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Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 02/15/19 08:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a 2004 Tioga 26Q, bought new in 2003, had to replace roof AC unit, fridge, fresh water pump , awning fabric and minor stuff after about ten years. I think there is a spike in major item replacements at about the ten year point. Of course you'll need to replace tires every 5-6 years. After that, a well maintained rig shouldn't need big dollar fixes for another ten years, your experience may be different. T'would be interesting to see cost comparisons on trading up for a new rig every 8-10 years vs keeping a rig repaired for 20 years. Many wouldn't want to keep a rig for 20 years unless they had indoor storage facilities to keep it looking newish.

TyroneandGladys

Chandler AZ

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Posted: 02/17/19 02:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

IMHO using a power management unit that protects us from low voltage,pedestal issues and surges has prevented untold number of repairs. Example we were camping with a group and our unit kept shutting off due to low voltage when mentioned to a member in our group he stated that the unit shutting off the power was to much of a inconvenience. Found out later in the following 6 months he replaced the TV, microwave, A.C., board on the refrigerator, and the converter.


Tyrone & Gladys
27' 1986 Coachmen


77rollalong

Brighton Ontario

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Posted: 02/18/19 12:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Owning an older RV can be a lot of work. We have a 1977 roll-a-long 26 foot motor home that we bought 2 years ago, that I ended up replacing all the walls and the roof, new awning, the first year we had it the only major problem we had was I had to rebuild the carb, the previous owner had replaced all the tires, new batterys, and the ac unit. our last trip last fall the furnace quit working, repaired the ignitor circuit, then the fan relay went bad, but its working again.. we will see how the next season goes I guess
[image]

Harvey51

Alberta

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Posted: 02/26/19 02:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our camping vehicle before the MH was a 1992 GM 2500 van pulling a pop up. The first thing was the starting motor, which failed in a parking lot 3 blocks from home. I managed to replace it myself right where it was parked. At about age 20, we lost the heater core while camping in Jasper Park. We limped to Rocky Mountain House where we found a nice little garage recommended by Canadian Tire. They couldn’t fix it for two weeks and the estimat was $700. I asked if they could patch it up so we could drive home. They did - just connecting the input hose to the output hose. I managed to replace the heater core myself with some advice from friends. The next year the alternator and water pump failed. The mechanic friend replaced them for me. No problems since then except routine brake work.

Our 2004 class C purchased in 2008 has not seen a garage so far. I only recall replacing the engine thermostat and belts. Also a broken house drain pipe elbow and some roof leaks.


2004 E350 Adventurer (Canadian) 20 footer - Alberta, Canada
No TV + 100W solar = no generator needed

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 02/28/19 01:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a 1975 class C.

As Chum Lee points out, you're paying for it either way.

I tend to look at my clipper more as a "house" purchase than a "vehicle" purchase. Meaning, when things start needing repairs, I repair them knowing they will be fixed for another X years. I don't sell my house because the water heater went out, so I don't sell the RV when something goes out.

And, even with a rebuilt engine, new carb, and new fuel tank, I have still put out less money than I would have spent buying a new rig - which would likely have issues needing to be dealt with under warranty.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 02/28/19 06:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I recall a TV comedian who said, "This is the very same axe that George Washington used to cut down the cherry tree. It has had three new heads and five new handles, but it is the same axe!"


1991 Oakland 28DB Class C
on Ford E350-460-7.5 Gas EFI
See Profile for House electronics set-up.

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 02/28/19 08:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Big Katuna wrote:

There is definitely a ten yearish honeymoon period.
I can see that, especially if storing your rig outdoors in less than ideal conditions.

When not in-use, our (purchased new) 2007 rig stays indoors in our heated garage.
The garage being partially under-ground & under-house, the rig is also kept relatively cool in the summer. 12ish years and ~40k miles so far, our troubles have been nil except for batteries of both sorts over the years and one set of replacement shocks last summer. There have been monetary interior things hardly worth mentioning. Most of my work on the rig is what I call improvements, not repairs.

