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Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > Terrible turning of Ford E450 202” WB

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pnichols

The Other California

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Joined: 04/26/2005

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Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 04/11/19 11:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Slowmover wrote:

Through to the end of their lives, most folks follow the front wheels around.

But every vehicle out there PIVOTS off of the rear axle. Knowing where to place the rear axle as a turn commences, is the trick

The Steer Axle follows the path laid out by the Drive Axle. It can’t be otherwise.

What makes a C cumbersome is the rear overhang. Exaggerates every improper angle.

Were I instructing I’d tell the driver to go farther into the intersection to “feel” where is the Drive Axle and THEN commence with cranking the wheel over. It’s what we do with big trucks.

Think of the turn as being in two parts. Place the Drive Axle. And then it’s a separate operation to use the wheel cut to bring it around.

One goes significantly farther into the intersection, first. There’s no diagonal across it.

And one moves a good deal more slowly than with a personal vehicle. Too hard on the tires otherwise. Five-mph under the posted ramp speed (clear weather minimum)

To put it all in perspective: the hilarious insistence of having to have a higher injury risk pickup versus a family vehicle to pull a travel trailer. It has the same roots: a vehicle being operated abnormally which is driver-only. Better would be to LEARN: load that personal vehicle to maximum and drive it that way 13-weeks. With an emphasis on lowest wear. Sure won’t be whipping it around like you do today.

Today’s drivers haven’t a clue that they must PILOT the vehicle. It has its needs. Try to respect them.

Brains, not feelz. How long do tires and brakes last on your personal vehicle? Less than 70k? Rotation required due to wear on front set? These are indicative of insufficient driving skill. Braking into turns (too fast for conditions)? Etc.

A box truck is the least “fun” vehicle to drive. Funny as hell to me to see a Moho with a towed. Two drivetrains is double the headaches. And having to unhitch to park is a problem I wouldn’t want. All for a vehicle with interior space compromised and badly utilized.

My pickup is 163”. The Pete is 265”. Neither is a ballerina. But both are easier to drive (hitched to their trailers — former at 63’ long, latter at 72’ long) than a Moho of any significant size. Not until you hit the top (Newell) are they ever “fast” in pro hands.

And I can do maneuvers with my TT hitched — all day — that’ll put most Moho + towed into the ditch.

Take your time, OP, and cut the slices thinner. Each maneuver has more parts to it than it than you thought.

The trip just takes what it takes. You either like this problem-solving or not.

You want a 100-mph RV hotrod, then a 27’ Airstream behind a Porsche Cayenne Turbo will suit.

Some very good advice and comments up above!

In addition, here's some of my FWIW added thougths that will sound and seem absurd to many:

- Never tow anything unless absolutely necessary, as the physics of that make it inherently more dangerous no matter how you do it.

- What the above statement means is ... motorhome RV's not towing anything are more safe than TT RVs, 5'er RVs, or popup trailer RVs.

- Use a motorhome RV as small in length as you can possibly tolerate ... and don't tow anything behind it.

- Even with a small motorhome RV, use one with a short as possible wheelbase for maneuverability and just learn how to deal with it's rear overhang.

- Never drive over the speed limit and ofttimes drive under the speed limit ... and that includes the posted speed limits for curves and off-ramps.

So far we have been able to practice what we preach regarding the above: We use a 24 foot motorhome on a 158 inch wheelbase, we drive 55-60 MPH on the highways, and we drive 7-10 MPH on dirt/gravel roads out in the middle of nowhere.

P.S. Ooops, I must confess ... we do very rarely tow a 14 foot aluminum boat behind our small motorhome when going to/from our favorite fishing/camping spot. I guess I'm taking a chance for access to larger bass and trout. [emoticon]


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

rjstractor

Auburn, WA

Senior Member

Joined: 01/20/2003

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Posted: 04/11/19 08:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Slowmover wrote:

Through to the end of their lives, most folks follow the front wheels around.

But every vehicle out there PIVOTS off of the rear axle. Knowing where to place the rear axle as a turn commences, is the trick

The Steer Axle follows the path laid out by the Drive Axle. It can’t be otherwise.

What makes a C cumbersome is the rear overhang. Exaggerates every improper angle.

Were I instructing I’d tell the driver to go farther into the intersection to “feel” where is the Drive Axle and THEN commence with cranking the wheel over. It’s what we do with big trucks.

Think of the turn as being in two parts. Place the Drive Axle. And then it’s a separate operation to use the wheel cut to bring it around.

One goes significantly farther into the intersection, first. There’s no diagonal across it.

And one moves a good deal more slowly than with a personal vehicle. Too hard on the tires otherwise. Five-mph under the posted ramp speed (clear weather minimum)

To put it all in perspective: the hilarious insistence of having to have a higher injury risk pickup versus a family vehicle to pull a travel trailer. It has the same roots: a vehicle being operated abnormally which is driver-only. Better would be to LEARN: load that personal vehicle to maximum and drive it that way 13-weeks. With an emphasis on lowest wear. Sure won’t be whipping it around like you do today.

Today’s drivers haven’t a clue that they must PILOT the vehicle. It has its needs. Try to respect them.

Brains, not feelz. How long do tires and brakes last on your personal vehicle? Less than 70k? Rotation required due to wear on front set? These are indicative of insufficient driving skill. Braking into turns (too fast for conditions)? Etc.

A box truck is the least “fun” vehicle to drive. Funny as hell to me to see a Moho with a towed. Two drivetrains is double the headaches. And having to unhitch to park is a problem I wouldn’t want. All for a vehicle with interior space compromised and badly utilized.

My pickup is 163”. The Pete is 265”. Neither is a ballerina. But both are easier to drive (hitched to their trailers — former at 63’ long, latter at 72’ long) than a Moho of any significant size. Not until you hit the top (Newell) are they ever “fast” in pro hands.

And I can do maneuvers with my TT hitched — all day — that’ll put most Moho + towed into the ditch.

Take your time, OP, and cut the slices thinner. Each maneuver has more parts to it than it than you thought.

The trip just takes what it takes. You either like this problem-solving or not.

You want a 100-mph RV hotrod, then a 27’ Airstream behind a Porsche Cayenne Turbo will suit.


All very true. What makes these E series Ford motorhomes difficult to pilot is the relative lack of cramp angle on the steer axle. You mentioned the box truck, I occasionally get to drive a box truck with a sleeper cab, a 24' foot box and tandem drive axles. It actually is "fun" to drive despite its roughly 260" wheelbase, and a big part of that is the ridiculously tight cramp angle on the front axle. I once had to maneuver a 25' flatbed trailer hooked to the box truck and was shocked how easily I could back the combo up despite its size.

But you are absolutely correct, you need a different mentality to drive these vehicles successfully. Every move needs to be thought out in advance and executed correctly to avoid running over curbs and other mishaps.

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