RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Bio-diesel / Is it a good or bad thing for the engine ?

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Bio-diesel / Is it a good or bad thing for the engine ?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
thomas201

Eastern Panhandle WV

Senior Member

Joined: 08/21/2014

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/27/19 07:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bio has fewer BTU's per gallon, so you will take a small MPG hit. I worked for a rendering plant as the plant manager for about 5 years. We could not make the math work for producing our own biodiesel. It was worth too much as chicken feed. However, we were happy to sell it to others.

wq93

usa

New Member

Joined: 09/10/2017

View Profile



Posted: 02/27/19 07:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bio helps provide some of the lubricity lost with the switch to ULSD years ago. I have been using it in my diesel pickups for years without trouble and my circa 1995 Deere utility tractor uses it also with no problem. My soon to be delivered 40KW standby generator will also be running a bio blend.

Your biggest issue will be it has higher cloud and gel points than non-bio and vehicles designed for higher concentrations will generally have a larger capacity fuel heater at the filter. Bio diesel is a little better solvent than straight diesel and an older fuel system first introduced to bio will likely need a filter change fairly soon for the first cycle.

You have probably run bio before without knowing it because it has been prevalent in most of the market for over a decade.

I hate "farmer gas" ethanol fuel but I am fine with bio diesel (which also makes far more sense economically and environmentally than the ethanol laced garbage fuel).

naturist

Lynchburg, VA

Senior Member

Joined: 04/24/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 02/27/19 08:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You are going to get a LOT of contradictory information and advice here asking that question. I can only tell you that most of what is/will be said is tainted by unsubstantiated opinion.

But I will tell you facts. I have had three diesels, two that were supposed to only use no more than 5% biodiesel, and the third no more than 7%. All three have been run at higher concentrations without incident. One of the 5%ers has 180,000 miles, of which around 100,000 miles was more or less continuously at B20 to B50, with occasional brief periods on B100. At around 125,000 miles the injection pump started leaking and had to be replaced. It should be noted that this seems to have happened to others of its type that have never run biodiesel, so I'm not sure it had anything to do with biodiesel.

The second, another 5%er, ran for around 50,000 miles on B20-B50 without incident. At 150,000 miles, an overheating incident while towing caused a blown head gasket and cracked head, which was replaced. At 200,000 miles, the last being with no biodiesel, the rebuilt head with new valves, dropped an exhaust valve killing the engine. Clearly the biodiesel had nothing to do with the dropped valve.

The third, and newest of them now has 110,000 miles, and though officially limited to B7, has seen an occasional tank of up to B20, without skipping a beat. This vehicle is the only one of the three with a DPF.

There are strongly opinionated people who will insist that a single tank of 5% biodiesel is the reason their radio no longer works. I know this, because I've met them.

Frankly, my own personal experimentation has resulted in my own opinion that use of biodiesel has no untoward consequences for engines, enough so that I don't worry about it at all.





Bedlam

PNW

Moderator

Joined: 06/13/2012

View Profile






Posted: 02/27/19 08:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My 6.0 Powerstroke liked running on B10 due to the additional lubricity in the fuel and I actually got better mileage with it than running straight ULSD with a friction modifier. If I remember correctly, that era of Powerstroke was only certified for B5 even though I ran a greater bio mix. My 6.7 Cummins is rated for B20 and I see no difference in performance or mileage between B20 and straight ULSD.


Chevy Sonic 1.8-Honda Passport C70B-Host Mammoth 11.5-Interstate Car Carrier 20-Joyner SandViper 250-Kawasaki Concours ZG1000-Paros 8' flatbed-Pelican Decker DLX 8.75-Ram 5500 HD-Tank Urban Touring 150SE-VW TransBuggy 1200


Durb

NW

Senior Member

Joined: 01/15/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/27/19 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My state (Washington), and probably Oregon also, mandates a minimum of 2% biodiesel. They can add up to 5% of bio and still call it #2 diesel. No getting away from it.

goducks10

There

Senior Member

Joined: 02/22/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/19 08:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I ran it twice in my 12 CTD. Zero issues. In fact it sounded nicer and seemed to run smoother. I needed some diesel at the coast and the only station in the area was B20 IIRC. I only put in enough to get me to home. The other time was pretty much the same circumstances.

schlep1967

Harrisburg, PA

Senior Member

Joined: 12/08/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/27/19 10:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No preference either way but the correct answer is, "Read the owners manual for your vehicle."
It will tell you what you can run.


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 Diesel
2009 Open Range 385RLS
Pull-Rite Super Glide

T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 12/13/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 02/27/19 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you all, you guys are teaching me a lot. I am in Oregon, and the button on the pump said S15. Had never seen that before. I have a 2016 Duramax, so I better read the manual. My rig has only 3600 miles on it, and I have changed oil once, but not fuel filter. I better look into it. I need to find out how often the fuel filter needs changed. We got a foot of snow now. I can wait a bit. I don't drive it much right now.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. 2017 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS. Wife and daughter. Three cats which we must obey.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 05/06/2013

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/19 12:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If it comes out of the pump it’s ok in your truck. Nothing to worry about in your sitch.


03 Arctic Fox 860
07 Dodge 2500 deezul
"Obviously I don't want to overload my truck and be unsafe, but the reality is the truck is way more capable than the 10K GVWR they put on the sticker.
KJ"

ktmrfs

Portland, Oregon

Senior Member

Joined: 06/22/2005

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 02/27/19 01:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Durb wrote:

My state (Washington), and probably Oregon also, mandates a minimum of 2% biodiesel. They can add up to 5% of bio and still call it #2 diesel. No getting away from it.


Oregon mandates 5% bio. Many states mandate 2-5% bio diesel. I suspect you would be hard pressed to find many places with NO (0%) biodiesel,

Now biodiesel does have a slightly lower energy content. I say slightly since it is on the order of 1-2% lower. However bio has a higher Cetane rating, and better lubricity.

Personally I run B20 when I can find it, and in oregon B20 is exempt from state fuel tax so often costs less than B5

And on my 04.5 duramax I noticed that with B20 (yes I know they say don't use it in the 04) in cold weather less diesel rattle when cold or accelerating, likely from the higher cetane rating,

* This post was edited 02/27/19 02:49pm by ktmrfs *


2011 Keystone Outback 295RE
2004 14' bikehauler with full living quarters
2015.5 Denali 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison
2004.5 Silverado 4x4 CC/SB Duramax/Allison passed on to our Son!


Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Bio-diesel / Is it a good or bad thing for the engine ?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tow Vehicles


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS