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suprz

rhode island

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Posted: 03/10/19 06:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just because they are pretty expensive, I was wondering, if you could only get and install one at a time, would you get the Helwig front or rear sway bar first? My coach is a 2006 E450 Super Duty / 31ft Jayco Greyhawk. It had the usual handling issues they all have.


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bobndot

USA

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Posted: 03/10/19 06:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes you could, one at a time. You have to talk to someone and describe the symptoms .
My new 450 was being pushed by bow waves and crosswinds and was wondering. I called Rvupgradesstore and was advised to install a rear track bar to stabilize the chassis to the rear axle which would correct my issue. It worked . They advised in my case, the sway bars would be overkill.

Desert Captain

Tucson

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Posted: 03/10/19 08:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Assuming you never bothered with a proper test drive where the handling issues would have been clearly apparent before you bought into this problem... all is not lost. The place to start is the simplest and happily also the cheapest...

Load the coach as you would for a normal trip and get to a CAT scale. Weigh the rig and take those weights to your tire manufacturers Load Inflation table. Inflate your tires for the load they are actually carrying {Ignore any sticker found in the coach and the max psi numbers on the sidewalls} and then take another test drive. Chances are good you will immediately notice a huge improvement in the ride and handling and all it cost was about $10.

If you are still having issues being pushed around by trucks and crosswinds find an alignment shop that knows trucks and RV's. You may need some additional caster with the front right needing a tad more than the left. During a proper alignment, any worn parts issues should be disclosed and you can repair or replace as needed. For a couple of hundred bucks at the high end, you have probably solved your handling issues.

"IF" you still have issues it is now time to explore aftermarket add ons that may or may not work but will undoubtedly be very expensive. Do your homework and shop wisely adding one piece at a time until you are satisfied with the overall result.

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Hank85713

Tucson, Az

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Posted: 03/10/19 09:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As noted above tire inflation is one of the components. Like you I thought of aftermarket stuff but went with inflation of tires and REAR AIR BAGS! You do have airbags correct? I run mine around 55-60 PSI and it made a great difference and with the better tire inflation it did help. Give it a try 1st.

suprz

rhode island

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Posted: 03/10/19 11:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My coach did not come with air bags

Harvard

51.6N 114.7W

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Posted: 03/10/19 02:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

These E350/E450 Cutaways can come off the assembly line
with +3 to +4 degrees of Caster. Those settings are
OK for city driving BUT you want to have +5 to +6 degrees
of Caster for highway driving, OTHERWISE:

POPULAR MECHANICS MAY 1973:
START QUOTE:
If too little caster exists, the car will wander and weave,
thus necessitating constant corrections in steering.
END QUOTE:

Hank85713

Tucson, Az

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Posted: 03/10/19 09:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

suprz, ther is no great issue with installing a set. Check with local rv houses and see what they want for a set, then look at others such as summit racing, autozone, pep boys etc. Not hard to install if you are capable mech but would need to pull wheels on each side to install. Good year has a set for rvs, as does airlift. If all else fails check with an independent shop to see what it would cost to have them installed. Still much less than a dealer or rv shop most likely.

pauldub

North of Seattle

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Posted: 03/11/19 07:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First, adjust the tire pressure based on actual weight. Second, have it aligned with MAX caster. Third, report back with any remaining symptoms.

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 03/11/19 09:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

suprz,

I would do the front stabilizer bar first because the bar itself is terribly under-rated for the application, the poorly engineered end donut bushings wear out quickly, and you have the huge cab-over bed that catches the wind.

A free improvement would be to inspect or rather tighten your stock Ford rear stabilizer bar end links. Make sure there is no "play" in the stack of washers and rubber bushings. Tighten them up to cause a little compression in all the rubber end-link bushings. Between a new heavy duty front stabilizer bar, and tightening the end links in your stock rear stabilizer bar, I hope you will feel a noticeable improvement. That is the mission.....noticing an improvement. If it's better but not yet good enough, then later replace the stock rear stabilizer bar with a heavy duty Helwig and consider heavy duty Bilstein shocks.

READ THIS on my experience with the shocks on our 2007 E350 chassis. Included are many pictures clarifying things. You can inspect your shocks for such a failure by simply jacking up your front end and looking at the top of your front shocks as shown in the pictures. You can also check your front shocks for effectiveness by following the test procedure outlined at the end.

But before doing anything, READ THIS first.

* This post was last edited 03/11/19 10:43pm by ron.dittmer *   View edit history


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


suprz

rhode island

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Posted: 03/12/19 04:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ron.dittmer wrote:

suprz,

I would do the front stabilizer bar first because the bar itself is terribly under-rated for the application, the poorly engineered end donut bushings wear out quickly, and you have the huge cab-over bed that catches the wind.

A free improvement would be to inspect or rather tighten your stock Ford rear stabilizer bar end links. Make sure there is no "play" in the stack of washers and rubber bushings. Tighten them up to cause a little compression in all the rubber end-link bushings. Between a new heavy duty front stabilizer bar, and tightening the end links in your stock rear stabilizer bar, I hope you will feel a noticeable improvement. That is the mission.....noticing an improvement. If it's better but not yet good enough, then later replace the stock rear stabilizer bar with a heavy duty Helwig and consider heavy duty Bilstein shocks.

READ THIS on my experience with the shocks on our 2007 E350 chassis. Included are many pictures clarifying things. You can inspect your shocks for such a failure by simply jacking up your front end and looking at the top of your front shocks as shown in the pictures. You can also check your front shocks for effectiveness by following the test procedure outlined at the end.

But before doing anything, READ THIS first.


Thank you for the help. I did replace the rear sway bar links last year with Moog replacement links with urethane bushings. Can't say I have noticed much if any difference though. I agree that the front sway bar bushings / bar etc is at best inadequate.

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