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billtex

RI

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Posted: 03/04/19 07:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ski camping rocks;
[image]
[image]
[image]

* This post was edited 03/05/19 05:35am by an administrator/moderator *


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bb_94401

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Posted: 03/04/19 11:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CptSydor --

While my goal was to have my truck and TC setup to handle whatever weather came my way, be self sufficent, and have all the comforts of full utilities, it took lots of iterations and improvements to get there.

Initially I was like the majority of RVs that you see at various ski areas over a weekend. Fully winterized, lines drained and only using the heater. Basically camping in the TC and using bathrooms at the ski resort.

What showed whether the changes I had made would allow me to safely start using more utilities, in what conditions, was using several wireless (actual/min/max) thermometers and a good battery monitor like a Trimetric. Nothing like data under various conditions with my TC setup vs. peoples opinions on what to do and whether it was effective.

Initially just identify the coldest / vunerable areas inside the TC with multiple thermometers. A FLIR infrared camera would be very useful, if you had access to one, but it is pretty easy to feel the cold drafts, when it is blowing outside.

After finding the coldest spot, then monitor the min/max for the inside temp., outside temp, the coldest spot, along with how many A-hr were used over a weeked under various conditions. A-hr used for the weekend will give you an idea of battery bank size needed. A-hr also acts as a surrogate for propane use, if you are running LED lights. Alternately you can just weight the tanks before heading out and after returning on a bathroom digital scale, or some other way of assessing propane level in the tank.

If you frequent ski areas that have reserved electrical hookups, or you have enough generator capacity to run two 1500W supplemental electrical heaters (one for the basement), you can start using water and see how it goes. Alternately, if you live in snow country, you can set temperature alarms, experiment and gather lots of information in your own driveway. In addition to using the search fucntion on this forum, take the time to talk to the other RVs in the parking lot and ask what problems they have had and how they solved them.

Finally, the rule of thumb for survival when exposed to extreme environments is 3-4 hours. You'll need plans/equipment for various contingencies. You'll find that cell phone coverage is spotty at best for a lot of the highways and roads to ski areas in northwest US and Canada. A SPOT, PLB (personal locator beacon, FastFind or ResqLink) or Garmin InReach will allow you to contact Search and Resque personnel in case of a life threatening emergency for yourself or others.


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smooth1

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Posted: 03/07/19 05:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The best alarm clocks are the ski patrol guys doing avalanche control work at 7am while you are nice and cozy in the resort parking lot.

Heat and batteries are the two big issues. You will find places for your skis inside your camper or truck, or outside under the vehicle.

A lot of campers/trailers use the catalytic (buddy style) heaters and leave two windows cracked open which really saves your batteries. You have to leave one or two windows open anyway or the condensation from the gear drying and you breathing will collect on the ceiling and drip.

We just use the camper furnace for our heat, and two group 31 batteries is plenty of amps for one night. For the second night we run the generator for two hours to give the batteries a quick charge for the second night.


Another note: we went to Stevens Pass last month and it looks like Vail Resorts is going to convert their RV lot to car parking. Not sure if there will be RV parking up there anymore.

free radical

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Posted: 03/07/19 09:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fwiw
I find rather silly people sugesting leaving the windows open to get the moisture out.
Heating great outdoors is not my cuppa tea.
Drawbacks of using propane I guess

Why not get a heater that blows DRY hot air in the first place.

I use Espar,dry heat and very eficient..although bit pricey

Now fortunately theres much cheaper Chinese diesel available that is exact copy of Espar,so should work just as well hopefully.
many RVers convert their rigs to use them

https://youtu.be/ogLmROa1o9E

https://youtu.be/3j5qW9kKBLM

arto_wa

S.W. Washington State

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Posted: 02/07/21 09:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

free radical wrote:

Fwiw
I find rather silly people sugesting leaving the windows open to get the moisture out.
Heating great outdoors is not my cuppa tea.
Drawbacks of using propane I guess

Why not get a heater that blows DRY hot air in the first place.

