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JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 05/20/19 06:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Chris Bryant wrote:

I put over 400k miles on a set of aluminum wheels, no issues.

Your trailer wheels have over 400k miles ??
I've had commercial trailers with that many miles but its rare a rv trailer has that kind of miles of service.


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Posted: 05/20/19 06:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I make sure they are coated, that way you can just spray them off. It’s not much fun when it comes to polishing the ones that are not coated!
Good Luck

Chris Bryant

Arden, North Carolina

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Posted: 05/20/19 06:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JIMNLIN wrote:

Chris Bryant wrote:

I put over 400k miles on a set of aluminum wheels, no issues.

Your trailer wheels have over 400k miles ??
I've had commercial trailers with that many miles but its rare a rv trailer has that kind of miles of service.


Yes, I figured about 430,000 miles. Best service out of tires were Michelin xca lt tires, 90,000 miles..

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buc1980

houston tx

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Posted: 05/20/19 11:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Aluminum are better but be sure is American made like Alcoa.


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Chum lee

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Posted: 05/20/19 01:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

garmp wrote:

Thinking about getting aluminum wheels for the RV.
What are the pro's & cons of such a decision?
Cost is definitely a factor and the looks are better, but are there any other advantages/disadvantages.
I feel that the improved look is worth so much, but if I'm risking other issues down the road is the transition worth it.
Your thoughts.


For RV's, aluminum wheels are clearly an appearance upgrade where the value is determined by the user.

Aluminum wheels are more easily damaged by pot holes and other road debris but because you use high profile truck tires, (rather than low profile performance tires) they are much less susceptible in your application. In some cases they can be repaired where steel wheels would become scrap metal.

Once initiated, aluminum can show accelerated corrosion due to pitting caused by environmental factors, but a good clear coat or anodizing can protect against that as long as you keep the wheels fairly clean, which is another thing.

Many alloy wheels use different fasteners than their steel counterparts so make sure you are covered if you plan on using a steel spare. Make sure the wheel offsets are the same also.

One last thing. Popular sizes of nice shiny new alloy wheels and new tires catch many "unwanted" eyes and are easily sold, so, make sure you provide adequate security to protect your new investment.

Chum lee

CharlesinGA

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Posted: 05/21/19 12:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am a fan of steel wheels, very durable and do not get damaged as easily as alloy wheels. That being said, larger steel wheels are heavy, increasing the unsprung weight. My '03 2500 Ram had steel rims on it when I bought it last year (plane jane tradesman model) and I recently started looking for a set of third generation alloy Chrysler wheels. Stumbled into a pristine set off an '09 with 40K original miles on the wheels and tires. (Factory wheels with Chrysler logos and p/n's on them). Swapped my tires onto them last week and was shocked at the weight difference, 17 lbs per wheel lighter for the alloy. (65 lbs vs 82 lbs for wheel/tire assy) It actually drives somewhat different with less weight bouncing around out at the corners. Easier to heft up and mount too.

Charles

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Posted: 05/21/19 05:43am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had steel wheels. I’ve heard issues of aluminum wheels sometimes cracking at the lugs.
On my trailer I put stainless trim rings and chrome center caps on the white steel wheels. Dressed it up nice for next to nothing and I still had strong steel wheels.


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RedRollingRoadblock

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Posted: 05/21/19 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Make sure your wheel studs are long enough to handle the added thicnkness of the alloy wheel.

Gjac

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Posted: 05/21/19 12:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are two main advantages of the alloy wheels, in general they are lighter and more accurate. The steel wheels are stamped and are within .030 ins the alloy wheels are machined within + or - .005 of an inch. For a MH you would be hard pressed to tell the difference in the ride quality. It would be a different story on a performance car that you would race at high speeds. The forged alloy wheels are lighter and stronger than the cast alloy . When I was traveling in Alaska I hit a pot hole on a paved road and bent both my MH steel rim and my tow car steel rim. I was able to straighten both out with a hammer. I would not have been able to do this with cast Al. without cracking it. So for cost and durability I would stay with steel wheels on a MH. Although I did like my Mag wheels on my 54 Ford in HS.

dodge guy

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Posted: 05/21/19 12:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I forgot to add that aluminum trailer wheels differ from aluminum auto wheels. The center hub area is much thicker on trailer wheels.

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