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Posted: 06/12/19 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

RollandB wrote:

I certainly see some day the absorption fridge in outs gets replaced with a residential fridge. My question is for those who have them do you have problems with the door opening in transit, if so what do you do to secure it?


When in transit I use velcro that is mounted on the sides of my frig and freezer that I stap in the front and never had a problem so far.

htwheelz67

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Posted: 06/12/19 10:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

I cannot help but wonder if people are discussing a residential refrigerator in an RV or something that is used more like a mobile home that is rarely moved.

A residential refrigerator and solar system would be extremely heavy for an RV that is going to be used for thousands or tens of thousands of miles of travel per year. Residential refrigerators are heavy with a moderate sized unit weighting in at roughly 300#. We can argue about the number of solar panels but it seems 6 would be about the minimum. That will add another roughly 300#. The minimum for a battery bank to handle that power would add another 500# or more. The total would be well over 1000# and that is just for the refrigerator and the portion of solar needed to support it. The system is going to have to be much bigger to handle the rest of the electrical needs.


My 11 cu ft residential fridge is way lighter than my old 8.0 cu ft dometic by probably 100 lbs, it took 2 people and a lift to get my old one out and I lifted my new one my self, solar panels at least my 100 watt only weigh about 6-8 lbs each. If one wanted to spend the dough you could run lifePO lithium batteries which are 1/3 the weight and you can discharge almost 100 %, in my case I'm on shore power 6 mos a year and maybe 2 weeks dry camping and the combo of solar and occasional genny works perfect. My old fridge got ruined by water tripping the gfi and it running out the propane in the 2 weeks I was gone in 110+ heat, now my inverter has an auto transfer switch so if power goes out it switches to batts/solar and back again and no GFI.

One thing no one has discussed here is "how long can a residential fridge compressor last?" bouncing up and down in transit....I guess time will tell.

* This post was edited 06/12/19 10:24am by htwheelz67 *

time2roll

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Posted: 06/12/19 10:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

I cannot help but wonder if people are discussing a residential refrigerator in an RV or something that is used more like a mobile home that is rarely moved.

A residential refrigerator and solar system would be extremely heavy for an RV that is going to be used for thousands or tens of thousands of miles of travel per year. Residential refrigerators are heavy with a moderate sized unit weighting in at roughly 300#. We can argue about the number of solar panels but it seems 6 would be about the minimum. That will add another roughly 300#. The minimum for a battery bank to handle that power would add another 500# or more. The total would be well over 1000# and that is just for the refrigerator and the portion of solar needed to support it. The system is going to have to be much bigger to handle the rest of the electrical needs.
Dometic says Absorption is 60Kg and compressor is 46Kg.

Many people travel the country and beyond without really being off grid overnight. Plenty of posts that the two standard batteries are good for an overnight. So no significant weight.

And if you are mostly off-grid the RV probably already has a couple extra batteries and 400 watts solar. May just need to run the existing generator a bit more.


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Posted: 06/12/19 01:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

I cannot help but wonder if people are discussing a residential refrigerator in an RV.

A residential refrigerator and solar system would be extremely heavy for an RV that is going to be used for thousands or tens of thousands of miles of travel per year. Residential refrigerators are heavy with a moderate sized unit weighting in at roughly 300#.


In our RV we use our res reefer as an RV; we do not do "camping". The 5th wheel is our "hotel" with as many creature comforts as possible. We are disinterested in going into the forests or trails. We prefer paved and immaculate RV resort style traveling.

Upon removing the Nocold we went down in weight; our residential reefer weighs 30 pounds less. Reefer is on 24/7 while traveling, and with a 2000 watt pure sine wave inverter and 2 moderately sized 12v RV/Marine type batteries at the end of the travel day (always going from-to full hookups), final voltage before connecting is about 12.5 to 12.7 volts.


