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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Terrible turning of Ford E450 202” WB

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SFVdave

Southern California

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Posted: 04/04/19 12:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My 2016 ClassC on the Ford E450 chassis has a 202” wheelbase and the turning is terrible. The steering just doesn’t turn enough. I have seen ClassA MHs make turns much sharper than I can. Even my old 2004 ClassC Winnebago E350 with a 132” wheel base turned much sharper. This 202” WB makes driving much different. I have to turn the wheel much more and corrections that longer to have an effect. I don’t suppose there is anything that can be done to correct this.

blownstang01

Upstate NY

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Posted: 04/04/19 12:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Correct, there is nothing to be done. Nature of the Beast.

DrewE

Vermont

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Posted: 04/04/19 01:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That's simply basic mechanics/physics at play, yes. You (and I) have a chassis with an unexceptional wheel cut angle and a long wheelbase, which means the minimum turning radius is not very tight. A long wheelbase generally means that corrections take longer to respond, and turns at intersections, etc. must be started later to avoid clipping curbs, independent of the turning radius.

You do get used to these things over time, at least to a large extent. That's not to say that tooling around tight places like parking lots or gas stations is ever really easy.

I find I experience as much difficulty or annoyance when going back to my car after driving the RV for awhile. The first few curves I feel as though I'm about to swerve off the road and into the trees due to the steering being much more responsive and sensitive. It does not take very long to adjust back.





carringb

Corvallis, OR

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Posted: 04/04/19 01:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There is one fix, but it's not cheap. You can take it to QuadVan, and do a solid-axle conversion. You can get a little bit better using an F350 axle, and a lot better using an F550 axle. Both require a 2" lift, and the F550 conversion would also require upgrading to 19.5" wheels and tires.


Bryan

2000 Ford E450 V10 VAN! 450,000+ miles
2014 ORV really big trailer
2015 Ford Focus ST


the bear II

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Posted: 04/04/19 02:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Class A's and commercial trucks have close to a 50 degree wheel cut angle so it makes for better turning radius. You're stuck with what you've got. You will get used to setting up turns and backing into tight spaces to reduce the amount of jockeying you need to do. I practice in a big empty parking lot by setting up cones for a variety of parking situations anytime I get a new RV or truck. This allows me to get used to how the vehicle reacts when backing or turning in tight spots.

Olddud

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Posted: 04/04/19 04:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was so frustrated with that terrible turning radius, I got rid of it after the second year of ownership and got a Sprinter. We got stuck going up the side of a mountain in a residential area in Silverthorne, Co. while towing, and I said, never again.

I know the two are not the same capability-wise, but I wanted something to help keep the few remaining hairs on my head while driving anywhere more than slightly challenging.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 04/04/19 04:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Why does the 550 require a 2 inch lift?

I'm considering replacing my rear springs with 550.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

carringb

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Posted: 04/04/19 05:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Why does the 550 require a 2 inch lift?

I'm considering replacing my rear springs with 550.


Up, front it's required to clear the engine crossmember. Back is raised only to match, if needed.

pianotuna

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Posted: 04/04/19 07:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ty carringb

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Posted: 04/04/19 07:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have to ask... doesn't anyone do a test drive before buying a motorhome? This forum is continually inundated with complaints about the ride and handling of the posters motorhome. If you do a thorough test drive and it rides and/or handles poorly, why do people still buy it? [emoticon]

Clearly, it is not going to get better all by itself, right? If you buy a coach that has issues and you are prepared to deal with them I get that. {My dad used to say that any problem that can be solved by money is not a problem... "If you have the money".} [emoticon]

There are lots of aftermarket goodies that purport to cure all of the ride and handling issues we so frequently see here in the complaint posts. All it takes is time and money thrown at the problem and you can probably find "some" improvement... but why go there in the first place?

I wonder how many folks would go to a high dollar SUV dealer {Mercedes, BMW, Porsche, Land Rover etc.} and plop down something well north of $100,000 only to discover that it rides and drives like a pig on roller skates. The salesman says "no problem" just get it aligned and spend another 2, 3 or 4 thousand dollars on aftermarket add ons and it will be fine {maybe}. [emoticon]
{Hint, this is where: "Run Forrest run" becomes pretty good advice.}

I'm guessing not many if any would be so foolish but when it comes to buying motorhomes obviously lots of people do exactly that. IMHO: Any decent motorhome should ride, drive and handle well right off of the showroom floor without the need for any aftermarket modifications.
If it doesn't then it is the wrong motorhome.

Keep shopping folks, there are lots of fine quality coaches out there. Rant off for now...
But I'm still waiting to hear why this is so prevalent {but it won't keep me awake tonight}.

[emoticon]





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