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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Tires LT 225/75R16 load range E

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ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 03/09/19 01:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi jcsb,

You did not include some critical information for me.
- What chassis model and year?
- What RV brand, model, and year?
- What tire pressure you operate at with consideration to your actual load
- How do you store your rig when not in-use, indoor, outdoor?

Our rig.......
- Less than 24 feet long
- 158" wheel base
- Operating tire pressure 65psi.
- Rig stored in climate control year round
Because our operating load is significantly less than max, and our storage conditions are ideal, we safely extend the use of our tires. I am "pushing" it, ready to buy new tires before our next major trip out west. I am embarrassed to say that the Michelin tires on our 2007 E350 are all the originals. No bulges, no cracks, no flats (no patches), all has been well. They have 40,000 miles on them with decent thread remaining, even-wear on the 4 rears, not so much on the 2 lighter-loaded fronts from failed front shock absorbers.

If you have a max-load very heavy rig running 80psi in any of the tires, I would consider those higher "E" rated tires which handle an additional ~500 pounds per tire. They have a "C" in the code. Some need 90psi to handle the max load, others need only 83psi. The 83psi tires work with the standard 80psi steel rims on E-series. They would surely be worth a looking into.

* This post was edited 03/09/19 01:31pm by ron.dittmer *


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


VA-Apraisr

glen allen, VA

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Posted: 03/09/19 03:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I use XPS rib Michelin tires due to steel sidewall construction and same tires on most UPS/FEDEX trucks. Needing new tires this year as 5 years has rolled around again and tread life is still excellent. Just have always felt safer with Michelin tires on my vehicles and especially going 60mph in a 28' motorhome. I do air down to 20psi when driving on the beaches of NC and another reason for the steel sidewall construction protection. All 6 tires will cost around $1700+ to install but just another cost of ownership.

Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 03/09/19 06:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ron,

While we agree on most things your continued use of 11+ year-old tires gives me the willies... I know you know better. Your operating load and storage conditions in no way mitigate the fact that tires time out. I hope I am wrong but IMHO: yours are a disaster just waiting to happen.

Given the critical interface between your rig and the road which = "tires' I cannot imagine pushing the envelope much less to such an extreme. I wish you luck but obviously you have already had your share...

But enough thread drift, go buy a new set of Michelins! [emoticon]

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]





ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 03/09/19 06:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

Ron,

While we agree on most things your continued use of 11+ year-old tires gives me the willies... I know you know better. Your operating load and storage conditions in no way mitigate the fact that tires time out. I hope I am wrong but IMHO: yours are a disaster just waiting to happen.

Given the critical interface between your rig and the road which = "tires' I cannot imagine pushing the envelope much less to such an extreme. I wish you luck but obviously you have already had your share...

But enough thread drift, go buy a new set of Michelins! [emoticon]

As always... Opinions and YMMV.

[emoticon]
All is well between us Desert Captain!

I knew I had it coming while writing that my tires are turning 12 years old this spring. I hope you and all the rest of the gang understand that I am not trying to convince everyone to run their motor home tires anywhere near as long as I do. I am "extreme" in that regard and know it so, so much to the point of my embarrassment in mentioning it. But my storage situation is also out of the ordinary. I found it interesting that my garage smelled like new tires for the first seven years, the aroma specifically coming from the motor home. Maybe I am 4 to 5 years over-due.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/10/19 11:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hang in there Ron!

I personally feel that there's a bit of a fear factor that's common regarding RV tire life - which nicely helps the bottom line of tire manufacturers. Probably a lot of this comes from the TT and 5'er RV world - which does scare me because of the extreme loads that their small diameter and high-rotational-speed tires have to tolerate from the extra heat generated via sidewall flexing. Of course sometimes only four tires on the TTs and 5'ers ... instead of our six Class C tires ... are having to carry the load and absorb the sidewall-flex heating.

Since Michelin has changed the material formulation of their common LT Load Range E RV tires (now called their "Defender" line), it looks like their premature sidewall cracking problem has been solved.

Our Class C's Michelins are probably coming up on five years this year and like your even older tires, show no signs at all of "being old". I run a full 80 lbs. in the rear to keep heating at a minimum back there.

FWIW, my 4X4 pickup's tires are 10-12 years old and sill have gobs of tread left and no sidewall cracking or bulges, but they are a large diameter to minimize rotational speed, and about the heaviest loads they carry is only around 1/2 cubic yards of quarry rocks in the bed or the tongue weight of a loaded horse trailer. This truck sits out in the weather all the time - and it's paint job looks far older than it's tires.

Other than dry rot and the sun's UV rays, it's sidewall flexing and the subsequent generated heat that ruins tires ... and I'm thinking that the generated heat from travel may be the worst.

All IMHO, of course.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

RambleOnNW

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 03/10/19 03:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Michelin recommends yearly inspections after 5 years and replacement at 10 years for their entire line. They have a detailed write up here:
https://www.michelinman.com/US/en/help/do-I-need-new-tires.html

Our C rides on commercial grade all-steel cased Bridgestone Duravis tires and are about 5.5 years old. Not sure how long we will keep them, perhaps 8 years. Looking at the Bridgestone Duravis R238 as a replacement when the day comes.

Had the tires inspected and had one dismounted while looking for a slow leak. Perfect condition inside and out (suspect TPMS sensor for slow leak).


2006 Jayco 28', E450 6.8L V10, Bilstein HDs,
Roadmaster Anti-Sway Bars, Blue Ox TigerTrak

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 03/10/19 04:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There is a local (not sure if Fed or Prov law) that tire shops can't repair a tire over ten years old. I found that out last year with the 1991 C we got that later had a nail in a back tire episode. They would not even use my spare, saying it was over ten. Had to get four new tires at the back (my choice instead of just one new one)

IMO a certain amount of common sense should apply rather than a dogmatic replace at 5 years. Those guys that put bags over their tires when parked must be thinking that. (But having a bag over your ten + year old spare won't help around here unless you do the tire replacement job yourself [emoticon] )


1991 Oakland 28DB Class C
on Ford E350-460-7.5 Gas EFI
See Profile for House electronics set-up.

dicknellen

Fallon Nevada

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Posted: 03/10/19 06:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree, the tires I just replaced were 7 to 10 years old. Not sure where the 5 year rule came from.

Lumpty

Greater Gotham City

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Posted: 03/12/19 03:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Last year I had this same conundrum, and went with Cooper Discoverer HT3's. Have about 10k miles on them and no complaints. If I'd done Michelins it would have been me and a friend doing the swap while busting and balancing all 6 in his shop garage. I got the Coppers for less money installed by a tire store than us doing the labor buying from TireRack. Very similar tread pattern to the old Michelin LTX's, but with solid ribs on the outsides.

I replace every 5 years, which is about 40k miles.


Rob

Too Many Toys.
- '11 E450 Sunseeker 2300
- '16 F150 Supercrew 5.0/FX4
- '09 C6 Z51
- '15 VW Golf Sportwagen daily driver
- '86 Civic and '87 CRX race cars

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/15/19 01:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I "think" Cooper tires used to be made in the U.S. ... are they still?

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