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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Negative/Ground wire

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myredracer

Langley B.C.

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wot? Why would anyone be worried about corrosion?? [emoticon]

Here's what the mini-breaker in our A-frame looked like after a year. I don't see any corrosion, lol!

The 2nd photo is what the ground lug in the A-frame looked like after a year. I replaced it with two new larger lugs with more surface area and the connections are soldered and wrapped with heat shrink tubing. I made it a redundant ground setup and attached the lugs on opposite sides of the A-frame with stainless steel self-tappers. While I didn't use it, a little dielectric grease might help too. The ground lugs they use aren't approved for wet locations but they all seem to use them.

The converter will also be grounded with a bare and insulated ground wire to the frame (probably near the converter). We had a a couple of similar ground lugs like the above one attached to the frame. Think of all the water thrown up by the tires. The green wire was being hit by the tire all the time and would have worn through at some point. I replaced the original lugs with a brass grounding split type stud intended for wet locations. One of these studs would be a good choice for the grounding in the A-frame.

I went a step further and relocated all the splices and breakers in our (typical) 4x4 metal box into a watertight PVC box. Some of the marrettes were upside down and filled with water. Some of the wires were tarnished and I dipped the ends in acid before soldering the splices.

[image][image] [image][image][image][image]


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philh

Belleville MI

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Red,

Please explain the why and how you dipped in acid before soldering

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You might want to keep in mind the best 2 paints I have found for "painting overtop" screws that ground...

Inside: Rust O Leum iron oxide red primer

Out in the weather: Rust O Leum pickup bed paint.


The red oxide sticks and seals and lasts forever

Same thing with bed liner except in addition it resists sand and gravel abrasion. They are two amazing primers IMHO

MEXICOWANDERER

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ECHO.

Chris Bryant

Arden, North Carolina

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I really like the wax based battery terminal spray. Had a couple of 17 year old applications with no corrosion.

I do not believe a ground loop is an issue on a dc circuit, so if it were mine, I would run a separate ground lead, even though it is likely fine without it.


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ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Improving the ground is almost always a good idea.

BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"I do not believe a ground loop is an issue on a dc circuit,"

The inverter one I mentioned above included 120v and DC where their grounds get all mixed up when doing whole house. 120v shore cord grounded to frame into inverter chassis grounded to frame powered by batteries grounded to frame. It could well have been a 120v issue. Whatever it was, the factory had to redesign an inverter component to correct that.


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myredracer

Langley B.C.

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Posted: 05/15/19 09:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

philh wrote:

Red,

Please explain the why and how you dipped in acid before soldering
I used what I had handy in the garage, either phosphoric acid or muriatic acid - can't remember which. For soldering, you need the wires clean and shiny otherwise the solder won't work well, if at all. If wires are tarnished or corroded, soldering flux won't help. Like when soldering copper pipes, you need the copper clean and shiny (with emery cloth or wire brush) before soldering. There's a few methods to clean copper wire, one common method being vinegar (acetic acid).

Wires that were in the junction box that didn't have marrettes pointing up and filled with water didn't need to be cleaned with acid and soldered just fine after stripping back insulation a bit. On the tarnished wires, you can strip the insulation back a long way and still find tarnished copper because the moisture wicks inside the insulation jacket.

ktmrfs

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Posted: 05/15/19 11:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lynnmor wrote:

theoldwizard1 wrote:



lenr wrote:

2) Is there anything wrong with adding a negative wire, but leaving the frame connections?

Yes, you will create a "ground loop", which could potentially depleat the battery.



I see no reason that a battery would be depleted, a ground loop is just a concern for electronic equipment interference.


exactly.


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time2roll

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Posted: 05/15/19 12:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Either way is fine. I would not fix what is not broken.


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