I use Espar,dry heat and very eficient..although bit pricey

Now fortunately theres much cheaper Chinese diesel available that is exact copy of Espar,so should work just as well hopefully.
many RVers convert their rigs to use them

https://youtu.be/ogLmROa1o9E

https://youtu.be/3j5qW9kKBLM




Espar type Diesel heaters are great, but what's wrong with having some ventilation - are you against it?


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Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 02/07/21 09:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Campers have ventilation naturally.
I parted old camper and when I did notice earlier that electric cable box was venting the air under bathroom sink, it took parting out to notice big floor holes around the drainage pipes, who were never sealed.
I installed Chinese diesel heater in my latest conversion. They are very energy saving and quiet.
When propane heater makes coming on and off rocket, diesel heater adjust the speed depends on heat demand, idling slowly when heat is on low demand.
Have seen motorhome owners installing it with small tank that comes with it. When some smell can be an issue, you are avoiding low temperature issues and can fill it with 50-50 mix of kerosene/diesel.





ticki2

NH

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Posted: 02/07/21 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

free radical wrote:

Fwiw
I find rather silly people sugesting leaving the windows open to get the moisture out.
Heating great outdoors is not my cuppa tea.
Drawbacks of using propane I guess

Why not get a heater that blows DRY hot air in the first place.

I use Espar,dry heat and very eficient..although bit pricey

Now fortunately theres much cheaper Chinese diesel available that is exact copy of Espar,so should work just as well hopefully.
many RVers convert their rigs to use them

https://youtu.be/ogLmROa1o9E

https://youtu.be/3j5qW9kKBLM


It’s not the traditional propane heater that is causing the moisture , they are vented outdoors , it’s the occupants and the cooking and the washing . Espar is a nice system but it doesn’t solve the moisture problem .


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rider997

California

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Posted: 02/07/21 12:16pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:

free radical wrote:

Fwiw
I find rather silly people sugesting leaving the windows open to get the moisture out.
Heating great outdoors is not my cuppa tea.
Drawbacks of using propane I guess

Why not get a heater that blows DRY hot air in the first place.

I use Espar,dry heat and very eficient..although bit pricey

Now fortunately theres much cheaper Chinese diesel available that is exact copy of Espar,so should work just as well hopefully.
many RVers convert their rigs to use them

https://youtu.be/ogLmROa1o9E

https://youtu.be/3j5qW9kKBLM


It’s not the traditional propane heater that is causing the moisture , they are vented outdoors , it’s the occupants and the cooking and the washing . Espar is a nice system but it doesn’t solve the moisture problem .


And being that this is a skiing thread, all of the damp or snowy jackets, gloves, and other ski apparel that are being brought into the camper to warm up and dry out...

arto_wa

S.W. Washington State

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Posted: 02/07/21 02:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

...............zip.....................I installed Chinese diesel heater in my latest conversion. They are very energy saving and quiet.
When propane heater makes coming on and off rocket, diesel heater adjust the speed depends on heat demand, idling slowly when heat is on low demand.
Have seen motorhome owners installing it with small tank that comes with it. When some smell can be an issue, you are avoiding low temperature issues and can fill it with 50-50 mix of kerosene/diesel.




This is interesting and I would like to know more if you don't mind please?

Could you post photos of your installation?

Where did yo locate the Diesel fuel tank, or are you using the main Diesel fuel tank?

I assume there is no propane heater at all in your conversion?
Is it a van conversion or...?

What size unit is it kW or BTU?

Any idea how many amperes it draws when it's operating (at 12 V)?
Any amp. draw when it's off (I hope not!)?


I have a two speed propane heater in my slide-in camper and it is still pretty noisy at the low speed.

Any information would be appreciated.

* This post was edited 02/07/21 04:12pm by arto_wa *

Kayteg1

California > Nevada

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Posted: 02/07/21 08:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My conversion is Sprinter van, who has front seats pedestal and that is where the heater fits perfectly.
My van already had aux fuel pickup, so I used it, but reading how low temperatures affect heater priming and that the aux pickup ends at about 1/4 fuel tank, I am keeping the heater tank as spare.
It is 5 kW heater. I don't have much use on it yet, so don't know all the specs, but when running on low speed, it suppose to draw ca 1 amp.
The 5 l (1 gallon, 1 quart) tank suppose to last for 2-3 days.
tons of youtube videos about those heaters.
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