2016 AF 29-5K; 2016 F350 6.7, 4x4, CCLB DRW

pnichols

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Posted: 06/12/19 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Just to add to consumption figures, the Dometic absorption I use consumes a whopping 5.7 KWH per day. That works out to 452 amp-hours @ 12 volts.


Don ... this is a snip from one of your earlier posts in this discussion ... but I really had to double-check it out with you: When heating with propane and powering it's control board with 12 volts -> what absorption refrigerator takes 452 amp-hours per day?

Our RV's Norcold absorption refrig uses about 0.5 amps per hour (continuously, whether cycled ON or OFF) from our house batteries along with sipping propane when cycled ON for heating when drycamping. Although our absorption refrig can operate using only electricity for both it's heating and control, no one of course would use it this way when drycamping with it because it would require way too much power from the house batteries to do this. When switched to propane mode as it should be for drycamping, sipping propane as the source of heat for it's operation of course is the main reason for using an absorption refrigerator for off-the-grid RV camping.

I'm sure you know all of the above, but what were you referring to?

* This post was edited 06/12/19 07:18pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

time2roll

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Posted: 06/12/19 02:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Probably save power to turn the ice maker off when in transit or off-grid.

Reisender

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Posted: 06/12/19 03:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I don’t what size fridge people are comparing. Most residentials are 18 to 22 cubic foot. Ours is 21. We dry camp all the time.

Do any high end manufacturers even use absorption fridges anymore.

pianotuna

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Posted: 06/12/19 03:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi Phil,

I was referring to running on 120 volts only, using an inverter.


pnichols wrote:

pianotuna wrote:

Just to add to consumption figures, the Dometic absorption I use consumes a whopping 5.7 KWH per day. That works out to 452 amp-hours @ 12 volts.


Don ... this is a snip from one of your earlier posts in this discussion ... but I really had to double-check it out with you: When heating with propane and powering it's control board with 12 volts -> what absorption refrigerator takes 452 amp-hours per day?

Our RV's Norcold absorption refrig uses about 0.5 amps per hour (continuously, whether cycled ON or OFF) from our house batteries along with sipping propane when cycled ON for heating when drycamping. Although our absorption refrig can operate using only electricity for both it's heating and control, no one of course would use it this way when drycamping with it because it would require way too much power from the house batteries to do this. When switched to propane mode as it should be for drycamping, sipping propane as the source of heat for it's operation of course is the main reason for using an absorption refrigerator for off-the-grid RV camping.

I'm sure you know all of the above, by what were you referring to?



Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

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Posted: 06/12/19 04:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reisender wrote:

I don’t what size fridge people are comparing. Most residentials are 18 to 22 cubic foot. Ours is 21. We dry camp all the time.

Do any high end manufacturers even use absorption fridges anymore.


We went from a Norcold 12 cu. ft. to an 18 cu. ft.(Fisher & Paykel), dropped 30 lbs in appliance weight, and the beer is cold enough to chip tooth enamel. [emoticon]

I do not know where middle-of-the-road RV's end, and high-end begins (in U.S. dollars), but we have made significant improvements in ours that I would have gladly ordered if it was available as a OEM option.

(vented W/D, E/H disc brakes, residential reefer, Truma water heater, MorRyde suspension, dishwasher, etc)

Reisender

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Posted: 06/12/19 06:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Planning wrote:

Reisender wrote:

I don’t what size fridge people are comparing. Most residentials are 18 to 22 cubic foot. Ours is 21. We dry camp all the time.

Do any high end manufacturers even use absorption fridges anymore.


We went from a Norcold 12 cu. ft. to an 18 cu. ft.(Fisher & Paykel), dropped 30 lbs in appliance weight, and the beer is cold enough to chip tooth enamel. [emoticon]

I do not know where middle-of-the-road RV's end, and high-end begins (in U.S. dollars), but we have made significant improvements in ours that I would have gladly ordered if it was available as a OEM option.

(vented W/D, E/H disc brakes, residential reefer, Truma water heater, MorRyde suspension, dishwasher, etc)


Nice upgrades.

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