But during the next year or two I will be going through preventative maintenance on the chassis changing fluids. The most expensive thing coming up will be new tires and Alcoa wheels.....the wheels being another enhancement.

We hope to keep our rig until we are too old and dangerous to drive it which we estimate is still 25 years away. So our plan is in the ball park of 37 years of ownership. I hope our rig goes easy on me. As long as I can do most of the work myself, we should be okay. But if it's a serious money pit later, then we'll have to give it up early.


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


tragusa3

upstate south carolina

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Posted: 03/01/19 04:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ron, I wonder what percentage of owners have a goal that far out? We happen to be one. I'm 49 and we just bought a 7 year old rig in excellent shape with only 9k miles on it. We keep ours in covered storage and hope to make it to about age 70. This would put our rig at 28 years at that point.


New to us 2011 Tiffin Allegro Open Road 34TGA
Join us on the road at Rolling Ragu on YouTube!


ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 03/01/19 07:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

tragusa3,

We do seem to be the "rare few" with plans for such a long ownership.

Back in 1983 we became parents at the age of 25. We loved camping and decided to buy a new motor home for easier parenting during our travels. The rig we bought SEEN HERE was extremely simplistic and also affordable. It was more like a conversion van than a motor home. It was our second car the first 7 years. We owned it for 24 years. It would have continued to serve us well if not for us getting older and needing more facilities. So with that experience along with my continued determination, I hope we can keep OUR RIG TODAY until we are done with such travel style. If we are done with our house at the same time, because the motor home fits inside it, I could see us including the motor home as a bonus to sweeten the sale of the house. But like I say, we hope that is many years away when we just can't live life the same way.

My wife and I are both determined people to keep things going. Our washer and dryer lasted over 35 years. The fridge we bought in 1978 still serves us part time during the holidays. My MTD Ranch King lawn tractor is 30 years old and continues to serve me well. Our 30 year old house still has the original furnace, air conditioner, hot water heater, and water softer. We have been in process of replacing our original furniture that dates back to the late 70's. People who buy it from us on CL loves it all because of style and condition. But we love our new Amish replacements. We turned 60 last year and I think we both still wear a few articles of clothing that date back to high school. We are not pack rats. Everything has it's place. We designed and built our house to fit into our life style of Mr. & Mrs. Frugalfixit. It's our way of life to get the most from stuff.....within reason. So we hope this motor home will serve us until we are done with the travel style.

I should include that we also know how and when to make changes. We retired our Windows 98, Millennium, and XP computers along with our 56k modem at the right times. We don't have any CRT TV's in the house. We don't dress "70's". Hey, we even have S8 and S9 smart phones. [emoticon] [emoticon] [emoticon]

* This post was last edited 03/01/19 07:53am by ron.dittmer *   View edit history

maillemaker

office

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Posted: 03/05/19 07:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our RV is a 1990 Winnebago Warrior Class C.

Our roof was shot - previous owner had coated the entire thing in Heng's Roof Sealant or similar. I just do the same thing and it's mostly water-tight. Had a leak in the sunroof over the shower but I just gooped over the cracks.

Headliner disintegrated - I pulled it all down and glued up fiberglass paneling.

Fresh water pump died; I replaced it.

Control board in water heater died; replaced with Dinosaur Electronics board.

Control board in fridge died; replaced with Dinosaur Electronics board.

Had to have cab AC fixed and converted to new refrigerant.

Genset didn't work when we got it 10 years ago - $500 to fix.

Just replaced all electronics on the genset last year - $500 more.

Had to replace Ignition Control Module for engine last year.

Had to replace radiator last year.

Had to have engine water pump replaced a few years ago.

You better be handy or have money if you have an old RV.

I'd like a newer one but we'll never be able to afford another one so I just keep it limping along.

Steve


1990 Winnebago Warrior. "She may not look like much but she's got it where it counts!"



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