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marc71

South East VA

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Posted: 06/07/19 02:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So we’ve been looking to upgrade to a newer travel trailer and have seen a few models we like, one in particular has a residential fridge. Now we don’t travel full time but we do make some two week trips during the year and were wondering what or how do you maintain a fridge that doesn’t run on propane while traveling? There’s little to no room for a large bank of batteries.


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GordonThree

Northern Michigan

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Posted: 06/07/19 02:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Keep it closed and don't worry. It will stay cold at least 8 to 12 hours.

This assuming you are traveling to a site with electric.

Otherwise, well, someone else can help with solar?


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Walaby

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Posted: 06/07/19 04:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe with an inverter, you can leave it running while you are in transit. The tow vehicle will keep the battery topped off while you are driving. Once you are at your destination, plug in and good to go.

Mike


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SidecarFlip

SE Michigan

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Posted: 06/07/19 04:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Residental fridge compressors are terribly inefficient and pull a lot of amps.

I don't see how any inverter and battery bank would keep up in transit, the tow vehicle don't deliver that many amps to the RV in the first place.

Best bet would be to get it cold before leaving home and don't open the doors until you are on shore power again.

Why I pulled my propane electric fridge last year and installed a Dometic Waeco compressor fridge. Works excellent, draws minimal amps and keep everything cold ot frozen


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Lwiddis

Near USFS Glass Creek CG, Inyo County, CA

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Posted: 06/07/19 04:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Adequate solar and batteries can run an RV “residential” fridge easily most days.


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road-runner

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Posted: 06/07/19 04:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

Residental fridge compressors are terribly inefficient and pull a lot of amps.

I don't see how any inverter and battery bank would keep up in transit, the tow vehicle don't deliver that many amps to the RV in the first place.
Our 15 cu ft kitchen refrigerator draws close to an even amp when running. That would be about 10 amps to power an inverter. I think a power connection would have to be pretty lame to not supply that much, and I'd hope a smaller fridge in a trailer would need less power. (Based on the energy info for a 10.1 cu ft fridge on the Home Depot site, the inverter would pull about 8 amps when the fridge is running).


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pianotuna

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Posted: 06/07/19 05:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi,

That was true 25 years ago. There is a large start up surge--but after that very little energy is needed. Duty cycle is 1:3 so it is only drawing for 20 minutes per hour.

SidecarFlip wrote:

Residental fridge compressors are terribly inefficient and pull a lot of amps.



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ford truck guy

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Posted: 06/07/19 06:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

almost ALL the newer TT's and fivers are either offering the residential as an option, or standard. Our last 2 had a 1000 watt sine wave inverter that was dedicated to the fridge outlet.

We ran from PA to FL without plugging in to shore power and the fridge was still running when we got there. The TV will keep the batteries at charge if everything is operating normal.


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PNW_Steve

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Posted: 06/07/19 08:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SidecarFlip wrote:

Residental fridge compressors are terribly inefficient and pull a lot of amps.

I don't see how any inverter and battery bank would keep up in transit, the tow vehicle don't deliver that many amps to the RV in the first place.

Best bet would be to get it cold before leaving home and don't open the doors until you are on shore power again.

Why I pulled my propane electric fridge last year and installed a Dometic Waeco compressor fridge. Works excellent, draws minimal amps and keep everything cold ot frozen


I replaced my absorbsion refrigerators in my last two rigs with 10.8 cu.ft. Apartment refrigerator.

They draw less than half the power of the units that they replaced (running on 120v).

I have two GC-2 batteries in series. I can be "off grid" for about 24 hours without discharging the batteries below 50% SOC.

I lost the ability to run the refrigerator on propane but that has not been a big deal.

On our "new" rig I have 1800 watts of solar and a 24v 400a/h battery bank. That will run my refrigerator and everything else I want except air conditioning. OK.... In good sun I may be able to run one of my mini splits......


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southernsky

Ponchatoula La.

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Posted: 06/08/19 07:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We have a res fridge in our trailer from factory. Two 12v batteries and an inverter only for the fridge. When traveling on hyway truck keeps batteries charged. We don't boondock so I don't know how that would be


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