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 > Anti-freeze ratio

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drsteve

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Posted: 03/13/19 07:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RV antifreeze is slippery and smelly. It is meant to be used full strength, diluting it makes it less effective.

I would not use water that contained antifreeze for any purpose.


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rhagfo

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Posted: 03/13/19 07:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

chast wrote:

Sorry for confusion guys! We would like to continue to be able to use the fresh water and drainage systems when the temps are freezing at night and OK during the day. We NEVER drink the water from the tanks and the water would only be used for dishes, showers and toilet. So, how much antifreeze do I need to add to 35 gallons (the non-toxic RV type) to achieve this?


Well the RV anti-freeze, doesn't really stop the freezing, it will freeze to a slush, and NOT expand so fitting are not damaged.
You would likely be better off just using bottled water.


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MDKMDK

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Posted: 03/13/19 08:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

chast wrote:

Hey All—traveling to the great frozen Northeast in our B-van and expect temps in the 20’s at night. Would like to continue to use the fresh water system and want to add RV antifreeze to the tank. What do you think a safe ratio would be to prevent freezing the outside tank and lines? The tank is 35 gallons.

What year/make/model of B van is it, if I may ask? Some B vans are better suited for withstanding cold temps. What does your owner's manual say about camping in freezing temps?

Anecdotally,
Our 2002 Roadtrek was pretty good at handling freezing temps for short periods overnight. The plumbing was Pex, lines and joints, which had a little room for expansion if the water started to freeze/expand. We usually just tried to keep the inside of the van heated overnight as best we could, opened cupboards to allow some warmer air to reach the plumbing where possible, ran the W/H to keep the tank from freezing, and put some RV A/F in the black/gray tanks via the usual access points (toilet, galley sink). In 9 years of occasional sub freezing temps, we never had a problem.
If the overnight temps start regularly getting below the low 20s Farenheit, with the daytime temps close to freeze, you might want to consider doing a quick blow out winterize of the fresh water system. If your fresh tank is external to the coach interior, I would drain it. Then use bottled water for your fresh water needs.
Good luck with it.


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Posted: 03/13/19 08:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bobbo wrote:

It should be 100% water, or 100% antifreeze, or empty. Your choice.


Disagree - there's never any reason to introduce RV antifreeze into any fresh water holding tank, ever. When not in use during the cold weather months it should simply be drained of any residual water and left like that, as should the water heater tank, any water remaining will have plenty of room to expand as it freezes and not cause any issues at all.


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garym114

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Posted: 03/13/19 08:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The only time you use RV antifreeze is when you winterize for winter storage.
To continue to use the RV during the winter, heat and insulation is used


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2oldman

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Posted: 03/13/19 09:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Use your heat, not AF. Terrible idea to put it in the FW tank.

dougrainer wrote:

I have never heard of this or been asked the question in 40 years as a Tech.
And he's been on here 14 years.

maillemaker

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Posted: 03/13/19 09:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In my rig, the freshwater tank is under one of the beds. The furnace ductwork runs under that bed and out a vent there. There is no direct venting into that space under the bed, but I would bet the residual heat from the duct work at least keeps the area above freezing. Not to mention that the entire compartment is basically inside the living quarters of the RV (though it is under a mattress and some wood). I don't think our fresh water tank would ever get cold enough to freeze as long as the inside of the RV was kept warm enough for people.

Where is your fresh water tank located?

Steve


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ScottG

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Posted: 03/13/19 10:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You should not consume RV AF in any strength. So you cannot dilute and use it to wash dishes, brush your teeth, bath, etc.
You could use it to flush the toilet but once you dilute it, it has no ability to keep water from freezing. It is not like automotive AF.


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Dutch_12078

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Posted: 03/13/19 03:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ScottG wrote:

You should not consume RV AF in any strength. So you cannot dilute and use it to wash dishes, brush your teeth, bath, etc.
You could use it to flush the toilet but once you dilute it, it has no ability to keep water from freezing. It is not like automotive AF.


While I wouldn't recommend gulping down large amounts of it, the propylene glycol commonly used in RV anti-freeze is rated as GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) for use in food products by the US FDA. Along with many food products, it's also used in many medications and cosmetics.

Propylene Glycol in Food: Is This Additive Safe?


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ScottG

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Posted: 03/13/19 04:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dutch_12078 wrote:

ScottG wrote:

You should not consume RV AF in any strength. So you cannot dilute and use it to wash dishes, brush your teeth, bath, etc.
You could use it to flush the toilet but once you dilute it, it has no ability to keep water from freezing. It is not like automotive AF.


While I wouldn't recommend gulping down large amounts of it, the propylene glycol commonly used in RV anti-freeze is rated as GRAS (Generally Recognized As Safe) for use in food products by the US FDA. Along with many food products, it's also used in many medications and cosmetics.

Propylene Glycol in Food: Is This Additive Safe?


The tiny concentrations found in food products is NOTHING compared to drinking antifreeze made out of it.

This is one of the big reasons I rarely post here. No matter what, someone always has to come back with an argument. Even in a situation like this where we're discussing something as obviously bad as consuming antifreeze.

* This post was edited 03/13/19 04:21pm by ScottG *

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