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Big_steve

SW Florida

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Posted: 05/10/19 08:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good morning,
Name is Steve. New to the forum, and don't have an RV yet. I did a search, but didn't really get the info I was looking for. Need some help deciding between a TT or MH. Wife and I are in our 60's, kids out of the house and looking for a medium sized TT or Class C MH. We can afford either of these used. We would like to use it for vacations, not as full timers, even after we retire.

I've driven some trucks and a Class A MH over the years, so I don't suspect I would have trouble driving a class C. The only trailer I've pulled regularly was a 16 ft boat. I did okay with the boat, but I was no pro either. But I was able to quickly see when I was doing something wrong, and could start over without causing a fiasco.

So, I have no tow vehicle, which prohibits me from renting a trailer to take it out and see how it feels. I can afford a used tow vehicle, and frankly, it might be nice having a pickup truck around for trips to Home depot, etc...

So I guess I'm asking if anyone else has been in my boat and what did you decide, and are you happy with your decision? Backing a trailer seems a bit daunting, but what the heck, if others can learn, I'm sure I can also.

wanderingaimlessly

SOBOVA

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Posted: 05/10/19 08:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If towing is a concern , consider that either way, you will likely be towing. Either a truck pulling a tt, or the Class C pulling a small car for touring and side trips.

If you believe you will not be doing side trips that much but will move every two days or so, and don't mind walking halfway across a parking lot to buy groceries etc, a MH by itself can work.

If you want to park the house and take side trips to tour the local sights, then a toad becomes more important, and you are again towing.

If you go MH, you will have maintenance on it, plus any tow vehicle (which will likely be one of your daily drivers) with a TT you have the truck maintenance , which as you said could also become a daily use vehicle.

Making a decision on whats right in your case is one as personal as you, there are so many options because there are so many ways to use the rigs.

Uhaul and Enterprise both rent pickups , so you could rent one for 2 or 3 days as well as renting a trailer to try it. If it would help with your decision.

Jebby14

Windsor Ontario

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Posted: 05/10/19 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TT all the way for me. I like my truck (its my daily driver) and I don't have another powertrain to maintain and towing isn't that hard. If you could hit the launch with the boat backing up is no problem (longer is easier). easy choice for me, just make sure you understand your weights and get enough tow vehicle.


If it moves and it shouldn't..... duct tape
if it doesn't move and it should.....WD40
if all else fails .....BFH


schlep1967

Harrisburg, PA

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Posted: 05/10/19 08:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Think about this, you are all set up at your campsite for the week. On day 3 you run out of milk, or any other supply. Now you have to disconnect your electric and stow the cord, put away the lawn chairs and any other items you may have out on your site, disconnect and put away the sewer hose and if your wife is like mine, put away several breakables inside so you can drive the house to the store. That is what you get with a motorhome. With the TT, you jump in the truck and make a quick trip to the store.
And these fancy newer trucks have cameras and extras that make backing easier.


2008 Dodge Ram 2500 Diesel
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Jayco-noslide

Galesburg,Il., USA

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Posted: 05/10/19 08:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Over 40 years we've had about every type of RV except a Class A MH. Currently a 30 ft. 2003 Winnebago C with 2 slides purchased used in 2013. I believe it is the best overall compared to a 5th wheel, trailer and pop-up. Backs easier, on-board generator, 2 batteries, large tanks, and more. However, nothing is perfect. We tow a car which has it's own set of challenges. And motor homes cost a lot. We "only" paid $23000 but have spent a lot on repairs and improvements. Now a word about only using it for vacations. If you will only live in it 2 weeks a year, it's just not worth it economically as the cost per day will be way over hotel, resort, etc. We live in ours about 80 days a year which really lowers the per day costs.


Jayco-noslide

BarneyS

S.E. Lower Michigan

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Posted: 05/10/19 09:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe the easiest way to get into RVing is with a travel trailer and truck. That is probably the least expensive way. Doing that will give you a vehicle to use for exploring after you get to your destination and also to run errands or go for that item you forgot - which always seems to come up. [emoticon]
Backing a travel trailer is not hard at all. After just a couple of trips you will be a pro at it. In addition, most campgrounds have pull through sites where no backing up is required.

If after a few years, you feel you want to move to another type of RV the combo should be easier to sell than a Motorhome, simply because tt are the most popular type of RV.

