for the "Shortest route" or similar. Instead, use the "Fastest route" or similar setting. The shortest route can follow the cows to the barn if it saves a few feet, while the fastest route may be a bit longer but will save time, usually by routing over better roads. That "Shortest route" setting is what got at least one of those families that were trapped in snow on unmaintained forest service roads in trouble along with their lack of common sense.


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lhenry8113

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Posted: 02/11/19 12:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For us the GPS is the way to go. Our Magellen RoadMate has a 7" screen, Audio is great as well as the mapping directions. Works well with Detour routes, too.


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Gjac

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Posted: 02/11/19 12:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After spending a small fortune on various stand alone GPS systems and facing another purchase for a new RV Garmin I tried the Copilot app for $6.99 which allows you to input your height for low bridges and stay away from propane restricted areas. This is automatically updated unlike my previous Garmin's. You don't need cell service for for your phone gps systems to work. Maps are downloaded and your cell phone has a built in GPS. For me it was an easy decision $600 vs $6.99. I mount my phone using an old Garmin suction cup mount.

JaxDad

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Posted: 02/11/19 01:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

I prefer using a cell phone--but there are times when there is no cell signal--in mountains etc.


GPS uses a satellite signal, not a cell network signal.

I routinely use my smart phone GPS when I'm WELL out of cell service. As a pilot I'm often "out of service" at only a few thousand feet up.

You just have to have the map database on the phone itself instead of something that needs to fetch the maps as you move along.

pinesman

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Posted: 02/11/19 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use my phone sometimes for specific things near where I am at. However, if you mount your phone and leave it working the entire time, it will burn a mountain of data. Don't ask me how I know. I have also run into the problem of no reception at the one place I need it to work. I know they may not be the favorite on here but I have never had a problem with my TomTom

Bumpyroad

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Posted: 02/11/19 02:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

I prefer using a cell phone--but there are times when there is no cell signal--in mountains etc.


a Garmin gps is my preferred device.
some of you are addicted to your "smart" phone however.
bumpy





Airdaile

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Posted: 02/11/19 02:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Android tablet on a Verizon data plan with CoPilot RV and Waze running all the time. The issue with a standalone GPS is that you freeze yourself in the tech timeline. If come out with some new tech, you usually can't just update a standalone unit. With a tablet, just download the new app.

EV2

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Posted: 02/11/19 03:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JaxDad wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

I prefer using a cell phone--but there are times when there is no cell signal--in mountains etc.


GPS uses a satellite signal, not a cell network signal.

I routinely use my smart phone GPS when I'm WELL out of cell service. As a pilot I'm often "out of service" at only a few thousand feet up.

You just have to have the map database on the phone itself instead of something that needs to fetch the maps as you move along.


True, but you better have a ton of memory available for the maps if you wish to have the whole country unless you want to continually swap data maps with destinations around the country:

garmp

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Posted: 02/11/19 03:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a Garmin for the majority of our driving and major guide, but in conjunction with our android tablet and ATT hot spot. Paper maps are also still onboard. The tablet really comes in handy for fine tuning the final turns, etc, but also eats up the data. Tablet is also better, IMHO, than the GPS for finding eateries on/near the route.
So yes, we use both.


Our Phoenix Cruiser 2100, "Bob", has turned us from campers into RVers and loving it!


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