Good luck with your choice and hunt. Should be a lot of fun. [emoticon]
Barney


2004 Sunnybrook Titan 30FKS TT
Hensley "Arrow" 1400# hitch (Sold)
2019 Ram Limited 1500, 5.7L Hemi, 4x4, SB
Not towing now.
Former tow vehicles were 2016 Ram 2500 CTD, 2002 Ford F250, 7.3 PSD


catkins

Western Washington

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Posted: 05/10/19 09:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have RVed for over 20 years, starting in a Class C then As. In my growing up days, we tented and then had trailers. Here are some reasons why we chose MHs over trailers.

In bad weather, we can pull in, and basically start enjoying our stay. Elec and water can be connected later. Having levelers does away with the need to use blocks or similar under wheels to get level - push a button and done. Rest stops - you can choose to use your own bathroom without stepping outside and in a pinch, the passenger can use the bathroom while in motion (I KNOW - not safe.)

The routine to hook up a trailer can be quite time consuming and yes, it gets faster with practice. With a MH, you unplug, stow hoses and elec cord, retract levelers and off you go.

MHs have advantages over trailers in other ways -
better storage in most MHs, better insulation often, larger tank storage capacities often, better visibility our windows, onboard generator vs portable to name a few.

Truck pulling vs pulling a Toad (towed vehicle) behind MH - a Toad must be able to be towed by the MH(weight restrictions) and be mechanically able to be towed. There is a cost to getting a Toad setup and purchasing the tow bar/aux brake. It is easy to connect/disconnect quickly. Gives the flexibility once in camp to sightsee and do errands. We did MH only for one trip and quickly decided we wanted the freedom a Toad offers.

You will need to consider which will work best for you now and as you age. What is easy now may well become more difficult as you get more "mature." Look at floor plans and think about travel needs. Take your time, ask lots here and do NOT believe what salesmen tell you without verifying. Yes, there are some excellent and honest sales people but their focus in on moving a unit and getting a commission.

Do your research and here's to many happy RVing years!

* This post was edited 05/10/19 03:37pm by catkins *

opnspaces

San Diego Ca

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Posted: 05/10/19 11:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I went through the same thing 15 years ago (wow I can't believe my trailer is 15 years old) and decided on a trailer for a few reasons.

Probably the biggest reason was perceived maintenance and breakdown recovery. I figured if I had an engine or transmission problem on the road I could go almost anywhere to have a Chevy Suburban repaired. Fortunately I never broke down on the road, but that was the reason.

Fast forward that 15 years with a divorce and kids in their teens and a MH is starting to be more desirable as you can just get in, turn the key and go. But in the end I can't remember ever camping and not getting in the Suburban to go somewhere so I'll probably stay with a trailer.


1996 Suburban 4x4. 350, 4.10 3/4 ton
2005 Jayco Jay Flight 27BH
1986 Coleman Columbia Popup.

2012Coleman

Florida

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Posted: 05/10/19 11:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My recommendation is to go to a dealer and tour some units of both types. It's pretty easy to see yourself in the unit your touring - hang out in the dinette, on the couch, bed, etc. If your getting a motorized RV, you will either have to tow a car, rent something or be stuck at the camp site.

If you have a General RV dealership within a reasonable distance, check their used selection. Then, once you find a platform you think you would buy, start looking at Craigslist, and RV Trader. Look at dealerships too, but check prices on NADA and never pay the asking price.

On any particular unit, make sure you can check it out while it's plugged in and can have all systems demonstrated - AC water heater, Fridge, water pump, etc.

Check the date codes on the tires - especially a travel trailer. ST tires can look good while being at the end of their lives.

Backing gets easier and yes, a pickup truck is a handy item to have for home use.

Don't rush and come back and ask questions.


Experience without good judgment is worthless; good judgment without experience is still good judgment!

2018 RAM 3500 Big Horn CTD
2018 Grand Design Reflection 303RLS

gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 05/10/19 12:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

catkins wrote:

MHs have advantages over trailers in other ways -
better storage in most MHs, better insulation often, larger tank storage capacities often, better visibility our windows, snf onboard generator vs portable to name a few.

And whey you're rolling down the interstate and encounter a five mile backup of stopped traffic, you can access your food, drink and bathroom without leaving your vehicle. Ask your DW if she thinks that is an advantage. [emoticon]

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